Seasonal Greetings to All

A brief article this morning as team members are taking a well deserved holiday but an opportunity nonetheless to wish all our readers a happy Christmas and peaceful, prosperous New Year.  2013 will no doubt, provide us with lots of exciting dinosaur and other prehistoric animal discoveries and fossil finds to talk about.  We are excited to receive news on how Manchester University staff are using a highly sophisticated synchrotron in the United States to take  fresh look at fossils, we have joked that this powerful technology will shed new light literally onto long extinct organisms and reveal details never seen before.

We have plans for a number of fossil hunting trips, that is, if our busy work schedules allow us, it will be great to get out into the field again.  There is also a lot happening at Everything Dinosaur, lots of new products and projects, the first of which our long awaited Pinterest page is now live and should be integrated into our other websites early in the New Year.

Merry Christmas Everybody

Merry Christmas and a Peaceful and Prosperous New Year.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Over the next few days we will finish compiling the results of our annual prehistoric animal popularity survey and towards the end of the year, now less than a week away, we will put together our list of the top ten most popular blog articles.  There is the stock take to complete plus other jobs that we can’t put off any longer so team members are going to be busy throughout the festive period.

One of the things we discussed yesterday, whilst we were finishing off some teaching plans for the school visits planned in early January, was which dinosaur would make the best Christmas dinner?  Technically since Aves (birds) are avian dinosaurs when you eat Turkey, Goose or Chicken you are consuming a member of the Dinosauria.

To read an article written by Everything Dinosaur team members about how your Christmas dinner is technically a dinosaur: Tucking into a Dinosaur at Christmas

If the dinosaurs were around today, this would have implications for extant fauna and flora.  Farms would look very different as bovines (cows) may not have had the chance to evolve so milk may not be regarded as a foodstuff.  Chances are, with the domesticated Dinosauria we would consume a lot of eggs.  As for Christmas dinner, birds would still be around, after all, they flourished in the Cretaceous so it would be likely for the birds to continue to do well as an Class if the dinosaurs had survived into modern times.  Perhaps, Bambiraptor would be a good candidate for Christmas dinner.  This small, carnivorous dinosaur probably grew quickly and it was around turkey-sized.  What would dinosaur have tasted like?  This is a difficult question, but the consensus around our board table yesterday afternoon was that it would probably have tasted like chicken.

Merry Christmas.

Share This!Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0