Rebor Ankylosaurus “War Pig”

The Rebor Ankylosaurus model “War Pig” is coming into stock at Everything Dinosaur.  Available in three colour variations – Plain, Woodland and Mountain, this 1:35 scale model of Ankylosaurus magniventris is the latest addition to the Rebor scale model range.  This beautifully designed armoured dinosaur figure is due to arrive in about four weeks, team members at Everything Dinosaur expect to have stocks in their warehouse by early June.

The Rebor 1:35 Scale “War Pig” Ankylosaurus magniventris

The Rebor Ankylosaurus dinosaur model "Mountain" colour variant.

The Rebor Ankylosaurus dinosaur model “Mountain” colour variant.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Ankylosaurus – Mountain, Plain and Woodland

Ankylosaurus magniventris is regarded as the largest of the Ankylosauridae and although it has had a family of armoured dinosaurs named after it, palaeontologists now think that this Late Cretaceous armoured giant was not typical of the Ankylosaur family.  Ankylosaurus is known from only fragmentary remains found in the USA and Canada and its tail club was more rounded in shape when compared to other closely related Ankylosaurs, an anatomical feature picked up on by the designers at Rebor.  The tail bones (caudal vertebrae), are distinct with “u” shaped neural spines, a feature unique to A. magniventris, hence the relatively broad, wide tail on the Rebor figure.

The Rebor Ankylosaurus “War Pig” Plain

Rebor Ankylosaurus dinosaur model.

Rebor Ankylosaurus “War Pig” Plain.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Why Three Different Versions?

Intriguingly, despite Ankylosaurus being very well-known by the public and a veteran of numerous dinosaur films, palaeontologists regard it as ecologically rare in ancient Late Cretaceous palaeoenvironments.  Compared to the coeval nodosaurid Edmontonia, A. magniventris fossils are much less frequently found, this and differences in the shape of the jaw indicate that these two armoured dinosaurs may have inhabited different habitats and specialised in eating different types of vegetation.  Edmontonia fossils are associated with lowland, fluvial deposits, and the paucity of Ankylosaurus fossil material suggests that this dinosaur was a very infrequent visitor to the floodplains, so where did Ankylosaurus live?

The truth is we don’t know, hence the reason for three different colour variants of Ankylosaurus being introduced by Rebor.  Ankylosaurus may have inhabited upland areas, hence the “mountain” version.  It could have been at home in forested areas, hence the stunning “woodland” model, or equally, it could have been an animal of the open plains, hence the amazing “plain”.

Three Beautiful Versions of Ankylosaurus – Where Do You Think It Lived?

Rebor has made three different versions of Ankylosaurus.

The three different Rebor models “mountain”, “plain” and “woodland”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view Everything Dinosaur’s current range of Rebor replicas: Rebor Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animal Models

Articulated Armoured Dinosaurs

The models have articulated lower jaws, the heads can be rotated and the tails have a metal rod inserted in them that allows the awesome tail club to be put into different positions.  As with all the Rebor replicas, these 1:35 scale figures have been beautifully painted and all three are fantastic additions to the Rebor range.  The models measure 29.5 cm in length and when this is scaled up it puts the Ankylosaurus replicas into the ball park size range stated by the recent (2017) scientific paper.

The Rebor “War Pig” Ankylosaurus – “Woodland”

Rebor Ankylosaurus dinosaur model "woodland".

Rebor Ankylosaurus “woodland”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Due to be in Stock in Four Weeks

These beautiful figures are due to be in stock in four weeks’ time, they can be reserved by dropping Everything Dinosaur an email: Email Everything Dinosaur to Reserve Your Rebor Ankylosaurus

We are looking forward to welcoming this trio of Thyreophorans into our warehouse.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s article on the 2017 paper that described Ankylosaurus as an atypical Ankylosaur: Ankylosaurus Not Your Typical Ankylosaur

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