All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
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Photographs and pictures of products featured on the Everything Dinosaur website. Everything Dinosaur a UK based retailer of dinosaur models, toys and games. This category features pictures of products that are or were on the company’s website.

12 08, 2018

In Praise of “Meg”

By | August 12th, 2018|Animal News Stories, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Movie Reviews and Movie News, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Megalodon Makes it to the Big Screen

This weekend sees the opening of the summer blockbuster “Meg”, a prehistoric shark-based action movie featuring Jason Statham and a twenty-five-metre-long representation of Carcharocles megalodon – Megalodon, an extinct species of prehistoric shark, so famous that it is just known by its specific or trivial name.  With the film likely to make in excess of £30 million in box office receipts on just its opening weekend in the USA, the movie, which incidentally is the most expensive shark film ever made (estimated budget of around $130 million USD), is likely to be a runaway box office success.  However, this iconic marine monster is well and truly extinct, it really is “safe to enter the water” to borrow a strapline from perhaps, the best-known and best-loved shark movie of them all, the 1975 “Jaws”.

Warner Bros and director Jon Turteltaub may have resurrected Megalodon, but most palaeontologists will confidently tell you that, what was probably the largest carnivorous shark to have existed, died out around 2.6 million years ago.

When those talented people as Safari Ltd introduced a “Megalodon” model back in 2014, Everything Dinosaur put together a short video introduction to the model.

Everything Dinosaur’s Video Review of the Wild Safari Dinos Megalodon Model

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We may have lacked the budget of the movie and unfortunately, we were unable to afford the services of Jason Statham, but our six minute video review set out to explain a little more about the science behind this prehistoric shark and to provide a guide to the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Megalodon model.

Carcharocles megalodon

Many marine biologists had believed that Carcharocles megalodon was closely related to the modern Great White Shark – Carcharodon carcharias (hence Everything Dinosaur’s original research into finding a suitable Megalodon model).  However, recent studies suggest that it was actually a member of another sub-branch of the Lamniformes Order and that Megalodon was a member of the Otodontidae family and not a member of the Lamnidae family as previously thought.  It may have had a similar lifestyle and habit to the Great White Shark and it was much bigger and heavier, but it was unlikely to have been around twenty-five metres in length, the size of Megalodon in the movie.

A Still from the Motion Picture “Meg”

Meglaodon from the movie "Meg".

A still from the 2018 summer blockbuster “Meg”.

Picture Credit: Warner Bros

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“If these giant, prehistoric sharks were still around today, then, as we suspect they were shallow water specialists living in the top two hundred metres of water, the upper portions of the epipelagic zone of the ocean, then they certainly would have been spotted by now.  The “Meg” is very much extinct and we are sure that the film will provide plenty of thrills and spills for cinema goers.  Perhaps, it will also raise awareness amongst its audience about the plight of many shark species today.  Over fishing, habitat loss and pollution are having a devastating effect on global shark populations.  It has been estimated that some 100 million sharks die each year, with luck this movie will raise awareness about shark species conservation.”

The Jaws of Megalodon

Megalodon jaws.

Reconstructed jaws of a Megalodon shark (human gives scale).

Picture Credit: Rex Features

Safari Ltd have produced an excellent replica of this prehistoric shark, to view the model and the rest of the amazing figures in the Wild Safari Dinos Prehistoric World collection: Safari Ltd. Wild Safari Prehistoric World

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Megalodon Figure 

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Megalodon model.

Fearsome C. megalodon

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

10 08, 2018

The Really Dangerous Predator of Hell Creek

By | August 10th, 2018|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|1 Comment

Acheroraptor temertyorum – Most Dangerous Critter of Hell Creek

If you could travel back in time and visit western North America 66 million years ago, you might find yourself within the territory of a Tyrannosaurus rex.  Not a very safe place to be you might think, you would probably be right, but the Hell Creek fauna contained another Theropod dinosaur, one that was perhaps, more dangerous to a human visitor than a T. rex or for that matter the other apex predator known from the Hell Creek Formation – Dakotaraptor steini.

Named and scientifically described in 2013, the real man-eater of Hell Creek might have been Acheroraptor (A. temertyorum), at around three metres long and weighing as much as a German Shepherd dog, a pack of these ferocious hunters would probably have made short work of any human visitor to the Late Cretaceous who was unfortunate to encounter them.

A Scale Drawing of the Velociraptorine Dromaeosaurid Acheroraptor temertyorum

Acheroraptor temertyorum scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Acheroraptor.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

“Underworld Plunderer”

Named after the River of Pain “Acheron” in the underworld from Greek myth, Acheroraptor was one of the very last of the non-avian Theropod dinosaurs and it probably played a secondary predator role in the Hell Creek ecosystem.  There were larger predators, the five-and-a-half-metre-long Dakotaraptor for example, that like Acheroraptor was one of the very last dromaeosaurids to evolve.  However, packs of Dakotaraptors and the iconic Tyrannosaurus rex may not have considered a single person much of meal and may not have expanded a lot of energy in trying to catch them.  To a pack of Acheroraptors, a human would have made a very satisfactory lunch, best to avoid Acheroraptor if you can.

To read more about the discovery of Dakotaraptor steiniDakotaraptor – A Giant Raptor

Some of the Typical Dinosaurian Fauna of the Hell Creek Formation (Maastrichtian Faunal Stage of the Late Cretaceous)

Dinosaurs of the Hell Creek Formation.

Typical dinosaurs of the Hell Creek Formation.   Although there were larger predators, to a person visiting Montana 66 million years ago, meeting a pack of Acheroraptors would have been extremely dangerous.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Part of the Vertebrate Fossil Collection at the Royal Ontario Museum

The specific or trivial name “temertyorum” was selected to honour James and Louise Temerty in recognition for their outstanding support and contribution to the Royal Ontario Museum, which houses the jaw fragments that led to the scientific description of this dinosaur back in 2013.  Acheroraptor probably lived in packs and may have had a role similar to extant hyenas or jackals in present-day ecosystems.  Palaeontologists had suspected that dromaeosaurids roamed Montana in very last years of the Cretaceous, numerous teeth with their diagnostic wide ridges (denticles) had been discovered, but the lack of fossilised bones prevented scientists from assigning a genus.

The Holotype Fossil Maxilla and Lower Jaw (Dentary) of Acheroraptor

The fossilised jawbones of Acheroraptor.

The jaws of Acheroraptor.

Picture Credit: Royal Ontario Museum

Acheroraptor More Closely Related to Asian Dromaeosaurids

Palaeontologists have concluded that Acheroraptor was more closely related to Asian dromaeosaurids such as Velociraptor (V. mongoliensis), than it was to other North American dromaeosaurids.  Assigned to the Velociraptorinae subfamily of the Dromaeosauridae, the relatively long-snouted Acheroraptor provides supporting evidence to suggest the presence of a Late Cretaceous land bridge between Asia and North America.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur explained:

“There is a considerable amount of evidence that supports the idea of the existence of a Cretaceous Beringian land bridge linking North America and Asia.  This land bridge may not have been permanent but appeared at times when sea levels fell, permitting a faunal exchange between dinosaur-based ecosystems.  The ancestors of Acheroraptor temertyorum probably migrated into North America.”

To read Everything Dinosaur’s recent article about Alaskan trace fossils providing evidence of a mixing of dinosaur faunas from Asia and North America: Did Alaskan Therizinosaurs and Hadrosaurs Live Together?

Beasts of the Mesozoic 1/6th Scale Acheroraptor temertyorum

There are lots of models of the Hell Creek Formation biota available, countless T. rex and Triceratops figures for instance, but it was the clever and talented David Silva of Creative Beast Studio who created a 1/6th scale replica of Acheroraptor within the amazing “Beasts of the Mesozoic” model range.

The “Beasts of the Mesozoic” Acheroraptor temertyorum Figure

Beasts of the Mesozoic Acheroraptor temertyorum figure.

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Acheroraptor model.

To view the beautiful Acheroraptor model and the rest of the figures in the “Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptor” range: Beasts of the Mesozoic “Raptors”

7 08, 2018

In Praise of the CollectA Deluxe 1:20 Scale Dunkleosteus

By | August 7th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Product Reviews|0 Comments

Praising the CollectA Deluxe 1:20 Scale Dunkleosteus Model

CollectA have stated that they intend to introduce more figures and replicas that represent animals from the Palaeozoic into their model range.  True to their word, 2018 has seen the introduction of a Dimetrodon along with an Estemmenosuchus, models of animals that lived during the Permian.  In addition, CollectA have added a 1:20 scale Dunkleosteus to their Deluxe range.

The Dunkleosteus figure has attracted a lot of praise from model collectors and from curators of vertebrate fossil collections around the world.

The CollectA Dunkleosteus Model Compared to a Museum Specimen

The CollectA 1:20 scale Dunkleosteus compared to a museum specimen.

A comparison between the new for 2018 CollectA 1;20 scale replica of Dunkleosteus and a museum specimen.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture (above), shows a close-up view of the anterior portion of the new for 2018 CollectA Dunkleosteus model (left).  The use of gloss on the figure gives this model an attractive wet-look, very appropriate for a Late Devonian marine predator.  To the right, is a photograph of a Dunkleosteus exhibit on display at the Senckenberg Naturmuseum Frankfurt in Germany.  The production team at CollectA have taken great care to depict the famous jaws and the bony head shield of this prehistoric fish accurately.

Dunkleosteus is a member of the Placodermi (plated skins), a Class of armoured fish, that was extremely varied, geographically widespread and specious.

Huge Skull Plates and Shears for Jaws

Although Dunkleosteus (D. terrelli), is regarded as an iconic animal in the fossil record, it is only known from its massive skull plates and shear-like jaws, although recently, some details were published on the discovery of a fragmentary piece of fossilised cartilage associated with supporting the tail (ceratotrichia).  The rest of the animal, its backbone, soft tissues, the shape of its fins and tail are not known.  In order to produce a 1:20 scale model, the designer at CollectA has had to make an educated guess about the body plan of Dunkleosteus.

Designer Anthony Beeson got inspiration from other Devonian Placoderms as well as using living fish when it came to devising the shape of the CollectA model.

The CollectA Deluxe Dunkleosteus Figure

CollectA Dunkleosteus.

CollectA 1:20 scale Deluxe Dunkleosteus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The bony plates and jaws that have been preserved give scientists an impression of what the front of this fish looked like, but the remainder, more than two thirds of the entire animal is simply not known to science.  The CollectA model has been given a short, but broad dorsal fin.  Other better known and much smaller Placoderms had similarly shaped dorsal fins.  These fishes also possessed paired pelvic and pectoral fins, so the CollectA model has been provided with these as well.

The CollectA figure has been given a heterocercal tail.  Heterocercal tails are not symmetrical.  The vertebrae extend into the top lobe of the tail and this makes it longer than the lower or ventral lobe.  Heterocercal tails are known in members of the Placodermi and these types of tails are also found in many species of shark.  The CollectA Dunkleosteus tail has some nicks in both the top and ventral lobe, typical wear and tear as expected in the fins of an apex predator and from a fish that may have been subject to attack from members of its own species (intraspecific combat).

A View of the Heterocercal Tail of the CollectA Dunkleosteus Model

The tail of the CollectA Dunkleosteus.

The CollectA Dunkleosteus has been given a heterocercal tail.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Head Shield Covered in Skin

The huge bony plates that covered the anterior portion, of what many scientists have described as the world’s first vertebrate super-predator, are frequently described as armour.  The head was actually covered by a tough skin, as much as eight centimetres thick in some areas.  The headshield very probably did provide protection, but they also served as anchor points for the huge muscles needed to power the jaws of this prehistoric fish.

Recent research undertaken by the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (Ohio), that houses an extensive collection of Placoderm fossils, indicates that Dunkleosteus had a very powerful bite, at least as powerful as that of top aquatic predators today such as alligators and sharks.

Commenting on the shape of the figure, including the raised area immediately behind the jaws, designer Anthony Beeson stated:

“The hump (which isn’t supposed to be anything of the sort), is simply the result of having the bony skull embedded in the body of the Dunkleosteus, rather than to just have it resting on the surface of the fish like a suit of armour as other firms have done.  If there is a resulting hump that is purely my take on how it may have appeared.  As the skull is the only thing preserved in the fossil record the rest of the animal is pure speculation as any artist or modeller has to do.  No one for instance is certain on how the tail may have looked.  One has to look at contemporary and modern species and also think what will make the model attractive both visually and touch-wise.  The skin ornamentations are not scutes, but I based them on the skin of the Devonian fossil fish Gemuendina and other skin decoration on those of large modern fishes such as the Wolf Fish.”

To view the CollectA Dunkleosteus and the other figures in the CollectA Deluxe model range: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Life Models

4 08, 2018

CollectA Dimorphodon Model Wins Award

By | August 4th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Award Winning CollectA Deluxe Dimorphodon

The CollectA Supreme Deluxe Dimorphodon model has been voted by readers of Prehistoric Times magazine the best non-dinosaur prehistoric animal toy of 2017.  This prestigious award recognises the efforts of CollectA to bring larger models to the market, the Dimorphodon measures nearly forty centimetres in length and as such, provides an accurate scale model of one of the first Pterosaurs to be scientifically described.

The Award Winning CollectA Supreme Deluxe Dimorphodon Figure

CollectA Dimorphodon pterosaur model.

The CollectA Dimorphodon model with a movable lower jaw.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The CollectA Dimorphodon and other models in the Deluxe range can be found on Everything Dinosaur’s website here: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Life Models

Early Jurassic Flying Reptile

Dimorphodon was the first Pterosaur fossil from the British Isles to be scientifically described, the first specimen was discovered by the world-famous, amateur fossil hunter Mary Anning.  The fossil, which was missing the skull, was found on the Dorset coast in 1828.  Prior to the scientific description of Dimorphodon, only two species of Pterosaur had been studied, both of which came from the Solnhofen limestone deposits of southern Germany.  When first described, this flying reptile was named Pterodactylus macronyx.  Pterodactylus was the first flying reptile genus to be erected.  It was later discovered that the Dorset specimens had very different shaped heads compared to those fossils associated with the Pterodactylus genus, a new genus name for the fossil was proposed by the English anatomist Richard Owen (1858).

A Scale Drawing of D. macronyx

Dimorphodon scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Dimorphodon macronyx.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Long Claws on the Forelimbs

The species name “macronyx” refers to the large claws on the forelimbs.  It has been suggested that this flying reptile favoured inland habitats and it lived in woodland, the long claws would have helped it to scramble up trees.   The long stiff tail may have been involved in flight stability.  The wingspan of D. macronyx was approximately 1.4 metres, about the same size as the wings of today’s Raven (Corvus corax).

The CollectA Supreme Deluxe Dimorphodon Model

CollectA catalogue 2017.

The CollectA 2017 catalogue featured the Dimorphodon model on the front cover.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We are so pleased for all the team at CollectA.  It is great to hear that their Deluxe Dimorphodon figure has been awarded this accolade.  We look forward to hearing news about what plans the company has for prehistoric animal figures in the future.”

27 07, 2018

JurassicCollectables Reviews the Papo Compsognathus Model

By | July 27th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Product Reviews|0 Comments

The Papo Compsognathus Dinosaur Model Reviewed

The dedicated and enthusiastic production team at JurassicCollectables have made a video review of the new for 2018 Papo Compsognathus dinosaur model.  At Everything Dinosaur, the Compsognathus (along with the Papo Quetzalcoatlus), represent the last of this year’s models to be introduced.  It was certainly worth the wait, especially if you like to collect prehistoric animal figures that are reminiscent of the dinosaurs seen in the “Jurassic Park/Jurassic World” film franchises.  Papo have done a splendid job producing a replica of “elegant jaw”, which at one time, was regarded as the smallest dinosaur known to science.

In the short video review, it lasts a little over ten minutes, the JurassicCollectables narrator reviews this new Theropod model and compares and contrasts this figure with the increasingly rare Rebor Sentry Compsognathus.  Also featured is the classic Papo green standing Tyrannosaurus rex replica, an iconic Papo figure, now sadly out of production.

JurassicCollectables – Papo Compsognathus Dinosaur Model Video Review

Video Credit: JurassicCollectables

JurassicCollectables have produced video reviews of every single prehistoric animal and dinosaur replica that Papo have produced, to see these videos and to subscribe to their fantastic YouTube channel: Subscribe to JurassicCollectables on YouTube

The Papo Compsognathus Dinosaur Model

Papo Compsognathus model.

The Papo Compsognathus figure has an articulated jaw.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Finely Detailed Model with an Elegant Articulated Jaw

The finely detailed model has an articulated lower jaw.  The JurassicCollectables reviewer highlights the jaw and discusses the painting of this feature.  Papo have produced another excellent figure with an articulated jaw, it is quite a skilled job to be able to produce such a small, articulated component.  It is also apt, as Compsognathus means “elegant jaw”, in recognition of this small dinosaur’s elegant, narrow snout and small jaw bones.

To see the range of Papo prehistoric animal models available from Everything Dinosaur (including the Papo Compsognathus): Papo Prehistoric Animals

In the JurassicCollectables Video the Papo Compsognathus is Compared with the Rebor Compsognathus (Sentry)

The Papo and Rebor Compsognathus models.

In the JurassicCollectables video, the Papo Compsognathus model is compared to the Rebor Compsognathus.

Picture Credit: JurassicCollectables

The picture above shows one of the studio shots from the video showing the new for 2018  Papo Compsognathus (background) being compared to the Rebor Compsognathus figure (foreground).   In this well put together video review,  JurassicCollectables comment extensively about these dinosaur models.

The narrator comments:

“Love the use of colour!  The jaw opens really wide which is perfect, it is more of a 1/6th scale figure.  The sculpt is incredible.

Look out also for a cameo appearance by “off-colour Alan”, the Papo Compsognathus replica is one dinosaur model that Alan can look straight in the eye.  Our thanks to the team at JurassicCollectables for posting up this super video review.

26 07, 2018

Beasts of the Mesozoic Figures Back in Stock

By | July 26th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Beasts of the Mesozoic Figures Back in Stock

Great news for dinosaur fans and model collectors.  Another shipment of the excellent Beasts of the Mesozoic 1/6th scale “Raptor” figures has arrived at the Everything Dinosaur warehouse.  This exciting range consists of 24 collectable figures, all members of the Eumaniraptora clade (or if you prefer the Paraves).  Put simply, the models represent dromaeosaurids, troodontids and given the current debate about Balaur bondoc, a flightless bird.

A New Shipment of Beasts of the Mesozoic Figures Has Arrived at Everything Dinosaur

Beasts of the Mesozoic Deluxe 1:6 scale "Raptors".

The Deluxe Raptors in the Beasts of the Mesozoic range available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the Beasts of the Mesozoic range: Beasts of the Mesozoic Models

Build-A-Raptor Kits

Everything Dinosaur has extended their interest in this range by adding the two Build-A-Raptor kits.  Make your very own customised and unique dinosaur with this unpainted set of “Raptor” parts.  The Beasts of the Mesozoic Build-A-Raptor sets have lots of interchangeable parts so you can design and build your own unique prehistoric animal.  So adaptable are the components that the parts in set A (Velociraptor) are interchangeable with the parts in the Build-A-Raptor set B (Atrociraptor).

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Build-A-Raptor Kits Have Been Added to Everything Dinosaur’s Range

Beasts of the Mesozoic Build-A-Raptor Sets

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Build-A-Raptor Sets (Velociraptor and Atrociraptor).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Fact Sheets Sent Out with Every Figure

As part of Everything Dinosaur’s commitment to helping collectors and dinosaur fans learn more about prehistoric animals, we have researched and written a fact sheet on all the creatures featured in this range.  Each fact sheet contains a scale drawing and explains a little more about the dinosaur (or in the case of Balaur bondoc, flightless bird), that this skilfully made replica depicts.  Our fact sheets provide an A to Z guide on the dromaeosaurids and their relatives, or if you will,  Acheroraptor through to Zhenyuanlong suni!

Customers Receive a Fact Sheet with Every Purchase

Fact sheets prepared for the Beasts of the Mesozoic range of models.

A collection of Beasts of the Mesozoic fact sheets created by Everything Dinosaur.  A fact sheet is sent out with every Beasts of the Mesozoic figure purchased.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Which One is Your Favourite?

With so many figures in this wonderful range to choose from, it is hard to decide which replica is our favourite.  For example, there is the magnificent Tsaagan mangas, an articulated, poseable replica of a fearsome dromaeosaurid, that was a contemporary of Velociraptor (V. mongoliensis is also included in the Beasts of the Mesozoic range).

The Two-metre-long Fearsome Tsaagan mangas

Beasts of the Mesozoic Tsaagan mangas.

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Deluxe “Raptor” Tsaagan mangas.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Or perhaps a figure of a European prehistoric animal is more your preference?  Maybe your favourite is the enigmatic and mysterious Balaur bondoc from the Hatag Formation of Romania.

Is it a Bird or is it a Dinosaur?  Beasts of the Mesozoic Balaur bondoc

Beasts of the Mesozoic Balaur bondoc.

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Balaur bondoc replica.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Which Beasts of the Mesozoic 1/6th scale figure is your favourite?

10 07, 2018

Bullyland Ammonite at the Museum

By | July 10th, 2018|Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Bullyland Ammonite on Display

We spotted an old friend whilst on a visit to the Oxford University Museum of Natural History (Oxford, England).  In a display case showing fossils of ammonites we noted that a Bullyland ammonite replica had been placed inside the display case to give visitors an idea of what an ammonite actually looked like.  Ammonite fossil shells may be relatively common, but it is surprising how few people understand that living inside the shell was an animal with tentacles, a creature related to today’s squid, cuttlefish and octopus.

 Spotted in a Museum Display Case – the Bullyland Ammonite Replica

We spotted a Bullyland ammonite model being used to help illustrate a display of ammonite fossils.

A Bullyland ammonite model is used to help illustrate a display of ammonite fossils.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Robust Ammonite Replica

The ammonite model from Bullyland is a robust replica of this iconic mollusc primarily known from the fossil record of the Mesozoic.  It is a super addition to any fossil fan’s collection.  Ideal for creative play, school or home study and for use in museums as the display case at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History testifies.  It is wonderful to see a Bullyland figure used in such a way, helping to educate and inform.

To view the Bullyland ammonite model and the rest of the figures in the Bullyland range available from Everything Dinosaur: Bullyland Models and Figures

The Bullyland Ammonite Figure as it Appears on the Everything Dinosaur Website

Bullyland ammonite model.

The Bullyland ammonite replica.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Helping Out at Many Museums we Suspect

Lots of museums have fossils of ammonites within their invertebrate fossil collections, we suspect that many curators and exhibition managers have taken advantage of this excellent replica and used it to help illustrate what these enigmatic cephalopods looked like.  After all, when our team members visit schools to conduct dinosaur and fossil themed workshops, we use this same Bullyland ammonite to explain to children which bit of an animal is likely to become a fossil and which bits are not likely to fossilise.

At a little under eighteen centimetres in length and with a shell diameter of around nine centimetres, this model was certainly at home amongst the Jurassic ammonite fossils on display.  Seeing the Bullyland ammonite replica being used in a museum got us thinking, are there any other examples of prehistoric animal models and figures being incorporated into a scientific exhibition or display?

It was a pleasure to peruse part of the extensive fossil collection at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History and to discover an old friend.

7 07, 2018

Dunkleosteus – A Very Popular Placoderm

By | July 7th, 2018|Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Dunkleosteus – A Very Popular Placoderm

One of the iconic animals of the Devonian is the large, Placoderm predator Dunkleosteus (D. terrelli).  This huge, prehistoric fish with self-sharpening shears for jaws and an armoured head is just one of more than 200 genera of Placoderms described to date, but as it measured around six metres in length, it competed with early sharks for the role of apex marine predator.  The new for 2018 CollectA 1:20 scale replica of this carnivore is one of just a handful of models that have been produced, as such, it is very rare to have any Devonian vertebrates included in the model portfolio from a mainstream manufacturer.

The CollectA 1:20 Scale Replica of Dunkleosteus

The CollectA Dunkleosteus

The CollectA 1:20 scale Dunkleosteus replica which was introduced in 2018.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the CollectA 1:20 scale Dunkleosteus model and the other figures in the CollectA Deluxe range: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Life

Dermal Armour Up to Five Centimetres Thick

The formidable, armoured head might have made up more than a third of the animal’s entire body length and there is no doubting that this fish had a ferocious bite, but scratches, puncture wounds and gouges preserved on the dermal plates (which in the very biggest specimens were up to five centimetres thick), attest to the fact that these carnivores were attacked themselves.  Whether this pathology, preserved on the fossils represents a record of attempted predation, or whether these wounds were caused by intraspecific combat remains open to debate.

Intriguingly, if other Dunkleosteus fish did not cause these wounds, then what sort of marine predator did?  Is there some unknown Devonian assailant still awaiting discovery in Late Devonian strata somewhere?

A Reconstructed Skull of Dunkleosteus on Display at the Senckenberg Nature Museum

A Dunkleosteus exhibit.

A Dunkleosteus cast on display at the Senckenberg Nature Museum (Frankfurt, Germany).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Placoderms (Class Placodermi), arose in the Early Silurian and they persisted for tens of millions of years, evolving into a myriad of forms. However, as far as the fossil record goes, there is no record of Placoderms surviving into the Carboniferous.  The last of these armoured fish became extinct at the end of the Devonian (Famennian faunal stage of the Late Devonian).

The CollectA Dunkleosteus Replica

CollectA Dunkleosteus.

CollectA 1:20 scale Deluxe Dunkleosteus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

4 07, 2018

Everything Dinosaur Newsletter Early July 2018

By | July 4th, 2018|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Newsletters, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Newsletter (Early July 2018)

The latest prehistoric animal scale models from CollectA along with information about the new Rebor Velociraptor “Sweeney” and the Eofauna Straight-tusked elephant figure are all included in Everything Dinosaur’s latest customer newsletter (early July 2018).  Four new CollectA scale models are in stock, plus the Rebor Velociraptor “Sweeney” reserve list is now open and the Eofauna Straight-tusked elephant model (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) is due to arrive very shortly.

Everything Dinosaur’s Newsletter (Early July 2018) Features the New for 2018 CollectA Scale Models

CollectA Dimetrodon and the CollectA Estemmenosuchus 1:20 scale figures.

Two new Permian prehistoric animal figure models have arrived in stock at Everything Dinosaur – CollectA Dimetrodon and the CollectA Estemmenosuchus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Four New CollectA Scale Prehistoric Animal Models

The latest CollectA scale models have arrived at Everything Dinosaur and feature in the company’s latest newsletter.  Fans of CollectA  have requested that more Palaeozoic figures be added to the range.  Earlier this year, a 1:20 scale Dunkleosteus was added and now joining this Devonian Placoderm are two Permian figures, representing Dimetrodon and the Dinocephalian Estemmenosuchus.  Both these figures are also in 1:20 scale.

To view the new CollectA Deluxe scale models and the rest of the CollectA scale model range: CollectA Deluxe Models

The 1:40 Scale CollectA Deluxe Ceratosaurus and the CollectA 1:20 Scale Gomphotherium Figure

CollectA Gomphotherium 1;20 scale model and the 1:40 scale CollectA Ceratosaurus.

The CollectA Ceratosaurus and the CollectA Gomphotherium models.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In addition to the CollectA Dimetrodon and the CollectA Estemmenosuchus, also just in are the 1:40 scale Ceratosaurus dinosaur model and the prehistoric elephant Gomphotherium.  Like the CollectA Dimetrodon figure, the 1:40 scale Ceratosaurus dinosaur model has an articulated lower jaw.

The Reserve List for the New Rebor Velociraptor “Sweeney” Has Opened

Newsletter subscribers are among the first to learn that another Rebor 1:18 scale Velociraptor replica is on the way.  A reserve list has been opened for Rebor “Sweeney”, subscribers can ensure that they are able to purchase this new Theropod figure when it arrives at Everything Dinosaur’s warehouse later this month.

To reserve a new Rebor Velociraptor figure “Sweeney” or to request a subscription to Everything Dinosaur’s regular company newsletter, simply drop us an email: Email Everything Dinosaur

The New Rebor Velociraptor “Sweeney” and the Eofauna Straight-tusked Elephant

The new Rebor "Sweeney" Velociraptor figure and the Eofauna Straight-tusked elephant.

The new Velociraptor figure from Rebor “Sweeney” and the Eofauna Palaeoloxodon antiquus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Everything Dinosaur newsletter is a great way for subscribers to keep up with new model introductions, information about figure retirements and other news about collecting dinosaurs and prehistoric animal figures.

The New Eofauna Straight-tusked Elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus)

Readers of our latest newsletter were also provided with an update on the progress being made with the eagerly awaited Eofauna Straight-tusked elephant figure (Palaeoloxodon antiquus).   This new prehistoric animal replica, the second in the exciting Eofauna range, is due to arrive at Everything Dinosaur’s warehouse in just a few days.  A reserve list has been opened for this popular 1:35 scale model, collectors don’t need to tie a knot in their trunks to remember, let Everything Dinosaur take care of reserving a model for you.  When the stock arrives, we will set a figure aside for you and even drop you an email to let you know that this model is available to purchase.

Newsletter subscribers can look out for more updates about other new for 2018 figures shortly.  At Everything Dinosaur, we do all we can to keep our readers and subscribers informed.

1 07, 2018

New Deluxe CollectA Figures in Stock

By | July 1st, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

New Deluxe CollectA Figures in Stock

The new for 2018, CollectA Deluxe prehistoric animal models are in stock at Everything Dinosaur.   The CollectA 1:40 scale Ceratosaurus, along with the CollectA 1:20 scale Dimetrodon, Gomphotherium and the amazing Estemmenosuchus.  These hand-painted replicas are welcome additions to, what is already an extensive range of prehistoric animal figures offered by CollectA

CollectA Prehistoric World Scale Models in Stock at Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur stocks the hand-painted, CollectA Prehistoric World scale models.

CollectA Prehistoric World – prehistoric animal models in stock at Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above shows the latest figures to be added to Everything Dinosaur’s CollectA inventory.  In response to the requests from model collectors, the company has decided to make more models of Palaeozoic animals, hence the addition of the bizarre, “crowned crocodile” Estmmenosuchus and the iconic, sail-backed reptile Dimetrodon.  A model of the Late Devonian Placoderm Dunkleosteus was introduced by CollectA earlier in the year.  Another Theropod dinosaur has been added, this time it is a 1:40 scale model of the Late Jurassic predator Ceratosaurus.  The last of the quartet is a superb replica of the early elephant (Gomphotherium), a timely reminder, that the elephant family was once far more diverse than it is today.

The Age of Dinosaurs 1:40 Scale Range

As the CollectA range has expanded, the company has undertaken a degree of rebranding.  A new “Age of Dinosaurs 1:40” scale range has been introduced, although model collectors will note that it also includes pterosaurs and marine reptiles.  New to this range is the 1:40 scale Ceratosaurus, a vividly coloured meat-eating dinosaur with an articulated lower jaw.  A number of species have been assigned to the Ceratosaurus genus, most of which were somewhat lighter and smaller than other hypercarnivores associated with the Morrison Formation of the United States.  To achieve an accurate depiction, CollectA have cleverly depicted their Ceratosaurus figure on a sculpted base.  This permits a more dynamic pose and allows the hind feet to be in appropriate proportion to the rest of the body.

The New for 2018 CollectA 1:40 scale Ceratosaurus Model

CollectA Ceratosaurus dinosaur model.

CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Ceratosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view all four models and to see the rest of the scale CollectA figures: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models

CollectA Other Prehistoric Animals

Three new models have been added to this range.  There is the remarkable Estemmenosuchus, a large, robust animal, distantly related to modern mammals.  Fossil of this Dinocephalian come from Europe (Russia).   Two species have been described, the smaller, E. mirabilis (which we think this CollectA replica represents), was named and described fifty years ago.  It is apt therefore, that on the golden anniversary of the naming of this species, CollectA should introduce a 1:20 scale replica.

Famous for the Bony Horns – Estemmenosuchus from CollectA

Estemmenosuchus model from CollectA.

A Deluxe 1:20 scale Estemmenosuchus model from CollectA.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

1:20 Scale Dimetrodon Model

No Palaeozoic model series is complete without a replica of Dimetrodon.  This pelycosaur is one of the best known of all the Permian synapsids and a number of species have been named.  The new for 2018, CollectA Dimetrodon is in 1:20 scale and it shows some of the very latest thinking concerning this carnivore.   That famous sail does not extend all the way up those tall spines, reflecting the views of a number of palaeontologists.  The Dimetrodon has been given a coat of camouflage, a nod to the likely predatory habits of this reptile, it was probably an ambush hunter, relying on camouflage to permit prey to approach too close, unaware of the presence of the predator.  The CollectA model also has an articulated lower jaw.  Note also the hole in the sail, many fossil specimens show signs of pathology, so CollectA have given their Dimetrodon figure a little bit of “battle damage”.

The CollectA 1:20 Scale Dimetrodon Model

CollectA Dimetrodon model.

CollectA Dimetrodon in 1:20 scale.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe Gomphotherium

Last but not least, is the excellent CollectA Deluxe Gomphotherium figure.  This model too is in 1:20 scale and it is great to see another species of prehistoric elephant being included in the model series. Although the Gomphotheres have an extensive fossil record, with some evidence suggesting the very last of them died out around 8,000 years ago, they are not that closely related to extant elephants.

The CollectA Deluxe Gomphotherium 1:20 Scale Model

CollectA Gomphotherium.

The CollectA 1:20 scale Gomphotherium model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Intriguingly, the length of the trunk is speculative, as the trunk contains no bones, it does not readily fossilise and the length of this iconic piece of a Proboscidean is not known.  CollectA have opted to give their Gomphotherium figure a functional trunk.

Commenting to Everything Dinosaur when these models were first announced, designer Anthony Beeson stated:

“He [the Gomphotherium model] is an addition to our prehistoric elephants.  He is a strange beast with his upper enamel-covered tusks recurving whilst the lower are thought to have been used for digging up roots or water plants.  The length of the trunk is unknown, so I have calculated what I believe would be a useful length.  I have given him a partial furring of hair.”

All four of these exciting replicas are now in stock at Everything Dinosaur.

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