Viewing the “Jurassic Coastline”

The famous “Jurassic Coast” stretches for 95 miles (155 kilometres).  It runs from Exmouth in East Devon to Studland Bay in Dorset and the layers of sedimentary rock record approximately 185 million years of Earth’s history. This coastline on the English Channel was designated at England’s first UNESCO natural World Heritage Site back in 2001 and although it attracts hundreds of thousands of tourists every month during the summer, there are still quiet parts to be explored and enjoyed.

A View of the Jurassic Coast Towards Burton Bradstock East of Lyme Regis

Heading east from Lyme Regis to Burton Bradstock.

The view towards West Bay and Burton Bradstock.  A beautiful day on the UNESCO World Heritage site, the “Jurassic Coast”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The photograph shows a section of the sandstone cliffs that lie to the east of Seatown in Dorset, the view shows West Bay and on the far right the sheer sandstone cliffs of Burton Bradstock can just be made out.

What a terrific view, this area of southern England may attract huge numbers of visitors every year, but there are still some areas, especially those more difficult to access parts of the coastline, that can provide opportunities to have a small section of a UNESCO World Heritage site, all to yourself, for a few minutes at least.

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