All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Teaching

Everything Dinosaur team members working in schools, helping museums and other educational bodies. Our work with and in schools.

31 01, 2020

Pachycephalosaurus with a Bump on its Head

By | January 31st, 2020|General Teaching|Comments Off on Pachycephalosaurus with a Bump on its Head

Pachycephalosaurus with a Cranial Lesion

The recently introduced (2020), Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus dinosaur model is a highly detailed and scientifically accurate replica of a Late Cretaceous prehistoric animal.  This dinosaur toy has been expertly sculpted to highlight distinctive traits and characteristics of a “bone-headed” dinosaur.  The dome-headed skull with all its lumps and bumps has been skilfully recreated by the design team at Safari Ltd.

There’s even a scar on the skull showing the damage incurred as a result of a fight with another dinosaur.

An Everything Dinosaur Team Member Points out the “Battle Damage” on the Skull of the Dinosaur Model

Battle damage on a Pachycephalosaurus model.

An Everything Dinosaur team member highlights the battle damage on the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Cranial Lesion

The models and figures that make up the Wild Safari Prehistoric World range by Safari Ltd are great for creative, imaginative play.  The prehistoric animal models are thoroughly researched so that they are as accurate as possible.  The Pachycephalosaurus figure has been intricately painted in a striking orange colour with the skull area coloured grey.  It is an excellent figure, one that will encourage children to have fun and play whilst learning more about the lives of long extinct animals.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus Dinosaur Model (Safari Ltd)

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus with cranial lesion.

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Pachycephalosaurus (the arrow indicates cranial lesion).  The red arrow in the picture highlights the cranial lesion on the dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Safari Ltd have a substantial range of dinosaurs and prehistoric animal models in their portfolio.  The design team try their very best to provide scientifically accurate figures and this Pachycephalosaurus with its battle damage is typical of this model range.  Providing a dinosaur with a realistic dent in its skull (battle damage), helps children to appreciate that these models represent animals that lived in the past, animals that were just as active and complex as many animals that the children are familiar with that are alive today.”

To view the Safari Ltd Pachycephalosaurus and the rest of the models and figures in this range available from Everything Dinosaur: Wild Safari Prehistoric World Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals Models.

14 01, 2020

Ysgol Maes Owen – Deinosoriaid

By | January 14th, 2020|General Teaching, Key Stage 1/2|Comments Off on Ysgol Maes Owen – Deinosoriaid

Ysgol Maes Owen – Deinosoriaid

The children in Year 3 and Year 4 at Ysgol Maes Owen in North Wales have been studying dinosaurs and fossils this spring term.  The eager young palaeontologists constructed a “dinosaur island” and are researching prehistoric animals so that they can populate their own “Jurassic World”.  As part of  the term topic, the enthusiastic teaching team have challenged the children to learn lots of dinosaur facts and to build a set of dinosaur “Top Trumps”.  We hope our advice about which was the cleverest dinosaur helped.

With four workshops to squeeze into the day, a classroom had to be allocated for the visitor from Everything Dinosaur.  Not to worry, there was plenty of space in the classroom to put all the resources our dinosaur expert had brought and there was still room to have a go at creeping through a forest like a giant, armoured dinosaur.

During wet play (thanks to storm Brendan), Lilly demonstrated her appreciation of dinosaurs (deinosoriaid), she certainly enjoys learning all about dinosaurs as her note (below) shows.

Lilly Shows Her Appreciation for Dinosaurs

Lilly showing her appreciation of dinosaurs.

Lilly loves dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Ysgol Maes Owen/Everything Dinosaur

We are sure the footprint measuring resources along with the dinosaur timeline lesson plan we provided will help the teaching team with this exciting topic.

10 01, 2020

Spotting a Gomphotherium

By | January 10th, 2020|Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Spotting a Gomphotherium

Whilst on a visit to a school to deliver a series of dinosaur and fossil themed workshops to lower Key Stage 2 classes, one of our team members at Everything Dinosaur was given the opportunity to view some of the work carried out by the Year six children as they studied Darwinism and natural selection as part of their curriculum.  Several of the children had collaborated on poster displays providing an outline of Darwin’s ground-breaking theory regarding how populations change due to the transfer of heritable traits from one generation to another.  The posters included details of Darwin’s life such as his voyage on the Beagle, his work on the finches on the Galapagos Islands and of course, the publication of his book “The Origin of Species” and its consequences for academia and the wider world.

One part of the display focused on the evolution of the elephant family (Order Proboscidea) and our eagle-eyed team member spotted an image of the CollectA Deluxe 1:20 scale Gomphotherium model that had been used to help illustrate different genera of ancient elephants.

An Image of the CollectA Deluxe 1:20 Scale Gomphotherium Model Features in the Display

CollectA Deluxe Gomphotherium model features in a school poster.

The CollectA Deluxe 1:20 scale Gomphotherium model features in a display on the evolution of elephants.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Many different types of prehistoric elephant were featured in the posters.  For example, one of the earliest and most primitive members of the elephant family – Moeritherium was featured, along with Deinotheres and representatives of the Mammuthus genus.

The CollectA Deluxe Gomphotherium Model

CollectA Gomphotherium.

The CollectA 1:20 scale Gomphotherium model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our team member suggested that Everything Dinosaur would be happy to assist the children with their studies by providing scale drawings of a number of proboscideans.

16 12, 2019

Colourful Cretaceous-themed Seasonal Gift

By | December 16th, 2019|General Teaching|Comments Off on Colourful Cretaceous-themed Seasonal Gift

Colourful Cretaceous-themed Seasonal Gift

During our many visits to schools to deliver dinosaur and fossil themed workshops, we are constantly amazed at the creativity of the teaching teams and the schoolchildren.  As the autumn term draws to a close we know that this time of year is exceptionally busy for schools.  With Christmas just around the corner and many schools due to break up for the holidays in the next few days or so, there is so much still to do.  Plus, of course there is all the planning for the scheme of work for the next term to complete.  We know from our bulging mail bag and congested email inbox that lesson plan preparation and topic area research are well underway in schools as dedicated teaching teams and their senior leadership finalise plans for spring.

We were surprised therefore to receive this thoughtful seasonal gift in the post.  A very creative idea, a set of window stickers for our office with a dinosaur theme.

A Creative and Seasonal Gift for our Dinosaur Experts

Dinosaur window stickers.

Dinosaur themed seasonal transfers.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

There are so many inspirational and clever teachers in schools.  We get to work with some extraordinary and very talented people.  This certainly is a very colourful and creative gift, which our dinosaur experts greatly appreciate.

10 12, 2019

Dinosaurs Help with Sentence Construction

By | December 10th, 2019|Key Stage 1/2|Comments Off on Dinosaurs Help with Sentence Construction

Dinosaurs Help with Sentence Construction

A team member from Everything Dinosaur spotted this innovative approach to teaching Key Stage 1 children the rudiments of sentence construction whilst on a visit to the school to conduct a dinosaur and fossil themed workshop.  In order to help the Year 1 children to understand how sentences are formed, the teacher had drawn a dinosaur and asked the children to describe it.  The adjectives the class came up with when they viewed the drawing were recorded and then these adjectives were used to construct a sentence.

Dinosaurs Help with Sentence Construction

Sentence construction in Lower Key Stage 1.

Looking at sentence construction in Lower Key Stage 1.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We are not quite sure what the genus the dinosaur illustration represents, perhaps it is one that has yet to be formally scientifically described.  That’s not the point, when it came to using adjectives the spotty dinosaur provided the class with plenty of opportunities to come with lots of “describing words”.

6 12, 2019

Greenhill Primary Palaeontologists

By | December 6th, 2019|General Teaching, Key Stage 1/2|Comments Off on Greenhill Primary Palaeontologists

Greenhill Primary Palaeontologists

Children in Year 1 at Greenhill Primary (Bury, Greater Manchester), have been busy learning all about dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals this term.  A team member was given the opportunity to visit the school to work with the eager, young palaeontologists over the course of the morning.  The first part of the session was based in the spacious hall, the second part of the workshop, which involved dinosaur footprint measuring and finding fossils, took place in the well-appointed and very tidy classroom.

Year 1 Children Had Created a Play Area for Their Dinosaurs

Year 1 children explore what dinosaurs need to keep them safe and happy.

Year 1 children at Greenhill Primary have created a play area for their dinosaurs.  A great way to explore the property of materials.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

As an extension exercise, our dinosaur expert challenged the children to draw a dinosaur and to label its body parts including the skull.  During the wet play, Nayaab drew and labelled a beautiful pink and blue dinosaur which was then presented to Everything Dinosaur at the conclusion of the morning’s activities.

Drawing and Labelling a Dinosaur

Drawing and labelling a pink and blue dinosaur.

Drawing and labelling a dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Nayaab

28 11, 2019

Wonky Horned Dinosaur Skeleton

By | November 28th, 2019|General Teaching|Comments Off on Wonky Horned Dinosaur Skeleton

Horned Dinosaur Skull – Not Symmetrical

A team of scientists writing in the prestigious journal “Cretaceous Research”, have discovered the beautifully preserved skull of a horned dinosaur.  The skull comes from a Styracosaurus, a dinosaur famous for its bony neck frill with spikes.  However, the left side of this bony frill looks very different from the right side of the frill.  The skull is asymmetrical.

Palaeontologist Scott Persons with the Skull of the Styracosaurus

An asymmetrical Styracosaurus skull.

Palaeontologist Scott Persons with his dog and the Styracosaurus skull.

Picture Credit: Scott Persons/University of Alberta

When scientists want to display a dinosaur in a museum, they often produce mirror images of bones to replace missing parts of the skeleton.  For example, if the right thigh bone is found but not the left, then a mirror image of the right thigh bone can be produced and used in the mounted display.  The discovery of this asymmetrical dinosaur skull demonstrates that the heads of dinosaurs could look very different.  The right side of the head looks very different from the left.  This has implications for how dinosaurs can be displayed in museums – producing mirror images of bones from the skull might not be as good an idea as previously thought.

In addition,  such variability in the skull and the way that it looks casts doubt over how some dinosaur species get named.  Sometimes a new species is erected based on subtle variations in the shape and structure of the skull.  If the dinosaurs had such extensive variations in the shape of the skulls, as this Styracosaurus fossil suggests, then some dinosaur species might be invalid.

13 11, 2019

Foundation Stage 2 – Animal Skeletons

By | November 13th, 2019|Early Years Foundation Reception|Comments Off on Foundation Stage 2 – Animal Skeletons

Foundation Stage 2 – Animal Skeletons

Whilst on a visit to a school to conduct a dinosaur themed workshop with some eager and excited Reception class children, our dinosaur expert spotted some super animal skeletons that the children had created.  Using straws and cotton buds to represent bones, the Foundation Stage 2 children had made skeletons of various animals.  The children had made skeletons of birds, people, cats, dogs and even a fish.

Anatomy Class – Reception Class Make Animal Skeletons

Reception class children make animal skeletons.

Colourful animal skeletons created by children in the Reception class.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The skeletons that the children had created certainly made a colourful display outside in the corridor adjacent to the hall where we were conducting our dinosaur and fossil themed workshop.

25 10, 2019

Reception Classes Create Prehistoric Landscapes

By | October 25th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Reception Classes Create Prehistoric Landscapes

The three classes of Reception-aged children at Broughton Primary in Flintshire have been busy learning all about dinosaurs and fossils this term.  With the half-term break approaching, a team member from Everything Dinosaur was invited into the school to deliver three dinosaur workshops, one for each class, to help reinforce their learning as the topic came to a conclusion.  During the visit, our dinosaur and fossil expert was given a tour of a couple of the spacious and tidy classrooms and shown the prehistoric landscapes that the children had created.

Class 1 (Dosbarth 1) – Prehistoric Landscape

Reception class children build their own "prehistoric park".

A very colourful prehistoric landscape created by a Reception class.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

What do Dinosaurs Need to Keep them Healthy and Happy?

As part of an enriched and varied scheme of work, the Reception classes have been learning about animals and what they need to help keep them safe, healthy and happy.  The children have incorporated some of this learning into their prehistoric landscapes that they have been building.  For example, class 1 ensured that there were plenty of plants for the herbivores to graze upon and lots of rocks for the dinosaurs to hide amongst to keep them safe from Tyrannosaurus rex.

As part of the extension activities for the classes following our workshops, we supplied extra resources for the teaching team.  Each class was given their very own hard hat to wear when they went out looking for fossils.  Dinosaurs as a term topic certainly lends itself to lots of creative play and exploration.

A Prehistoric Landscape Created by a Reception Class – Can you See the Three Fossil Hunting Hard Hats?

Class One build a dinosaur landscape.

The prehistoric scene created by a Reception class (Dosbarth 1).  The three fossil hard hats donated by Everything Dinosaur can be seen in the background.  These hard hats have a lamp on the front to help the children search for fossils.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

The enterprising teaching team had used a variety of materials to help create the mini “Jurassic Parks”, these items will help the children to explore and learn about the properties of different materials.  Class 3 had even included a large, cardboard and cloth cave for their dinosaur models to hide in.

The Prehistoric Landscape Created by Class 3 (Dosbarth 3)

Class 3 build their own prehistoric landscape.

The prehistoric landscape created by class 3.  A very colourful landscape for the dinosaur models to play in.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

Cretaceous Conifers

The children in class 3 had created a large cardboard and crepe paper forest for the plant-eating dinosaurs to browse.  The forest would provide lots of handy nesting places for the dinosaurs too.

Cretaceous Conifers – A Prehistoric Forest for Dinosaurs to Explore

A forest fit for dinosaurs.

Cardboard and crepe paper trees for the dinosaurs to hide amongst.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

For further information about Everything Dinosaur’s teaching work in schools and to enquire about a school visit: Contact Everything Dinosaur/Request a Quotation.

24 10, 2019

Reception Children Make Dinosaur Landscapes

By | October 24th, 2019|Early Years Foundation Reception|Comments Off on Reception Children Make Dinosaur Landscapes

Reception Children Make Dinosaur Landscapes

The children in the three Reception classes at Broughton Primary (Flintshire), have certainly enjoyed learning about dinosaurs this term.  A team member from Everything Dinosaur visited the school this morning to deliver three dinosaur and fossil themed workshops to help round off the scheme of work for the first half of the autumn term.

During the visit, our team member was shown some amazing dinosaur landscapes that the children had built.

Children in Class 1 (Reception) have Created a Prehistoric Landscape

The prehistoric landscape built by class 1 (Reception).

Dosbarth 1 (Class 1) had built their own prehistoric landscape.

Picture Credit: Dosbarth 1, Broughton Primary School

The Reception classes have been learning about animals and what they need to keep them safe and happy.  The children created a river to allow the dinosaurs to catch fish to eat.  The river would also provide water for the prehistoric animals to drink.  The plant-eating dinosaurs have plenty of leaves to chew but all the dinosaurs have to be careful as the volcano has erupted and bright red lava is spilling out down its slopes.

Class 1 Children Constructed a Volcano as part of their Dinosaur Landscape Project

A crepe paper volcano built by Reception children.

The volcano, part of the prehistoric landscape created by the Reception class children.

Picture Credit: Dosbarth 1, Broughton Primary School

Class 3 also constructed a home for their dinosaur models.  Their very own version of “Jurassic Park” included a big forest for the dinosaurs to hide in so that they felt safe and a huge cave for them to explore.  The hard hats we provided with the lamps on their front might come in handy when it comes to exploring the depths of the cavern.

The Prehistoric Scene Created by Class 3 (Dosbarth 3)

Reception class 3 and their prehistoric landscape.

The prehistoric scene created by class 3 (Dosbarth 3).

Picture Credit: Dosbarth 1, Broughton Primary School

The Reception classes enjoyed their dinosaur workshops and demonstrated some amazing counting and recall of dinosaur facts during the morning.  We hope they like the dinosaur hokey cokey activity we provided too.

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