All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Teaching

Everything Dinosaur team members working in schools, helping museums and other educational bodies. Our work with and in schools.

25 10, 2019

Reception Classes Create Prehistoric Landscapes

By | October 25th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Reception Classes Create Prehistoric Landscapes

The three classes of Reception-aged children at Broughton Primary in Flintshire have been busy learning all about dinosaurs and fossils this term.  With the half-term break approaching, a team member from Everything Dinosaur was invited into the school to deliver three dinosaur workshops, one for each class, to help reinforce their learning as the topic came to a conclusion.  During the visit, our dinosaur and fossil expert was given a tour of a couple of the spacious and tidy classrooms and shown the prehistoric landscapes that the children had created.

Class 1 (Dosbarth 1) – Prehistoric Landscape

Reception class children build their own "prehistoric park".

A very colourful prehistoric landscape created by a Reception class.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

What do Dinosaurs Need to Keep them Healthy and Happy?

As part of an enriched and varied scheme of work, the Reception classes have been learning about animals and what they need to help keep them safe, healthy and happy.  The children have incorporated some of this learning into their prehistoric landscapes that they have been building.  For example, class 1 ensured that there were plenty of plants for the herbivores to graze upon and lots of rocks for the dinosaurs to hide amongst to keep them safe from Tyrannosaurus rex.

As part of the extension activities for the classes following our workshops, we supplied extra resources for the teaching team.  Each class was given their very own hard hat to wear when they went out looking for fossils.  Dinosaurs as a term topic certainly lends itself to lots of creative play and exploration.

A Prehistoric Landscape Created by a Reception Class – Can you See the Three Fossil Hunting Hard Hats?

Class One build a dinosaur landscape.

The prehistoric scene created by a Reception class (Dosbarth 1).  The three fossil hard hats donated by Everything Dinosaur can be seen in the background.  These hard hats have a lamp on the front to help the children search for fossils.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

The enterprising teaching team had used a variety of materials to help create the mini “Jurassic Parks”, these items will help the children to explore and learn about the properties of different materials.  Class 3 had even included a large, cardboard and cloth cave for their dinosaur models to hide in.

The Prehistoric Landscape Created by Class 3 (Dosbarth 3)

Class 3 build their own prehistoric landscape.

The prehistoric landscape created by class 3.  A very colourful landscape for the dinosaur models to play in.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

Cretaceous Conifers

The children in class 3 had created a large cardboard and crepe paper forest for the plant-eating dinosaurs to browse.  The forest would provide lots of handy nesting places for the dinosaurs too.

Cretaceous Conifers – A Prehistoric Forest for Dinosaurs to Explore

A forest fit for dinosaurs.

Cardboard and crepe paper trees for the dinosaurs to hide amongst.

Picture Credit: Broughton Primary (Flintshire)

For further information about Everything Dinosaur’s teaching work in schools and to enquire about a school visit: Contact Everything Dinosaur/Request a Quotation.

17 09, 2019

Preparing for a School Visit

By | September 17th, 2019|Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils, Teaching|0 Comments

Preparing for a Fossil Workshop

The autumn term is well underway and team members at Everything Dinosaur are busy conducting dinosaur themed and fossil workshops in schools, catering for a wide range of different age groups.  This week, our team members will be dealing with the eager and very excitable Early Years Foundation Stage classes (Nursery and Reception), as well as working with slightly more mature (we hope), students in Key Stages 3 and 4.

One of the things we have been asked to discuss with the students in year nine and ten that we will be working with this week, is potential career options in the Earth sciences.  This is certainly a very broad subject and we hope to provide some pointers.  We have been brushing up on our knowledge regarding career paths as well as brushing up some rather beautiful Dactylioceras ammonite fossils that we intend to use in a short exercise looking at taphonomy and the importance of index fossils.

Selecting Fossils to Use in Our Exercise with Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 Students

Ammonite fossils (Dactylioceras).

A selection of ammonite fossils to be used in an exercise exploring the role of index fossils with science students.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

12 09, 2019

Year 1 Children Find Fossils

By | September 12th, 2019|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Year 1 Children Find Fossils

The children in Year 1 at St Joseph’s Primary (Lancashire), had a morning of pretending to be palaeontologists as their autumn term topic “Dinosaur Planet” was kicked-off in style.  The friendly staff had prepared a scheme of work all about dinosaurs, an area of learning used elsewhere in the school, as the Nursery children (EYFS), would also be studying Tyrannosaurus rex, Triceratops, Stegosaurus et al over the course of the academic year.

Prior to our visit to conduct a morning of dinosaur and fossil themed activities with the enthusiastic children, the teaching team had challenged the class to record in their topic books what they knew about these long extinct animals.  Our dinosaur expert was impressed with the neatness of the handwriting, how well the letters had been formed and the appropriate finger spacing between words.

“Dinosaur Planet” – What I Know About Dinosaurs

At the start of the dinosaur topic the Year 1 children recorded what they know about dinosaurs.

At the start of the dinosaur topic the Year 1 children recorded what they know about dinosaurs.  For example, one pupil wrote that dinosaurs are related to reptiles – that’s right, the Dinosauria are indeed a diverse group of reptiles.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Why Did Diplodocus Have a Long Neck?

As part of the writing exercise, referred to as KWL:

  • what I know?
  • what I want to know?
  • what have I learned?  An opportunity to check understanding at the end of the topic.

The year 1 children wanted to know why did a Diplodocus have a long neck?

Why Did a Diplodocus Have a Long Neck?

CollectA rearing Diplodocus dinosaur figure.

During the morning of dinosaur themed activities, the school visitor from Everything Dinosaur made sure to answer the question about the neck of Diplodocus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The first part of the morning involved visual and kinaesthetic learning with lots of physical exercises to help reinforce learning.  In the second part of the workshop, which was conducted in the classroom, the children were given the opportunity to find their own fossils.  The eager young palaeontologists found lots of fossils in our special challenge, teeth from prehistoric sharks, pieces of fossilised turtle shell, lots of ammonites and even some armour from a Jurassic crocodile!

The Children Demonstrated Lots of Pre-knowledge

Year 1 KWL exercise at the start of the dinosaur term topic.

KWL exercise (Year 1 term topic).  The Year 1 children were keen to demonstrate their knowledge about dinosaurs, even a Gallimimus was mentioned.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We are confident that the budding young palaeontologists at St Joseph’s Primary are going to really enjoy their autumn term topic.

3 09, 2019

Colourful Creative Dinosaurs

By | September 3rd, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Colourful Creative Dinosaurs

Our thanks to young Nataliya (Year 2), who sent into Everything Dinosaur a beautiful illustration of a dinosaur that she had designed following a visit to her school by one of our team members.  Nataliya and her classmates had taken up our challenge to design a dinosaur as part of an extension exercise that arose following one of our dinosaur and fossil workshops at the school.  The dinosaur was named “spikeraptor” and despite its fearsome name, Nataliya explained that this dinosaur was a herbivore and even included a picture of some leaves that the dinosaur was grazing upon in her prehistoric portrait.

A Colourful Dinosaur Design – “Spikeraptor”

A colourful green dinosaur - Spikeraptor the product of the imagination of young Nataliya (Key Stage 1).

A colourful green dinosaur – Spikeraptor the product of the imagination of young Nataliya (Year 2).

Picture Credit: Nataliya (Key Stage 1) and Everything Dinosaur

Lovely Labels!

As part of a writing exercise we asked the children to label their prehistoric animal’s body parts.  Nataliya was keen to emphasis the spikes and prickles on her dinosaur and our congratulations to Nataliya and the rest of the class for sending in some super drawings with fantastic examples of handwriting.  These drawings have made our day and we shall post them up in our warehouse so that all the Everything Dinosaur team members can view them.

20 06, 2019

Dinosaur Drawings and Letters from Year 2 (Great Wood Primary School)

By | June 20th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Dinosaur Drawings and Letters from Year 2 (Great Wood Primary School)

Our thanks to the budding scientists at Great Wood Primary School in Morecambe (Lancashire), who sent into our offices some wonderful dinosaur illustrations and a set of beautifully written letters explaining how much they enjoyed their recent dinosaur workshop with one of our team members.  As part of our extension activity suggestions with the Year 2 classes we challenged them to design their very own prehistoric animal.  We received lots of amazing dinosaur designs.

A Selection of Letters from the Children – Some Featured Illustrations of Imaginary Prehistoric Animals

Letters from Year 2 children.

A selection of letters received from the eager young palaeontologists at Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe, Lancashire).

Picture Credit: Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe)

Writing Thank You Letters

The teachers very kindly sent in thank you letters that the children had written.  Writing a thank you letter to Everything Dinosaur is a great way for the teaching team to check learning and understanding following a recounting activity.  This letter writing exercise helps young learners practice sentence sequencing, planning their composition, as well as spelling and the layout and format of a letter.  The children can also read their letters out aloud as part of a further teaching activity within the classroom.

A Very Colourful Dinosaur Design with Lots of Wonderful Labels

Year 2 children draw dinosaurs.

A very colourful prehistoric animal produced by a Year 2 child at Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe).

Picture Credit: Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe)

Children Produced Letters and Drawings

Dinosaur drawing and letter, Year 2.

Jessica’s dinosaur drawing and letter (Year 2 at Great Wood Primary School).

Picture Credit: Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe)

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We try to provide additional teaching resources when we visit a school to deliver a dinosaur themed workshop.  In addition, during our workshop with the class the opportunity often arises to challenge the children to produce a piece of work, such as their very own dinosaur design or to write a thank you letter.  In this way, we are providing extension ideas to the teaching team and supporting the teacher’s scheme of work.”

A Very Spiky Dinosaur Design

Dinosaur illustration from Stacey (Year 2).

Stacy chose to draw a green, armoured dinosaur with a very spiky tail.

Picture Credit: Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe)

Our thanks once again to the teaching team and the children in Year 2 at Great Wood Primary School for taking the time and trouble to send into us examples of their work.  Congratulations to you all!

Dinosaurs with Spiky Tails was a Common Characteristic Amongst the Children’s Dinosaur Designs

Dinosaur illustration (Alice in Year 2)

A colourful dinosaur drawing from Alice in Year 2 at Great Wood Primary School).

Picture Credit: Great Wood Primary School (Morecambe)

6 06, 2019

Giant Dinosaur Footprint Found in Playground

By | June 6th, 2019|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|2 Comments

Giant Dinosaur Footprint Spotted at School

Pupils at Newport Infant School (Shropshire), are studying dinosaurs and prehistoric animals over the next two weeks.  The schoolchildren discovered a huge three-toed dinosaur footprint in their well-kept and spacious playground at the start of the week.  With the help of the dedicated and enthusiastic teaching team the pupils decided that the giant track must have been made by a dinosaur!

A Giant Dinosaur Footprint Discovered in the School Playground

Huge dinosaur footprint spotted at a school.

A huge dinosaur footprint spotted at a school.

Picture Credit: Newport Infant School/Everything Dinosaur

Mr Remington, the school caretaker took the precaution of sealing off that part of the playground and the children became “dinosaur detectives” as they tried to work out what kind of dinosaur had paid them a visit.  The footprint is just one of the many creative dinosaur and prehistoric animal themed activities that the staff have planned for the children.  All the school is involved from Reception to the Year 2 classes and Everything Dinosaur had been invited into the school to deliver a series of workshops with the budding young palaeontologists.

During the workshops the children demonstrated some amazing knowledge and were happy to explain about dinosaurs and to discuss dinosaur facts.  Some of the children in the Reception classes had even brought in numerous dinosaur books from home to show our dinosaur expert.

We hope the additional teaching resources and extension materials that we supplied helps to support the school’s creative and challenging scheme of work.

19 04, 2019

Preparing for a Question and Answer Session with Year 2

By | April 19th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Preparing for a Question and Answer Session with Year 2

This week, sees the beginning of the summer term for schools in the UK.  Everything Dinosaur team members have a very congested programme of dinosaur and fossil workshops to look forward to over the next few weeks and in a few days a member of staff will be visiting a school in Lancashire to conduct a series of workshops with Year 2 classes.  As part of a busy morning of dinosaur and fossil themed activities, the teaching team have requested that we participate in a question and answer session with the budding, eager palaeontologists.  The children will, no doubt, pose some challenging and intriguing questions to our dinosaur expert, however, we have prepared a special question just for them as part of our programme of suggested extension activities.

Our question for the Key Stage 1 children (Year 2) – how did dinosaurs keep themselves clean?

Did Dinosaur Preen their Feathers just like Birds?

Mei long illustration.

Did dinosaurs preen their feathers like modern birds?  If many dinosaurs were feathered, how did they keep their feathers clean?

Outlining the Extension Activity

Fossil bones and teeth can provide palaeontologists with lots of information about extinct animals, but evidence from body fossils can’t tell us much about how animals that lived in the past behaved.  Trace fossils preserve evidence of the activity of animals, such as tracks, burrows, trails and borings.  From this data, scientists can infer behaviour such as dinosaurs moving in a herd, based on fossilised footprints indicating the same type of animals all moving at the same pace in the same direction.  However, there is very little evidence preserved in the fossil record about how extinct animals kept themselves clean.

Did Sauropod Dinosaurs Wallow in Mud Like Some Large Mammals?

How did dinosaurs keep themselves clean?

If large mammals like extant elephants wallow in mud then perhaps large Sauropod dinosaurs behaved in a similar way.

Our Challenge to the Year 2 Classes

In order to answer some of these questions about the behaviour of dinosaurs, palaeontologists examine the behaviours of animals alive today that are related to the Dinosauria.  By observing how birds and reptiles keep themselves clean, then perhaps the likely behaviours of dinosaurs can be deduced or inferred.

Can the Year 2 children conduct research into how living animals keep themselves clean?  Can they transfer this knowledge to the extinct members of the Dinosauria and suggest ways that different dinosaurs such as Apatosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex kept clean?

Extensions

As with all our dinosaur and fossil workshops in school, we like to provide lots of extension ideas to the teaching team.

  • What can the children do to help the animals that live around the school to help them keep clean?  For example, providing a shallow tray filled with water to make a bird bath – linking to the English national curriculum science syllabus – living things and habitats.
  • Why do we need to keep clean?  Why is it important to brush our teeth?  A link to hygiene and personal development.

For further information about the dinosaur and fossil workshops conducted in schools by Everything Dinosaur team members: Email Everything Dinosaur About School Workshops

21 03, 2019

A Recipe for Dinosaur Shortbread Biscuits

By | March 21st, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Press Releases, Teaching|0 Comments

Dinosaur Shortbread Biscuits Recipe

Here is a quick and simple recipe to make dinosaur shortbread biscuits.  Making biscuits such as these is a fun activity that young children can participate in.  These dinosaur shortbread biscuits make great treats or can be used to help with the catering for a dinosaur themed birthday party.

A Recipe for Dinosaur Shortbread Biscuits

Dinosaur shortbread biscuits recipe.

A recipe for dinosaur shortbread biscuits.  A simple biscuit recipe that is a great idea for a dinosaur themed birthday party – perfect for prehistoric party fun!

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Ingredients (Makes about Twenty Biscuits)

  • Butter or margarine 110 grammes (4oz)
  • Caster sugar 50 grammes (2oz)
  • Plain flour, sifted 175 grammes (6oz)
  • Extra caster sugar for dusting

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 150°C /300°F (Gas mark 2).  Lightly grease two baking sheets.
  2. Begin by first beating the butter (or margarine) with a wooden spoon to a soft consistency, and then beat in the sugar, followed by the sifted flour.
  3. Still using the wooden spoon, start to bring the mixture together, then finish off with your hands to form a paste.
  4. Transfer the mixture to a board lightly dusted with caster sugar, and then quickly and lightly roll it out to about 1/8 inch (3mm) thick (dusting the rolling pin with sugar if necessary).
  5. Cut the biscuits out using dinosaur biscuit cutters or, a dinosaur-shaped card that acts as a template and then arrange them on the baking sheet and bake on a highish shelf in the oven for 30 minutes.  Cool the biscuits on a wire rack, dust them with some caster sugar, and store in an airtight tin to keep them crisp.
  6. Once cooled, the biscuits can be iced and decorated to make a fun dinosaur themed snack or an ideal party food for a prehistoric animal themed party or other special occasion.

Dinosaur Biscuits – Just Out of the Oven

Dinosaur biscuits

Dinosaur biscuits cooling on a wire rack.  Once cooled, these biscuits can be decorated.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Everything Dinosaur weblog is crammed full of helpful articles aimed at the parents, grandparents and guardians of dinosaur enthusiasts and budding, young palaeontologists.  If you search our blog using terms such as “dinosaur party”, “cake” and “biscuit”, you will discover lots of helpful articles, ideas, recipes and suggestions to assist you with dinosaur themed party planning and other fun prehistoric animal orientated activities.  Have fun!

Everything Dinosaur is a UK-based supplier of dinosaur and prehistoric animal themed models, toys and merchandise, check-out our website: Visit Everything Dinosaur

12 03, 2019

Year 5 (Jurassic World)

By | March 12th, 2019|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Year 5 Classes Explore Dinosaurs and Extinction

Children in Year 5 at Oasis Academy Short Heath (West Midlands), have been learning all about dinosaurs, prehistoric animals and extinction in their spring term topic.  With the help of the enthusiastic teaching team, the two classes have been studying prehistoric animals and linking this topic area to key parts of the national curriculum, such as English, mathematics, geography and science.  Recently, the children had been looking at electricity and learning about conductors.  When holding a cold fossil, heat (thermal energy), is conducted from your warm hand to the cold fossil.  The heat flows from the person to the colder object, this little exercise essentially helps to support learning about how heat is transferred and what makes a good conductor.  It links to the second law of thermodynamics helping to explain the properties of materials.

During our workshops with the class we explored the properties of fossils and what they can tell us about life in the past.

Year 5 Children Learning About Prehistoric Animals

Dinosaur poster (Year 5)

Lots of facts and information about prehistoric animals.

Picture Credit: Year 5 Oasis Academy Short Heath

English Curriculum – A Balanced Argument

Under the expert tutelage of the Year 5 teaching team there was plenty of evidence in support of cross-curricular activities on display in the spacious and tidy classrooms.  The Everything Dinosaur team member who visited the school to deliver the dinosaur and fossil workshops, spotted some super science posters that the children had prepared and during the workshop, the idea of bringing back the extinct Woolly Mammoth (M. primigenius) was proposed.  Would it be a good idea to make an animal  de-extinct?  This links with an aspect of the English curriculum, introducing the idea of a balanced argument.  Could the class debate the advantages and disadvantages of introducing a genetically modified elephant breeding programme to create shaggy coated elephants?

How to Clone a Mammoth – Linking to a Balanced Argument Exploring Pros and Cons

The science behind de-extinction.

The science of de-extinction by Beth Shapiro.  A recipe book for bringing back extinct animals.

Picture Credit: Princeton Press

Art and Design Dinosaurs

Many of the children had been inspired to create their very own dinosaur themed pieces of art.  There were some wonderful examples of prehistoric animal models on display in the classrooms.  Toni had created her very own blue and pink dinosaur egg, which when carefully opened revealed a baby Triceratops inside.  The children studied Triceratops (T. horridus) and had a go at scientific working to see if they could come up with a theory as to why palaeontologists have skull bones of this horned dinosaur but few examples of limb bones to study.

Lots of Beautiful Dinosaur Themed Artworks on Display

Year 5 and a beatuiful dinosaur egg.

A beautiful blue and pink dinosaur egg on display.

Picture Credit: Toni (Year 5 Oasis Academy Short Heath)

The class were intrigued to hear that recent research by scientists had led to the idea that dinosaur eggs may have been coloured and not just plain white or cream.  German scientists had studied the eggs of a little dinosaur from China and found evidence of the remains of pigments within the fossil eggshell, one of the pigments identified would have given the dinosaur eggs a bluish colour.  The colour scheme chosen by Toni for her Triceratops egg is therefore highly appropriate.

Some Very Large Dinosaur Models on Display

Oasis Academy (Short Heath) Year 5 and their dinosaur themed crafts.

Year 5 children at Oasis Academy Short Heath get creative during their term topic about dinosaurs.

 

Picture Credit: Year 5 Oasis Academy Short Heath

We hope the extension ideas and suggestions we provided help with the teaching scheme of work as the budding young palaeontologists explore themes such as evolution and extinction over the rest of the term.  The children certainly enjoyed the workshops and challenged their visitor with some amazing questions that they had prepared.

9 03, 2019

The CollectA Rearing Diplodocus – Demonstrates Niche Partitioning

By | March 9th, 2019|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Teaching|0 Comments

The CollectA Rearing Diplodocus – Niche Partitioning

The beautifully sculpted and skilfully painted CollectA rearing Diplodocus dinosaur model helps us to demonstrate a concept called niche partitioning.  The term niche partitioning is used by ecologists to explain how organisms use the resources in an environment differently to avoid competition and therefore, by doing this, they can all co-exist.  Diplodocus is known to have co-existed with several other long-necked dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic, but they were able to share the same environment as they very probably fed on different types of vegetation.  They were probably not directly competing with each other for resources.

The CollectA rearing Diplodocus can be posed in a rearing position, as if it is reaching high into the upper canopy of a forest in order to reach the leaves and branches at the very top of the trees that other dinosaurs could not reach.  We created a short video (45 seconds), that demonstrates how the CollectA Diplodocus can be balanced to demonstrate niche partitioning.

The CollectA Diplodocus Demonstrates Niche Partitioning in the Sauropoda

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Providing a Challenge to Schoolchildren During a Dinosaur Workshop

When Everything Dinosaur team members visit schools, we explain this concept using dinosaurs as an example and then challenge the class to think of examples of niche partitioning within modern ecosystems.  This helps reinforce understanding about food chains/food webs and how ecosystems are constructed.  It also helps to demonstrate an important principle in palaeontology, the idea that we use comparisons from living creatures and environments today to help us understand life in the ancient past.

A Sauropod Dinosaur Rears Up

A long-necked dinosaur rears up.

A rearing Sauropod.  As well as reaching food, the ability to rear could have had a secondary function as a defensive response to an attack from a predator.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

Niche Partitioning

Many types of extant herbivorous animal, normally quadrupedal, are able to rear up onto their hind legs in order to reach food that otherwise they would not be able to access.  As an extension to this exercise in schools, we ask the pupils to construct food webs to reflect how the chosen ecosystem functions.

A Gerenuk Antelope Feeding

A Gerenuk antelope.

A South African antelope a Gerenuk rears up to reach foliage.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our team members have posted up numerous articles exploring this topic area on this blog.

To read an article about niche partitioning within Jurassic marine environments: Marine Reptile Teeth Tell the Tale of Changing Seas

An examination of why the Cretaceous of northern Africa seems to have had large numbers of super-sized predators: Why so Many Large Predators in Cretaceous Africa?

The CollectA Rearing Diplodocus Dinosaur Model

CollectA have included several Sauropod figures within their “Prehistoric Life” model range.  The CollectA rearing Diplodocus model is one of the larger figures within this not-to-scale range, with a rearing height of approximately 23 centimetres.

The CollectA Diplodocus Dinosaur Model

CollectA rearing Diplodocus dinosaur figure.

The CollectA rearing Diplodocus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the CollectA rearing Diplodocus and the other CollectA models available from Everything Dinosaur: The CollectA Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Model range

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