Prehistoric Themed Artwork

Whilst examining some pictures of cave paintings from a cave in the Dordogne region of France it reminded us how our ancestors depicted life around them and engaged with the animals that shared their Stone Age world.  Today in schools we involve primary school children in a number of prehistoric animal themed artworks and we are always impressed by their enthusiasm.  We have worked with art students on a number of exciting projects, re-creating dinosaurs and impressive models of flying reptiles and marine reptiles.  Every day we receive a number of emails from  dinosaur fans and collectors keen to show off their latest creations and artwork, we are grateful for all the letters, pictures and emails that we receive and  we do read them all.

An Example of a Prehistoric Themed Artwork in a School

Even Mary Anning would be impressed!

Even Mary Anning would be impressed!

Picture Credit: Ocker Hill School

The wonderful skeleton of an Ichthyosaur was created by Year 6 school children studying prehistoric animals as part of their term topic.  A super illustration, one that we suspect will take pride of place in one of the school’s corridors.

Some of the artwork we receive is truly amazing.  We are always impressed by the talents of our many customers and we enjoy receiving illustrations, parts of our warehouse walls are simply covered in pictures, we used to have a large notice board where we placed them but this space was outgrown a long time ago.

Polacanthus – A Lovely Illustration of a Member of the Thyreophora (Shield Bearers)

Lovely example of a customer's artwork

Lovely example of a customer's artwork

Picture Credit: Chris

Above is a typical example of the artwork that we get sent in to us.  This is an illustration of the armoured dinosaur known as Polacanthus (P. foxii) , Chris the illustrator, has been careful to reproduce the sacral shield over the hips and to depict the numerous defensive spikes that this dinosaur known mainly from the Wessex and the base of the Vectis Formations.  Polacanthus was formally named and described in 1865, however the first fossils of this dinosaur to be studied were found in 1843, not long after the Dinosauria Order had been established by Owen.  A number of dermal plates (armour) were discovered near to Sandown on the Isle of Wight, however these fossils were lost when they were accidentally left in the back of a Hackney Carriage and to this day, no one has been able to trace these fossils whereabouts.

The colours chosen are wonderful, the rich, verdant green contrasting with the greyish underbelly and the fearsome looking bony projections on the back of this herbivorous dinosaur.  We are always delighted to receive artwork such as this, it helps to brighten up a dull June morning in our offices.

It’s not just pictures that we receive, we get sent letters from children, model collectors and dinosaur fans from all over the world, these too are read by the team, usually during one of our coffee breaks.  We encourage teachers, LSPs, and TAs in schools that we have visited to help Year 1 and Year 2 with their writing by getting them to send in letters to our team.  The children are always eager to do this and share their knowledge of prehistoric animals with us.

A Thank you Letter from Year 2 (7-8 years Old) School Children

Encouraging writing in schools.

Encouraging writing in schools.

These contributions to our very large mail bag always brighten our day and we loved meeting the “Year2asauruses” along with their enthusiastic teachers and teaching support staff.  We are grateful for the artwork and letters that we receive and we look forward to opening today’s mail bag to see what treasures lie in store for us.

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