All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Teaching

Everything Dinosaur team members working in schools, helping museums and other educational bodies. Our work with and in schools.

20 04, 2020

Thousands of Helpful and Informative Blog Posts

By | April 20th, 2020|General Teaching|Comments Off on Thousands of Helpful and Informative Blog Posts

4,750 Blog Posts to Help Teachers and those Home Schooling

Today, (April 20th, 2020), for many schools would have been the first day of the summer term.  However, in these extraordinary times (COVID-19), most of the schools in the UK and elsewhere in the world remain closed.  Teachers and teaching assistants and doing all they can to help with home schooling.  Parents and guardians too are in the unusual position of having to organise and manage the home schooling of children.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur have already supplied hundreds of helpful resources with a dinosaur or fossil theme to support science teaching.

The Everything Dinosaur blog has just passed the landmark of 4,750 articles.  These are on-line and free to access providing helpful information about fossil discoveries, research and prehistoric animals.

Celebrating 4,750 Articles on the Everything Dinosaur Weblog

Celebrating 4,750 weblog articles (Everything Dinosaur).

The Everything Dinosaur blog site has 4,750 articles for teachers, teaching assistants and home schoolers to access and they are all free to use.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Everything Dinosaur main blog site is crammed full with helpful information and of the 4,750 articles that have been posted up to date, there are 548 in the education category and a further 287 articles within the teaching category, providing yet more assistance and support as well as a wealth of information to permit the development of lesson plans.

The main blog site of Everything Dinosaur can be found here: Everything Dinosaur’s Main Blog Site.

There is no paywall, there are no fees to pay, each and every day a team member from Everything Dinosaur ensures that there is an article or feature posted up onto the site.  These are all free and available to be used to help support teaching work, lesson plans, subjects and topics.  Readers can use as many of these articles and features as they like.

Easy to Read, Informative and Helpful Articles

The blog certainly covers a wide range of dinosaur and fossil themed subjects.  For example, in the last week team members have produced posts explaining how aeronautical engineers are looking at the fossilised remains of flying reptiles to provide inspirational ideas on drone designs, a study of insect wing cases found in Switzerland has helped answer the question why are some insects iridescent?  Furthermore, the site has looked at Woolly Mammoths, Caribbean frogs, the origins and evolution of hominins and even provided a free crossword to download.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“As well as covering information about our business, the blog has been designed to provide a resource for teachers and the general public to help them learn more about the Earth sciences.  In these challenging times, this is a free-to-use resource that can help support teachers, academics and those people responsible for home schooling.”

With 4,750 articles it certainly is a large site providing support and assistance in these difficult times.

12 04, 2020

The Origins of the Easter Bunny

By | April 12th, 2020|General Teaching|Comments Off on The Origins of the Easter Bunny

Remarkable Rabbits

The rabbit, an animal often associated with this time of year (Easter), is not a rodent, although many members of the public think this chisel-toothed animal is.  After all, rodents have chisel-teeth too.  However, whilst both rodents and rabbits tend to be small, often burrow dwellers and herbivorous with ever-growing front incisors, there are notable differences.  For example, rabbits, hares and pikas (referred to as lagomorphs), have two pairs of upper chisel-like incisors whilst rodents only have one pair.  Rabbits also differ from rodents in that they have short tails, long ears that also help them to radiate excess heat as well as listen out for predators and long hind legs adapted to a jumping gait.

Although, they are related to rodents, where rabbits and their kin fit into the history of mammal evolution remains hotly debated.  The earliest fossils associated with these types of creatures date back to just a few million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs.  Whilst only two families of rabbits survive today – the Leporidae (hares and rabbits) and the Ochotonidae (pikas), in the past they were much more diverse and these animals have an extensive fossil record.

Some prehistoric rabbits were giants such as Nuralagus rex which inhabited the Spanish island of Menorca until about 3 million years ago.  This giant bunny is estimated to have weighed more than twenty kilograms and it was so large and heavy it probably lost the ability to hop.

A Comparison of the Giant Pliocene Rabbit Nuralagus rex with a Pet Rabbit

Nuralagus - giant prehistoric rabbit.

The giant Pliocene rabbit Nuralagus (N. rex) compared to a European rabbit.

Picture Credit: Mary Persis Williams

Rabbits might be associated with this time of year (Easter), but to a vertebrate palaeontologist, these lagomorphs have a long and diverse fossil record and some ancient rabbits were giants.

6 04, 2020

Not All Dinosaurs were Feathered

By | April 6th, 2020|General Teaching, Key Stage 3/4|Comments Off on Not All Dinosaurs were Feathered

There were Feathered Dinosaurs but not all Dinosaurs were Feathered

Research conducted by palaeontologists at the London Natural History Museum suggests that whilst dinosaurs that were closely related to modern birds (Aves), were probably feathered, other types of dinosaurs such as the Late Cretaceous horned dinosaurs and the duck-billed dinosaurs probably were not covered in feathers.  A book tracing the evolution of feathers is being written and as part of the background to this forthcoming publication, Professor Paul Barrett of the Museum conducted an evolutionary analysis looking at the preserved skin fossils of the 77 dinosaur species where evidence of skin has been preserved.

A Preserved Skin Impression from a Tyrannosaurus rex

T. rex skin impression fossil.

A skin impression associated with Tyrannosaurus rex.  Dinosaurs such as tyrannosaurs may have been feathered, at least whilst they were young animals but there are no signs of feathers or an integumentary covering associated with T. rex skin impressions.

Picture Credit: Biology Letters

Evidence of Reptilian Scaly Skins

The study suggests that the first types of dinosaurs were probably covered in scaly skin and not feathered.  Professor Barrett and his colleagues found no evidence of the earliest members of the Dinosauria being feathered.  Most of the fossil evidence supports the view that a specific proportion of the Theropoda (mostly meat-eating dinosaurs), the Coelurosauria – were feathered.  No evidence for a feathery covering in long-necked, plant-eaters (Sauropodomorpha) has been identified to date.

Sinosauropteryx – The First Dinosaur with Feathers to be Described

Sinosauropteryx fossil.

Sinosauropteryx fossil – the first feathered dinosaur to be described.  This small Chinese dinosaur is a member of the Coelurosauria clade of theropods, the group of theropods most closely associated with feathers.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The First Feathered Dinosaur Fossils were Found in China

Sinosauropteryx a feathered dinosaur.

Analysis of Sinosauropteryx fossil material suggests that this little dinosaur had ginger feathers.

Picture Credit: J. Robbins

The book is due to be published later on this year, a spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented that it would add to the growing list of books aimed at the general reader that helped to explain some of the areas of research currently being conducted on the Dinosauria.

For further articles about feathered dinosaurs and research:

Tyrannosaurus rex loses its feathers: T. rex Sheds its Feathers.

The origins of feathers: Feathers came first, then Birds Evolved.

Did all Dinosaurs have feathers? Did all Dinosaurs have Feathers?

Extension Ideas

  • What evidence can you find for dinosaurs having feathers?  Can you draw up a simplified family tree of the Dinosauria identifying which types of dinosaurs were feathered?
  • What are the reasons for large animals such as the sauropods probably not having a feathery covering?  A hint, think surface to volume ratios and how large animals need to prevent overheating.
  • Create a poster/chart comparing a bird to a meat-eating dinosaur.  What are the similarities, what are the differences?
  • Why do you think some dinosaurs were feathered?  Can you come up with a theory?
3 04, 2020

Everything Dinosaur Supporting Teachers and Home Educators

By | April 3rd, 2020|General Teaching, Key Stage 1/2|Comments Off on Everything Dinosaur Supporting Teachers and Home Educators

Everything Dinosaur Supporting Teachers and Home Educators

For the staff at Everything Dinosaur, the interests of our customers, our team members and our communities are at the very heart of all that we do.  At this particularly challenging time with the continuing Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, we want to do our best to help all those people having to teach children either at home or in school.

We want to let you know that you remain our top priority and we are doing all we can to assist schools, parents, guardians, nurseries and home educators.

To date, Everything Dinosaur has provided hundreds of free downloads of teaching materials and other resources.

Take for example, this free junior word search that we have been sending out.  Aimed at young children with a fascination for dinosaurs, our word search contains seven words associated with dinosaurs and prehistoric animals, can you find them all?

Everything Dinosaur Providing a Free Junior Dinosaur Themed Word Search Puzzle

A dinosaur themed word search puzzle.

Everything Dinosaur team members have created a junior dinosaur-themed word search puzzle.  It is available free of charge.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Benefits of Word Search Puzzles

Word games such as word search puzzles have many benefits.  Firstly, they assist with the development of pattern recognition, a key cognitive function in humans.  For young dinosaur fans, our word search also improves spelling, assists in vocabulary development and above all, it is fun.

The word search puzzle (and the answers), can be requested by simply emailing Everything Dinosaur: Email Everything Dinosaur to Request our Dinosaur Themed Word Search Puzzle.

A spokesperson for the UK-based company commented:

“Over the last few weeks, we have all been working very hard to support teachers and home educators.  With many children now at home and unable to go to school, we have been providing lots of helpful teaching resources and other learning materials to help assist with home schooling.”

Extension Idea

How about creating your own wordsearch?  It could be about dinosaurs or any other subject that you wish.  If you are learning about the Romans, why not try creating a Roman-themed word search that you can try out on a family member.  Perhaps, you could record the time it takes for each person to complete the challenge and create a chart to display the results.

28 03, 2020

Fossil Skull Reveals Origin of Modern Birds

By | March 28th, 2020|General Teaching, Key Stage 3/4|Comments Off on Fossil Skull Reveals Origin of Modern Birds

“Wonderchicken” Fossil Reveals Origin of Modern Birds

The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the very end of the Cretaceous, has been identified by an international team of palaeontologists led by researchers from the University of Cambridge.  Sophisticated CT scans (computerised tomography), of a limestone rock, not much bigger than a pack of cards, revealed the exquisitely preserved fossil skull.  Fragments of bone exposed on the rock’s surface suggested that there were more bones buried deep in the rock, but the scientists were not expecting to find the near perfect fossilised skull of a modern bird (neornithine), once the CT scans had been completed.

The bird has been nicknamed “wonderchicken” as its skull shows characteristics found in modern ducks and chickens.  This suggests it is close to the last common ancestor of these types of birds.

A Life Reconstruction of “Wonderchicken” – Asteriornis maastrichtensis

Life reconstruction - Asteriornis maastrichtensis .

Asteriornis maastrichtensis life reconstruction.

Picture Credit: Philip Krzeminski

The fossil comes from a limestone quarry on the Netherlands-Belgium border, making it the first modern bird from the age of dinosaurs to have been found in the northern hemisphere.

Named Asteriornis maastrichtensis, this quail-sized bird (to which it is distantly related), exhibits a previously undocumented combination of galliform-like (landfowl) and anseriform-like (waterfowl) anatomical traits.  Its presence alongside a previously reported Ichthyornis-like bird from the same quarry provides direct evidence of the co-occurrence of crown birds and avialan stem birds.

The Limestone Rock which Contains the Fossil Skull

The lump of limestone ontaining the skull of Asteriornis maastrichtensis.

The limestone containing the skull of Asteriornis maastrichtensis.

Picture Credit: Dr Daniel Field (Cambridge University)

Small Size Could Have Saved Modern Birds from Extinction

Asteriornis was quite small, certainly much smaller than the pterosaurs that it shared the skies with.  The fossil has been dated to 66.8-66.7 million years ago, a few hundred thousand years before the dinosaurs and lots of other animals including many types of bird, died out.

The authors of the scientific paper (published in the journal Nature), speculate that as it was small and it lived by the sea, this way of life, fitting a particular niche in the Late Cretaceous ecosystem, may have helped the ancestors of today’s birds to survive the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs.

26 03, 2020

Spotting a Diplodocus

By | March 26th, 2020|General Teaching|Comments Off on Spotting a Diplodocus

A Wild Safari Prehistoric World Diplodocus Dinosaur Model Spotted at an Exhibition

Whilst working at a library supporting the “Dippy the Diplodocus” nationwide tour, an eagle-eyed Everything Dinosaur team member spotted a Wild Safari Prehistoric World Diplodocus dinosaur model that was being used to help demonstrate what scientists think Diplodocus looked like when it roamed the Late Jurassic of western North America.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Diplodocus Dinosaur Model

A beautiful Diplodocus dinosaur model.

A beautiful model of a Diplodocus dinosaur helping to publicise the “Dippy on Tour” programme.  The replica is the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Diplodocus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Natural History Museum’s famous cast Diplodocus used to grace Hintze Hall at the Museum.  In January 2017, the skeleton was dismantled (all 292 bones of it) to make space for a new Blue Whale exhibit “Hope”.  This permitted the replica to go on a nationwide tour of the UK and Rochdale is just one of eight venues selected for this exhibition.  To date, over 100,000 people have visited the skeleton in Rochdale.  As well as the twenty-metre long replica itself, an exciting programme of events has been put together to help to inspire the next generation of young scientists.

Everything Dinosaur staff members have been providing expertise and assistance and have enjoyed helping to organise the family-themed science activities.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur, in between delivering fossil hunting workshops for the Borough Council as part of a series of outreach activities commented:

“The aim of this tour and the exhibition programme is to help inspire and enthuse the next generation of scientists.  The Diplodocus has also done a great deal to attract visitors to the area and to boost the local economy.  It is wonderful to see such nationally-important exhibits like “Dippy the Diplodocus” visiting the northwest of England”.

“Dippy the Diplodocus” can be seen at the Number One Riverside, Rochdale venue until June 28th (2020), with numerous other dinosaur themed events taking place in the Rochdale area for the duration of the exhibition.

Rochdale Borough Council has been able to source a wide range of dinosaur and prehistoric animal themed items to help support this exhibition.  Together with Everything Dinosaur team members the Council has been planning for the arrival of the famous sauropod for more than a year.  All the hard work has certainly paid off with over 100,000 visitors recorded to date.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World range is an award-winning range of prehistoric animal figures and replicas.  To see this range:
Safari Ltd – Wild Safari Prehistoric World Models.

25 03, 2020

Everything Dinosaur – Still Operating Amid Coronavirus Outbreak

By | March 25th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases, Teaching|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur – Far from Extinct

Dear Customers and Friends of Everything Dinosaur,

We are living in unprecedented times.  The COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic has global implications, we would once again, like to convey our thoughts and sympathies to all those people who have been affected by this virus.

Everything Dinosaur would like to extend our well wishes to each and every one of our customers and friends.  We want to pass on our thoughts and sympathies to all those people who have been affected by this outbreak.  This is a very difficult time for all of us.  We would like to briefly update you on the current situation at Everything Dinosaur.

We are far from extinct!  Whilst we are constantly reviewing advice received from the UK Government, the Chamber of Commerce and our Dept of Trade and Industry account manager, for the time being at least, our mail order business is operating as normal.

Business as Usual for Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur taking steps to ensure business as usual.

Everything Dinosaur has put in place a number of measures that means the company can operate the mail order business.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Customers Can Still Place Orders!

Everything Dinosaur is still operating!  The plans we put in place weeks ago have put us in a reasonable position when it comes to our mail order business.  Whilst we will always heed the advice of the Government and the Chamber of Commerce, we are still able to operate our mail order business.  Customers can still place orders; we are still despatching and our customers are receiving their parcels.

We don’t have a crystal ball, but because we have lots of contacts in China and elsewhere in the world, team members at Everything Dinosaur quickly became aware of the potential implications if the disease spread outside of Hubei Province (China).  We started to put plans in place back in January (2020), a rolling set of measures to support our staff, our customers, our suppliers and our local community.

Everything Dinosaur Putting Plans In Place to Manage in Difficult Times

Business as Usual at Everything Dinosaur.

Everything Dinosaur working hard to stay on top of the situation.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Preparations and Plans

The United Kingdom and much of the world, may now be in lockdown.  Everything Dinosaur began its preparations on a “just in case scenario” ten weeks ago.

These preparations included:

  • Cutting back on the amount of teaching work undertaken to permit more management time dedicated towards the mail order business.
  • Using stocks (purchased 2018 for outreach science programmes) of alcohol based hand sanitisers (some of which have already been donated to vulnerable members of the local community).
  • Deliberately building up stock of dinosaur models, figures and other items and ensuring that these could be packed and despatched from homes if needed.
  • Building up quantities of packaging supplies to help support the mail order operations.
  • Implementing stringent cleanliness regimes and social distancing.
  • Taking all essential steps to ensure the safety and protection of all Everything Dinosaur team members.
  • Switching shipment delivery addresses to permit stock to remain accessible to Everything Dinosaur team members.
  • Liaising closely with factories in order to put in place contingency plans to ensure continuity of stock.
  • Suspension of all but essential travel, suspension of all face-to-face meetings.
  • Postponement of outreach science programmes and dinosaur themed workshops.

In the last three weeks we have received a total of eighteen FEEFO reviews all of them rated Everything Dinosaur as a 5-star service provider.

We are still continuing to maintain the very highest levels of customer service.

Helping Out at Home

Lots of our customers have been in touch, with many of our customers having to stay at home, they have been looking for products and projects to help get them through these uncertain times.  We are should not overlook the mental health of those persons advised to self-isolate.  A hobby like dinosaur model collecting, model making, replica painting, building dioramas and so forth can play a significant part in helping with well-being.  We are also aware of the large numbers of children currently at home.

Keeping Children Occupied – Dinosaurs for Creative, Imaginative Play

Children playing with Schleich dinosaur and prehistoric animal models.

Children playing with dinosaur and prehistoric animal models.

Picture Credit: Schleich

Free Resources, Downloads, Fact Sheets, Games and Teaching Materials

It has always been our philosophy to support teachers, teaching assistants and home educators.  It is our belief that play is an essential part of childhood and the young people learn more whilst they are having fun.  A new dinosaur is named and described every two weeks or so.  There is always plenty to talk about when it comes to prehistoric animals.  In the light of the current situation, Everything Dinosaur acknowledges that some of our customers have additional needs and we have rolled out a programme of extra support and assistance.

  • Ensuring that everyone, not just schools have access to our free, educational downloads: General Teaching Resources.
  • Reception, nursery and Early Years Foundation Stage (ages 3-6) dinosaur themed teaching resources to download: Early Years Downloads.
  • Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 (ages 6 to 12) dinosaur and fossil themed teaching resources to download: Key Stage 1 and 2 Downloads.
  • Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 (ages 12 to 16) dinosaur and fossil themed teaching resources to download: Key Stage 3 and 4 Downloads.
  • The Everything Dinosaur teaching blog – hundreds of articles featuring advice, hints, lesson plans and other materials: Everything Dinosaur Teaching Blog.
  • In addition, there is this blog site, with over 4, 750 articles and features about prehistoric animals and fossil discoveries.
  • Over the last ten days, Everything Dinosaur has initiated a programme of sending out every day to a lucky customer a free Mojo Fun golden model.
  • Support for our customers with additional needs have been rolled out including surprise free gifts, learning materials and free downloads.
  • Sending out personalised projects and providing one-to-one support for parents of children/young people with an interest in fossils and dinosaurs.
  • Supplying free puzzles, games, top trumps, crosswords as part of a programme to help support families in lockdown.

Everything Dinosaur Has Launched a Programme of Supporting Families at Home

Teaching support from Everything Dinosaur.

Everything Dinosaur providing lots of free resources to support families.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur remains committed to doing all it can to help in the current difficult situation.  For the time being, we are able to operate our mail order business with the minimum of disruption.  Everything Dinosaur is far from extinct!

Keep well, stay safe!

20 03, 2020

Everything Dinosaur Continuing to Support Schools and Home Educators

By | March 20th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases, Teaching|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Continuing to Support Schools and Home Educators

At this time of uncertainty due to the coronavirus outbreak, Everything Dinosaur team members want to let you know how we are responding to the recent announcement about school closures. Our hearts go out to all those affected globally by the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis.  We are doing all we can to assist the education sector.  Everything Dinosaur is currently operating as normal and we intend to provide regular updates in what is a very fluid situation.  We are working very hard to limit the disruption to schools, nurseries and other academic bodies.

Everything Dinosaur has released the following statement:

Everything Dinosaur Team Members Helping to Support the Education Sector and Home Schooling

Everything Dinosaur supporting schools and home educators.

Everything Dinosaur team members working hard to support the educational sector and home schooling at this difficult time (coronavirus outbreak 2020).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The website links to gain access to our free teaching resources and other educational materials:

In addition, this blog site has posted up news stories, information about fossils, features about dinosaurs, evolution, natural selection, new theories and articles on other science related subject areas, every day since May 2007.  This is a resource that has over 4,750 articles, which are all free to access, helping to provide additional materials for teachers, teaching assistants, academics and home schoolers.

Furthermore, our hard-working and enthusiastic staff handle numerous email enquiries each day, providing advice, free prehistoric animal fact sheets and other resources.

Everything Dinosaur is working extremely hard to help support universities, colleges, nurseries, other academic bodies and home educators.  We continue to provide free of charge, a wide range of fossil and dinosaur themed teaching resources and learning materials.

19 03, 2020

Everything Dinosaur Supports Schools and Home Educators

By | March 19th, 2020|General Teaching|Comments Off on Everything Dinosaur Supports Schools and Home Educators

Everything Dinosaur Supports Schools and Home Educators

At Everything Dinosaur, the interests of our customers, our people and our communities are at the centre of everything we do and this is particularly important during these challenging times.  Our hearts go out to those affected globally by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.  We want to let you know that you remain our top priority and we are doing all we can to assist schools, universities, nurseries and home educators.

In the light of the recent announcement with regards to school closures, Everything Dinosaur has released the following statement:

Everything Dinosaur Helping to Support Education and Home Schooling

Everything Dinosaur support schools and home educators.

Everything Dinosaur supporting teaching in these difficult times (coronavirus outbreak 2020).  The company has built up a substantial inventory of free to use and free to download educational resources.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The links to the free to use downloads:

Furthermore, our dedicated staff handle dozens of email enquiries every day, providing advice, free prehistoric animal fact sheets and other resources.

In China, there is a saying “may you live in interesting times”.  These are certainly “interesting times”.  Everything Dinosaur is doing all it can to help support schools, other academic bodies and home educators.  We are currently operating as normal and will update you regularly with any changes.  We are all working together to help limit the disruption to our customers and to still provide our excellent award-winning service.

Everything Dinosaur is working extremely hard to help support schools, colleges, universities, nurseries, other academic bodies and home educators.  We continue to provide free of charge, a wide range of fossil and dinosaur themed teaching resources and learning materials.

17 03, 2020

Prehistoric Animal Drawings Help to Inspire Young Artists

By | March 17th, 2020|General Teaching|Comments Off on Prehistoric Animal Drawings Help to Inspire Young Artists

Prehistoric Animal Drawings Help to Inspire Young Artists

Everything Dinosaur team members have been asked to support the science outreach activities being organised by Rochdale Borough Council as the Natural History Museum’s “Dippy the Diplodocus” exhibition arrives in the northwest of England.  The Diplodocus exhibit, donated to the London Natural History Museum in 1905, is currently undergoing a nationwide tour.  Staff from Everything Dinosaur have been asked to put together a series of fun, fossil themed workshops in various parts of the northwest.

Whilst visiting a library, a team member spotted some very familiar prehistoric animal figures helping to promote a drawing competition aimed at eager, enthusiastic young palaeontologists.

Prehistoric Animal Model Help to Inspire Dinosaur Drawings

Prehistoric animals help to inspire young artists.

Prehistoric animal models help to inspire children’s dinosaur colour competition.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Prehistoric Life Liopleurodon and the CollectA Iguanodon

The model on the left of the photograph (above), is a Liopleurodon (marine reptile), from the CollectA Prehistoric Life range of figures.  The model on the right is that of an Iguanodon, also from the CollectA range.  Both these models represent long extinct creatures, fossils of which have been found in the British Isles.

A team member from Everything Dinosaur, in a break between delivering dinosaur and fossil themed workshops commented:

“It has been great to meet so many young dinosaur fans.  The Diplodocus event has attracted over a hundred thousand visitors to the area.  This has provided a real boost to the local economy.  We have seen a number of the entries in the dinosaur drawing competition and we have been most impressed with the illustrations and artwork.”

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