All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Photos
22 03, 2020

We have Frogspawn in our Office Pond

By | March 22nd, 2020|Animal News Stories, Main Page, Photos|0 Comments

Frogspawn Laid on 19th March (2020)

These might be challenging times for us humans (Homo sapiens), what with all the concerns about the coronavirus outbreak, but at least for some animals it is business as usual.  We have frogspawn in our office pond!  The first eggs were laid in the early morning of the 19th March.  We normally have frogspawn around the third week of March in our part of the world, the date of laying can vary by a couple of weeks, depending on the weather and the type of winter we have had.  However, the spawning usually takes place around this time of year (third week of March).

The First Frogspawn Spotted in the Office Pond Early on the 19th March 2020

Frogspawn in the office pond at Everything Dinosaur (March 19th 2020).

The first batch of frogspawn laid in the office pond (March 19th 2020).  The photograph was taken a few minutes after 8am in the morning.  From the size of the frogspawn we think that these are the eggs from a single female and that they had only just been laid.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Common Frog (Rana temporaria)

We have counted a total of seven frogs in the pond, the majority were males.  We tend to have the males arriving first and the females taking up residence a little time later (after all, the females tend to be pounced upon as soon as they enter the pond).  The frogs are all Common frogs (Rana temporaria), their name is a bit of a misnomer these days, as like many amphibians, they are becoming increasingly rare.

More Frogspawn was Laid that Morning (March 19th 2020)

Frogspawn spotted in the office pond - March 19th 2020.

More frogspawn laid on the morning of 19th March 2020.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur estimate that the egg masses represent the eggs from two or three females.  We shall continue to carefully monitor the pond (taking care not to disturb the frogs too much), to see if more eggs will be laid.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

As we cope with the current restrictions on our lives due to the coronavirus crisis, we will be able to observe how the tadpoles are getting on – something for us to think about in these challenging times.  At least the frogs are behaving as normal, for them at least, it is business as usual.

31 01, 2020

A Whale of a Time at the London Natural History Museum

By | January 31st, 2020|Animal News Stories, Main Page, Photos|0 Comments

Saying Hello to “Hope” the Blue Whale Exhibit

Another busy week for Everything Dinosaur team members.  A member of staff was at the London Natural History Museum recently, although they had a busy itinerary there was still time to enter the main gallery (the Hintze Hall) and to say hello to “Hope”, the enormous Blue Whale exhibit that replaced “Dippy” the Diplodocus in 2017.  Suspended overhead, dominating the refurbished gallery, the Blue Whale skeleton (Balaenoptera musculus), symbolises the Museum’s focus on conservation and supporting efforts to save natural habitats and wildlife.

The Spectacular “Hope” Blue Whale Exhibit in the Hintze Hall (London Natural History Museum)

Blue Whale exhibit (London Natural History Museum).

The beautiful Blue Whale skeleton exhibit dominating the Hintze Hall at the London Natural History Museum.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The skeleton measures 25.2 metres in length, it weighs some 4.5 tonnes and consists of 221 individual bones.  Not all parts of the exhibit are real bone, some bones were missing from the right flipper and these have been replaced by 3-D printed mirror copies of the bones from the left flipper.  Seeing the Diplodocus exhibit in the main gallery was always a highlight of any visit to the Museum.  It became almost a ritual to say hello to “Dippy” on the way to a meeting or prior to visiting one of the various departments on site.

The Diplodocus exhibit was only a cast, a specimen that had been donated to the London Natural History Museum in 1905 by the Scottish-born billionaire Andrew Carnegie.  “Dippy” was installed into the Hintze Hall in 1979, but finally removed in January 2017 to be replaced by the Blue Whale exhibit.

We will have to get used to saying hello to “Hope” instead.

 

29 10, 2019

A Pine Cone Dinosaur

By | October 29th, 2019|Main Page, Photos|0 Comments

A Pine Cone Dinosaur

Here in the UK, it is definitely autumn.  British Summer Time (BST), has officially ended, the clocks went back an hour over the weekend and we have had our first frosts.  Still, team workers are snug in their offices working hard to prepare and pack orders for customers.  However, occasionally, just occasionally we get a little time to be creative and make something with a dinosaur or fossil motif.

Take for example this pine cone dinosaur that has been constructed.

A Pine Cone Dinosaur – a Pinoceratops Perhaps?

Pine cone dinosaur.

Making a horned dinosaur (ceratopsian) out of a pine cone.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We used four acorns for the dinosaur’s limbs, the base of the head crest is the bottom of one pine cone, whilst the body is made from another pine cone.  To complete our dinosaur, we made a small head using an off-cut of cardboard and the large brow horns are also made from card too.  To finish our horned dinosaur, we wanted to add a small nose horn, but what to use, how about a pine nut, after all, it is in keeping with the rest of our prehistoric animal.

6 10, 2019

New Species of Crocodile Honours Researcher

By | October 6th, 2019|Animal News Stories, Geology, Main Page, Photos|0 Comments

Crocodylus halli – A New Species of Crocodile is Announced

The crocodile family has undergone yet another revision.  It seems that the Crocodylidae are a more specious family than previously thought.  The New Guinea Crocodile (Crocodylus novaeguineae), is actually two species and not one and the second species has been named Crocodylus halli after Philip Hall, a University of Florida researcher who sadly, passed away before his work on these three-metre-long reptiles could be completed.

A New Crocodile Species has been Discovered – Hall’s Crocodile (Crocodylus halli)

New crocodile species discovered.

A new crocodile species has been discovered.  The picture (above), shows Jen Brueggen, Park social media manager, researchers Caleb McMahan, Christopher Murray and John Brueggen, Park director, with a specimen of Crocodylus halli, that seems rather reluctant to pose for a photograph.

Picture Credit: Southeastern Louisiana University

Crocodile Nesting Behaviour Hinted at Different Species

The late scientist Philip Hall, noticed subtle differences in osteoderm patterns on the backs of crocodiles and in the nesting behaviours of crocodile populations in the north and the south of the island of New Guinea.  He speculated that there could be two species living on New Guinea, but unfortunately, he died before his research could be completed.  Southeastern Louisiana University Assistant Professor of Biology Christopher Murray and his co-author Caleb McMahan (Field Museum, Chicago), were inspired to continue this research and they have published their findings in the academic journal “Copeia”, the journal of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

A chain of high hills and mountains known as the Central Highlands divides the island of New Guinea.  It is thought this geological feature was formed in the last 8 million years or so.  Geographically isolated crocodile populations, each living on different drainage basins that came about as a result of the uplift, have been identified as different species.

The Island of New Guinea 

Distribution of crocodile populations on New Guinea.

The Central Highlands of New Guinea permits two distinct drainage basins to form. This geographical barrier has led to the evolution of two distinct species of crocodile.

Picture Credit: Copeia/Murray and McMahan with additional annotation by Everything Dinosaur

The illustration of the island of New Guinea (above), shows the location of the Central Highlands and the red dots south of the mountain chain denote sampling areas for C. halli in the study, whilst the brown dots north of the chain indicate sampling sites for C. novaeguineae.

Careful analysis of museum specimens along with a study of the crocodiles kept in captivity at the St Augustine Alligator Zoological Park (Florida), confirmed the hypothesis.  Subtle differences in the shape of bones and the observed behaviour differences indicates the presence of two distinct species on the island.  This has been confirmed by molecular analysis.

Difference in the Shape of the Skull and Jaws

Comparing Crocodile Skulls from Papua New Guinea.

Dorsal view of skulls from  New Guinea crocodiles.  Crocodylus novaeguineae (left) with its extended maxilla and proportionately reduced postcranial elements compared with two examples of Crocodylus halli (middle and right).  In contrast, the C. halli skulls show much shorter maxillae and proportionately enlarged postcranial elements.

Picture Credit: Copeia/Murray and McMahan

The Importance of Museum Specimens

The researchers comment that this new insight into the Crocodylidae would not have been possible without access to the collections from numerous museums.  The museums involved in this research included The Field Museum (Chicago), the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, the American Museum of Natural History (New York), Queensland Museum, Louisiana State University Museum of Natural Science and the Florida Museum of Natural History.  The careful curation and collection of a large number of specimens permitted the scientists to build up a substantial database on crocodilian skull morphology that allowed them to tease out the subtle differences between the two species.

Crocodylus halli – Hall’s Crocodile

Newly described crocodile species from New Guinea Crocodylus halli.

One of the residents at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park – Crocodylus halli.

Picture Credit: Copeia/Murray and McMahan

Implications for Crocodile Conservation

Identifying a separate species has important implications for the conservation of both populations of crocodile.

Commenting on the significance of this discovery, Caleb McMahan stated:

“Now that we know the evolutionary history of these species, we need to re-inform the conservation status of them given that the distribution has changed and conservation threats are different in different areas.”

9 07, 2019

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus

By | July 9th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus

Safari Ltd have published a series of images depicting some of the latest introductions in the Wild Safari Prehistoric World model range.  Today, we feature the Parasaurolophus, a dinosaur that has been depicted several times over the history of Safari Ltd models.  The latest incarnation of Parasaurolophus, was introduced in 2017, one of thirteen prehistoric animal models launched by the U.S.-based company that year.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus Dinosaur Model

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus dinosaur model.

A pair of Parasaurolophus cooling off in the Late Cretaceous of North America.

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd/Everything Dinosaur

Parasaurolophus walkeri

Known from numerous very nearly complete and partial skeletons, Parasaurolophus was geographically widely distributed (Alberta to New Mexico – possibly), it is known from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian faunal stage), although there are some unverified reports that this dinosaur may have persisted into the Maastrichtian faunal stage of the Cretaceous.  It is easily recognisable for its long, backward pointing head crest.   Despite the amount of fossil material scientists have to study, the exact size of this herbivorous dinosaur remains open to speculation, with some estimates putting this dinosaur’s maximum length at more than ten metres.  Measurements of the femur (thigh bone), indicate that this duck-billed dinosaur may have weighed more than three tonnes.  Several species have been assigned to the Parasaurolophus genus, perhaps the best known of which is P. walkeri, mainly because this Parasaurolophus species had the more spectacular crest compared to other species in this genus.

Parasaurolophus walkeri – Scale Drawing

Scale drawing Parasaurolophus walkeri.

A crested, duck-billed dinosaur.  A scale drawing of the Late Cretaceous lamebeosaurine dinosaur Parasaurolophus walkeri.  Note the thick-set upper legs and the wide tail.  Recent studies indicate that this facultative biped was very robust.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

10 06, 2019

Jurassic June

By | June 10th, 2019|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Photos|0 Comments

Jurassic June – Favourite Artwork

Lots of things happening at Everything Dinosaur at the moment.  We have something like thirty new models coming into stock over the summer and early autumn, plus of course, we are busy with all our teaching activities and school visits.  However, there is time to post up one of our favourite pieces of prehistoric themed artwork in “Jurassic June”.

Amazing Jurassic June Artwork – Capturing Prehistoric Scenes

Artwork by Zallinger.

Beautiful and Detailed Drawings of Dinosaurs and other Prehistoric Animals.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur (original artwork by Rudolph F. Zallinger)

“Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Reptiles”

The beautiful illustration (above), comes from one of our favourite dinosaur books, “Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Reptiles” written by Jane Werner Watson and illustrated by the amazingly talented Rudolph F. Zallinger.  First published in 1966 (we think this is correct), the office copy dates from the early 1970’s and is in pride of place on our office bookshelves.  Although this book is somewhat outdated in terms of its details and the dinosaurs themselves do not represent current scientific thinking, the illustrations of ancient prehistoric landscapes and the animals that inhabited them are simply stunning.

The illustration depicts a swift Ornitholestes hunting a pair of early birds, a scene depicting the Late Jurassic.  The artwork within this book, by Rudolph F. Zallinger, helped to capture the imaginations of countless children and to enthuse them about dinosaurs and life in the past.  Everything Dinosaur team members were no exception.

9 06, 2019

Ammonites Separating the Boys from the Girls

By | June 9th, 2019|Main Page, Photos, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Male and Female Ammonites

The weather might be most unpleasant for much of the British Isles at the moment, but soon it will be the summer holidays and many of the beaches of Britain will be crowded by fossil hunters keen to add to their fossil collections.  At numerous sites, fossils of ammonites can be found.  The shells of these widespread, diverse and specious cephalopods adorn many amateur fossil collections.  Here at Everything Dinosaur, we have hundreds and hundreds of specimens.  Although, lots of people find ammonite fossils, in our experience few are aware of the amazing sexual dimorphism exhibited by the Subclass Ammonoidea.

Female Ammonites were Larger than Male Ammonites

Sexual dimorphism in ammonites.

Two ammonites from the same species but believed to represent a female (left) and the smaller male (right).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Macroconch and the Microconch

The fossilised shells of ammonites often preserve remarkable detail, but the size of the specimen found can also help to tell the boys from the girls.  It is believed that shell size can help scientists determine male and female specimens in some species of ammonite.  As far as we at Everything Dinosaur are aware, ammonites exhibited sexual dimorphism, that is, the females of a species grew to be much bigger than the males (see picture of ammonite fossil shells above).

The microconch (male) is smaller and wider, whilst the macroconch, believed to represent the female of the species is much larger, an adaptation to accommodate egg production.  This dimorphism is found to today in the close relative of ammonites – the nautilus.

Ammonite Fossil (Male)

Ammonite fossil - believed to be male.

A close view of what is believed to be a male ammonite.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Some male and female ammonites of the same species had different sized and different shaped shells.  There is evidence to suggest that the in some species, the microconch, representing the male had long projections from the forward edge of the body chamber.  This could have helped to protect the animal, but they may have signalled maturity and fitness for breeding.  Perhaps these projections were used in intraspecific conflict over mate selection.

Most ammonite fossils found in the UK represent creatures that lived during the Jurassic, although a number of sites, particularly in southern England, such as the beaches around Folkestone in Kent, yield evidence of Cretaceous ammonites.  Most ammonite fossils found are relatively small with only a few specimens exceeding 25 centimetres in diameter, but fragments of the shells of much larger animals can still be found.

Ammonite Specimens on Display

Male and female ammonites.

A display from the National Museum of Wales (Cardiff) looking at male and female ammonites.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Dangerous Cliffs

The recent heavy rain has led to a number of cliffs becoming unstable.  Everything Dinosaur has posted up helpful information and advice warning prospective fossil hunters to stay clear of cliffs.  Many cliffs have become saturated with water and the risk of substantial rock falls and landslides is high in many coastal locations.  Whether looking for ammonites, or indeed any other fossil for that matter, please take care, heed local warnings and don’t stray too close to cliffs, there are plenty of fossils to be found on the foreshore.

24 05, 2019

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus Model in Stock

By | May 24th, 2019|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus Model in Stock

The new for 2019 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus dinosaur model is in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  This model is the last of the scheduled new model introductions from Safari Ltd for 2019, team members at Everything Dinosaur calculate that Safari Ltd have added eleven new figures to their Wild Safari Prehistoric World range, this new Allosaurus makes a fitting finale to the new products added to this exciting model range this year.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus Dinosaur Model

Allosaurus dinosaur model.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the Allosaurus and the rest of the prehistoric animal models in the Wild Safari Prehistoric World portfolio available from Everything Dinosaur: Safari Ltd – Wild Safari Prehistoric World Figures

Iconic American Dinosaur

Allosaurus (A. fragilis) has been described as an iconic American dinosaur.  This large theropod is known from dozens of fossil specimens, all associated with the famous Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the western United States.  A fearsome predator, Allosaurus has also been called “the lion of the Jurassic”.  Several species have been named and most natural history museums have some Allosaurus spp. fossils amongst their dinosaur fossil collections.  Allosaurus is also one of the most extensively studied of all the large theropods known to science.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur, got to see prototypes of this new for 2019 model some months ago, it is great to see this figure actually in stock.

A Photograph Showing the Beautiful Paintwork and Detailing on the Skin of the New Allosaurus Figure

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus dinosaur figure.

The new for 2019 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Beautiful Paintwork and Fantastic Detailing

As with all Safari Ltd prehistoric animal models, there is much to be admired in this new Allosaurus figure.  The model has been well-crafted and is stable on its two hind legs.  The eye crests are highlighted in blood red and the model has beautiful paintwork and fantastic detailing of the scales on the skin.  Safari Ltd have produced a number of Allosaurus figures over their long history of production.  This is perhaps, the most anatomically accurate of all the Allosaurus figures that they have made.

Don’t Let the Allosaurus Figure Get Away!

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus dinosaur model.

Don’t let the new Allosaurus figure get away.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Team members have been busy contacting all those customers and fans of dinosaurs that asked for one of these figures to be reserved for them.  This task is now complete and staff will be focusing on packing and despatching orders as quickly as they can.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Over the next six weeks or so, a lot of new prehistoric animal figures are coming into stock at Everything Dinosaur.  We are delighted to have kicked-off what will be an incredibly busy summer by being able to bring the Wild Safari Prehistoric World Allosaurus model into our warehouse.  Fans of this range can now update their collection and include all the new prehistoric animal models that have been introduced by Safari Ltd this year.  We look forward to announcing new figures in this range in the autumn.”

2 03, 2019

Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor

By | March 2nd, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli

Our thanks to dinosaur model fan and collector Caroline who sent us some beautiful photographs of her recently purchased Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli figure.  The taxonomic position of Atrociraptor within the Dromaeosauridae remains contentious, however, with a short, powerful jaw and oversized teeth this predator lives up to its scientific name meaning, that of “cruel or savage thief”.

Everything Dinosaur were sent some Photographs of the Atrociraptor Figure Outdoors

Atrociraptor marshalli (Beasts of the Mesozoic) a 1:6 scale dinosaur figure.

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli dinosaur model.  A beautifully composed photograph.

Picture Credit: Caroline

The outdoor location really brings out the colouration of the model, the exquisite way in which the bright red elements of the plumage have been blended in with the muted tones of brown and black.  The sun lit model highlights the texture and the individual feathers on the torso and the top of hips can be clearly seen in this well-composed photograph.

Atrociraptor marshalli

Named and described in 2004, some eighty years after the far better known Velociraptor (V. mongoliensis) was described, this dinosaur is estimated to have reached a length of approximately two metres and weighed around fifteen kilogrammes.  The fossil material associated with this genus comes from the famous Horseshoe Canyon Formation of southern Alberta, however, a single jaw fragment and some isolated teeth from the Two Medicine Formation of Montana may also represent Atrociraptor.

Everything Dinosaur’s Scale Drawing of Atrociraptor marshalli

Atrociraptor marshalli scale drawing.

A scale drawing of the dromaeosaurid Atrociraptor marshalli.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Fast Delivery of a Fast Member of the Dromaeosauridae

When sending her pictures to Everything Dinosaur Caroline commented:

“The order arrived not long ago.  Thank you for the fast delivery.  Please use the photos of the Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli if you wish.”

We are happy to post up Caroline’s excellent photographs, pictures of a fast running dinosaur, that was delivered quite fast as well.

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli Dinosaur Figure

A view of the Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli figure.

A close-up view of the distinctive short snout and the oversized teeth of the beautifully crafted Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli figure.

Picture Credit: Caroline

The photograph (above), shows a close-up view of the head of the Beasts of the Mesozoic model.  The characteristic short, robust snout and the oversized teeth that helped to define this genus can clearly be seen in this beautifully composed picture.

A spokesperson for Everything Dinosaur praised the images saying:

“We are always pleased to receive photographs of purchases from customers.  The Atrociraptor model looks fantastic in these outdoor shots.”

To view the Beasts of the Mesozoic Atrociraptor marshalli and the rest of the Beasts of the Mesozoic articulated “raptor” models available from Everything Dinosaur: Beasts of the Mesozoic Models

2 02, 2019

A Dinosaur Thesaurus

By | February 2nd, 2019|Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Thesaurus and a Dinosaur

Sorry, we finally gave into temptation and posted up a picture that we had been meaning to share on our various social media platforms for some time.  A dinosaur model posed on a Thesaurus which is was on our reference shelves in our offices, but we could not resist anymore…

A Dinosaur and a Thesaurus

Thesaurus and a dinosaur (Tarbosaurus dinosaur model).

A Tarbosaurus dinosaur model and a Thesaurus.  So sorry, but we couldn’t resist posting up this photograph.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Thesaurus is a reference work that allows you to look up different ways of saying something.  By looking up a word in a Thesaurus a list of synonyms will be provided for that term, other words that have the same meaning or mean something very similar.  For example, the dinosaur in the picture is a bipedal carnivore, if you were to look up the term “carnivorous” in a Thesaurus it would suggest alternative words to use such as zoophagous, meat-eating and creophagous.

CollectA Tarbosaurus

The dinosaur model in the photograph is from the CollectA Prehistoric Life range of figures, it is the CollectA Tarbosaurus.  The picture shows a Tarbosaurus and a Thesaurus together.

Load More Posts