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22 11, 2020

Update on the Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls

By | November 22nd, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls Delayed

We are sorry to announce that the arrival of the Rebor Fossil Studies set of 3 skulls has been once again delayed.  We are expecting them imminently but at the moment due to COVID-19, air freight has all but ceased and as virtually all goods are now being shipped there are extensive delays at ports.  With many parts of the world in lockdown, demand for mail order logistics has increased exponentially and this has increased the pressure on an already overloaded system.  We have been trying to get information about delivery to our warehouse, these updates are intermittent and we have not been able to receive the regular updates we wanted.

The Eagerly Anticipated Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls – Ceratosaurus, Carnotaurus and Yutyrannus

The Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls

The first batch of Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls consists of a trio of skull replicas namely Yutyrannus, Ceratosaurus and Carnotaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We have put back the pre-order release date for these items to 12 noon (GMT) on the 1st December (2020).   We apologise for this and let me assure you that the team members at Everything Dinosaur are doing all they can to expediate the arrival of these eagerly anticipated models.

As soon as the items arrive, we will of course, be working extremely hard on your behalf to get these figures packed and despatched as rapidly as possible.

The Rebor Oddities Fossil Studies Carnotaurus sastrei, the Rebor Oddities Fossil Studies Ceratosaurus dentisculcatus and the Rebor Oddities Fossil Studies Yutyrannus huali figures have all been delayed.  This means that those customers who had taken advantage of our special offer and pre-ordered the set of three skull replicas together will have to be patient for a little while longer.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We apologise for the inconvenience.  Team members are doing all they can to help bring in these eagerly anticipated Rebor models into our warehouse, unfortunately with the COVID-19 pandemic and the enormous problems with logistics at the moment, delays are inevitable.  However, we have successfully been able to bring in shipments of other prehistoric animal figures, so we are confident that this matter will be resolved soon.”

To view the Rebor range of prehistoric animal and fantasy figures: Rebor Dinosaurs, Science Fiction and Prehistoric Animal Figures.

21 11, 2020

The Papo Megaloceros Model

By | November 21st, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases, Product Reviews|0 Comments

The Magnificent Papo Megaloceros Model

The magnificent Papo Megaloceros model is now in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  This year (2020), has been exceptionally challenging for many companies due to the COVID-19 global pandemic.  Factory production has been severely affected and logistic operations, so reliable under normal conditions have been under severe strain.  As a result, team members at Everything Dinosaur have found themselves announcing new for 2021 figures, when some of the new for 2020 models had yet to arrive.  Take for example, the Papo Megaloceros, it had been originally scheduled to come out in May, but it has been worth the wait.

The Magnificent Papo Megaloceros Model

The Papo Megaloceros Model

Papo Megaloceros model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Papo Megaloceros

Although this giant deer is often referred to as the “Irish Elk”, this most impressive member of the Cervidae, was not restricted to Ireland.  The “Emerald Isle” marked the western edge of its distribution, during the Pleistocene Epoch and into the Holocene these large herbivores could be found as far east as Siberia.  Megaloceros is not closely related to the elk family either, genetic studies have revealed that the Megaloceros genus is related to the Fallow deer (Dama dama).  The term “Irish Elk” seems to have become popularised from the 18th century onwards.  Numerous specimens found in peat bogs close to Dublin (Ireland), provided museums and private collectors in Europe with a wealth of material to use in displays and the term seems to have originated as a result of these remains being widely seen by the Victorian public.

The Papo Megaloceros Model

Papo Megaloceros model.

The new for 2020 Papo Megaloceros figure is looking very regal.  Many specimens were mounted in museums or in large country houses and this helped popularise the term “Irish Elk”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Model Measurements

The Papo Megaloceros figure is around 13 centimetres tall, with a shoulder height of 6 cm.  Those most impressive antlers have a span of over 11 centimetres.  Based on a 2.7 metre long adult animal, Everything Dinosaur team members estimate that this figure is in approximately 1/18th scale, so the Papo Megaloceros model will work well in dioramas using other prehistoric mammal models that are in 1/20th scale.

The huge antlers were shed and regrown by the bucks each year.  They may look extremely cumbersome, but given the size of the animal these palmate antlers are actually in proportion.

Papo Megaloceros Highlighting the Antlers

Papo Megaloceros model.

The Papo Megaloceros figure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

As with the majority of the prehistoric animal models and figures that they supply, Everything Dinosaur will be providing a free Megaloceros fact sheet with this new Papo replica.

The Beautifully Painted Megaloceros Model from Papo

New for 2020 Papo Megaloceros model.

The beautifully painted Papo Megaloceros model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the new for 2020 Papo Megaloceros and the rest of the Papo prehistoric animal models and figures available from Everything Dinosaur: Papo Prehistoric Animals.

20 11, 2020

PNSO to Introduce a Sauropelta Model

By | November 20th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

PNSO to Introduce a Sauropelta Model

The talented design team at PNSO are to add a replica of the armoured dinosaur called Sauropelta to their model range.  Say hello to Isaac the Sauropelta, yet another fantastic addition to the mid-size model range offered by this exciting figure and replica manufacturer.

PNSO Isaac the Sauropelta Dinosaur Model

PNSO Isaac the Sauropelta.

PNSO are to introduce a replica of the Early Cretaceous nodosaurid Sauropelta. Say hello to Isaac the Sauropelta.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Sauropelta Dinosaur Model

Details regarding this new dinosaur model are at a premium for the moment, but this figure is just the latest in a long line of compelling new prehistoric animal model announcements made by the company.  Everything Dinosaur has announced seven new figures this autumn, the first, Gaoyuan the Microraptor, is due to be in stock in just a few days. PNSO are to add a replica of the bizarre, Chinese marine reptile Atopodentatus to their portfolio and several new dinosaurs have been announced as well – Pachyrhinosaurus, Corythosaurus, Borealopelta, Lambeosaurus, Spinosaurus and Tuojiangosaurus.

Coming into Stock at Everything Dinosaur – Gaoyuan the Microraptor

PNSO Microraptor model.

The packaging for the new for 2020 PNSO Gaoyuan Microraptor dinosaur model.  The model will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in just a few days (as of November 20th 2020).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Isaac the Sauropelta

Sauropelta (S. edwardsorum), is thought to have been an early member of the Nodosauridae family.  The fossils of this heavily-built herbivore come from the Little Sheep Mudstone Member of the famous Cloverly Formation, this strata represents the middle section of this Early Cretaceous formation, the bedding planes associated with Sauropelta edwardsorum fossils are believed to have been deposited approximately 108 million years ago (Albian faunal stage of the Cretaceous).

Sauropelta co-existed with a number of theropod dinosaurs including the allosauroid Acrocanthosaurus as well as the large dromaeosaurid Deinonychus.  The armour, including huge defensive spikes, so exquisitely replicated in the new PNSO model would have helped to defend this slow-moving quadruped from attacks from these predators.

A Close-up View of the Head of the New PNSO Sauropelta Figure

A close-up view of the Sauropelta from PNSO.

A close-up view of the armoured head of Sauropelta, complete with an array of formidable defensive spikes.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It’s great to see a replica of this American nodosaurid added to the extensive PNSO dinosaur model range.  The company has announced a number of new armoured model introductions recently, including a model of Borealopelta and a replica of the Chinese stegosaur Tuojiangosaurus.  They are all so good it is difficult to pick out a favourite.”

The PNSO Sauropelta dinosaur model is likely to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in early 2021.   The model measures 17.3 cm in length.

To view the range of PNSO prehistoric animal models and figures available from Everything Dinosaur: PNSO Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals.

20 11, 2020

New CollectA Models 2021 (Part 3)

By | November 20th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

New CollectA Models 2021 (Part 3)

Everything Dinosaur in collaboration with CollectA announce further additions to the CollectA range of prehistoric animal models for 2021.  Today, we highlight the introduction of an Age of Dinosaurs Elasmosaurus marine reptile model, along with a contemporary of this elasmosaurid, a 1:40 scale replica of the fearsome prehistoric fish Xiphactinus.  Furthermore, a third set of mini dinosaur and prehistoric animal models will be added to the CollectA portfolio.

  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Elasmosaurus – a Late Cretaceous marine reptile.
  • CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus – a Late Cretaceous, predatory fish which was geographically widespread.
  • The CollectA box of mini dinosaurs (set 3) – contains 10 mini prehistoric animal models.

The CollectA Elasmosaurus, the 1:40 scale Xiphactinus and the CollectA mini prehistoric animal set will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around the middle of 2021.

The New for 2021 CollectA Elasmosaurus Marine Reptile Model

CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus model.

CollectA Elasmosaurus marine reptile model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Elasmosaurus

The CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus joins a growing number of marine reptile figures under the CollectA brand.  For example, in 2017 a model of the ichthyosaur Excalibosaurus was added to the range along with a 1:40 scale CollectA Deluxe Kronosaurus.  The famous American palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope named and described Elasmosaurus in 1869, he based his study on fossils that had been discovered in Wyoming.  One of the larger members of the Plesiosauria, this marine reptile reached a length of around 14 metres and it is estimated to have weighed 2,000 kilograms when fully grown.

The CollectA model depicts Elasmosaurus in the act of turning to attack its prey, with its mouth open ready to grab an unsuspecting fish.

On the subject of fish, the next CollectA figure we discuss is a replica of a monstrous predatory fish with a reputation for being particularly aggressive.

The New for 2021 CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Xiphactinus Model

CollectA Deluxe Xiphactinus model.

The CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus prehistoric fish model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe Xiphactinus

A swift and powerful hunter, a number of species have been described from Cretaceous-aged deposits of North America, Europe and Australia.  Xiphactinus (pronounced Zee-fak-tin-us), swallowed its victims whole.  It had a varied diet, mostly fish and occasionally seabirds such as Hesperornis.  Its reputation for being particularly aggressive is well-founded, a Canadian specimen was recently discovered with the remains of a mosasaur flipper trapped in its jaws.   The aggressive nature of this bony fish sometimes was its undoing.  A famous fossil specimen collected by George F. Sternberg and on display at the Sternberg Museum of Natural History (Kansas, USA) shows a 4-metre-long Xiphactinus with a near perfect specimen of a ichthyodectid Gillicus arcuatus located in the stomach cavity.  It is likely that during the swallowing of the 1.8-metre-long Gillicus, the Xiphactinus was fatally injured.

A Famous Fossil of a Fish within a Fish

Xiphactinus with its last meal preserved inside it.

A fossil fish within a fish.  A famous fossil specimen – a four-metre-long Xiphactinus audax that died shortly after swallowing a Gillicus arcuatus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

With a model length of a fraction over 16 cm, the 1/40th scale rating for this figure is around the right ballpark.  Fans of Everything Dinosaur on Facebook will recall that a poll was posted earlier this year asking for views and opinions about the prospects of a Xiphactinus model being produced.  The overwhelmingly positive response received encouraged the design team at CollectA to bring out a Xiphactinus figure.

CollectA Set of Mini Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models (Set 3)

The third new item Everything Dinosaur announces today is a third set of CollectA dinosaur and prehistoric animal models.   These sets have proved to be very popular with dinosaur fans and model collectors, the mini models measure around six to ten centimetres in length and this new set features eight dinosaurs along with a pterosaur and a miniature marine reptile model.

The CollectA Mini Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models Set 3

CollectA mini dinosaurs and prehistoric animals set 3.

The CollectA mini dinosaurs and prehistoric animals set 3.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

This CollectA mini dinosaurs and prehistoric animals set features replicas of:

Dinosaurs – Alamosaurus, Argentinosaurus, Iguanodon, Mapusaurus, Mercuriceratops, Oviraptor, Therizinosaurus and Utahraptor.

Pterosaurs – Guidraco

Marine Reptiles – Pliosaurus (the replica that features in the CollectA mini prehistoric marine animals set)

Model Measurements

  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus – length 24 cm, width across the flippers 8 cm.
  • CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus – length 16.2 cm with a height of around 5.6 cm.
  • CollectA Mini Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Set 3 – average model size ranges between 6 cm and 10 cm approximately.

All three of these items will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around the middle of 2021.

To see the existing range of CollectA Deluxe models: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models.

CollectA models and figures: CollectA Prehistoric Life Models and Figures.

For our blog post on the first of the new for 2021 CollectA models to be announced: New CollectA Models for 2021 (Part 1).

For our blog post on the second batch of new CollectA figures: New CollectA Models (Part 2).

19 11, 2020

Safari Ltd Announce New Models for 2021

By | November 19th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|2 Comments

Safari Ltd Announce New Prehistoric Animal Models for 2021

Safari Ltd have officially announced their new range of prehistoric animal figures for 2021.  The company will be adding models of Daspletosaurus, Baryonyx and a Spinosaurus to their Wild Safari Prehistoric World range and they have extended their Mythical Realms brand by including two armoured dinosaur figures – T. rex and Triceratops.  In 2020, Safari Ltd introduced a total of nine new figures into their Wild Safari Prehistoric World range.  There may be fewer models coming out in 2021, but given the huge difficulties caused by the global pandemic, plus the re-location of the company, Everything Dinosaur would like to pay tribute to all the dedicated and hard-working people at Safari Ltd who have made the introduction of new models possible.

All the models we announce today are scheduled to be in stock in January 2021.

The New Daspletosaurus Dinosaur Model (New for 2021)

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus dinosaur model.

The new for 2021 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus

This striking figure with its green and yellow markings demonstrating the biological concept of counter-shading represents a new tyrannosaurid genus added to the Safari Ltd product portfolio.  It follows on from the tyrannosaurid Qianzhousaurus that was introduced by Safari Ltd this year.

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx Dinosaur Model

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx dinosaur model.

The new for 2021 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The first Baryonyx model produced by Safari Ltd was under the Carnegie range, this figure came out in 1998, but was retired when this brand was withdrawn in 2014.    This new figure will join Suchomimus and Spinosaurus as representatives of the Spinosauridae within the Wild Safari Prehistoric World portfolio.

On the subject of Spinosaurus…

The Colourful New for 2021 Spinosaurus Model

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Spinosaurus dinosaur model.

The 2021 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Spinosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

There will also be a model of a Spinosaurus introduced next year (2021), this figure depicts this iconic dinosaur walking on land, as opposed to the swimming figure that was introduced in 2019.

Not Quite Armoured Dinosaurs

Talk to a palaeontologist about an armoured dinosaur and visions of nodosaurids, polacanthids, stegosaurs and ankylosaurids are conjured up.  However, in 2021 Safari Ltd will be adding a couple of colourful characters to their Mythical Realms range.  Two dinosaurs wearing silver armour will be added.  A T. rex complete with a helmet and an armoured Triceratops dinosaur model.

The Armoured Tyrannosaurus rex Dinosaur Model (Mythical Realms)

Mythical Realms T. rex dinosaur model.

Safari Ltd have extended their Mythical Realms line by adding an armoured T. rex dinosaur model to this range.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Triceratops Sporting a Coat of Armour

Mythical Realms Triceratops model.

The Mythical Realms Triceratops dinosaur model.  Is that a club we can see on your tail?

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“These armoured dinosaurs are very imaginative.  They remind team members of some of the dinosaurs that feature in the Dinotopia series of fantasy novels by author and illustrator James Gurney.  These figures will make an exciting addition to the range of Safari Ltd models that we supply.”

All these figures are expected to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around January 2021.

Model Measurements

We know how important model dimensions are to collectors and fans of dinosaurs who like to try to provide a scale for their figures, so here are those important measurements.

  • Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus – length 22.5 cm approximately with a height of around 11.5 cm.
  • Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx – length 22.9 cm approximately with a height of 8.9 cm.
  • Wild Safari Prehistoric World Spinosaurus – length 22.9 cm with the height of the sail around 7.6 cm.
  • Mythical Realms Armoured T. rex – length 15.2 cm approximately, height approximately 10 cm.
  • Mythical Realms Armoured Triceratops – length 20.3 cm, height of around 8.9 cm.

All these figures are expected to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around January 2021.

To view the current range of Safari Ltd figures available from Everything Dinosaur: Safari Ltd Models and Figures.

17 11, 2020

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences Gets “Duelling Dinosaurs”

By | November 17th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

“Duelling Dinosaurs” Find Permanent Home

The famous “Duelling Dinosaurs” featuring a tyrannosaurid specimen closely associated with a large ceratopsid have found a permanent home at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.  The fossils, discovered eroding slowly out of a hillside formed from the famous Hell Creek Formation deposits of Montana were once thought to represent a dwarf, lightweight species of Late Cretaceous tyrannosaurid – named Nanotyrannus and a new species of horned dinosaur, these days, most palaeontologists consider the largely articulated and heavily associated pair to represent a sub-adult Tyrannosaurus rex and a Triceratops.

Their acquisition on behalf of the Museum, by the not-for-profit Friends of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences will permit palaeontologists access to study these amazing 66-million-year-old dinosaurs as well as allowing the general public to get up close and personal to two dinosaur fossils that could have ended up in the hands of a private collector.

Still Partially Entombed – The  Tyrannosaurid Member of the “Duelling Dinosaurs”

The articulated remains of a tyrannosaur "dueling dinosaurs".

A dorsal view of the articulated remains of the sub-adult tyrannosaurid – part of the “duelling dinosaurs”

Picture Credit: Matt Zeher

Evidence of Predator/Prey Interaction

The fossils, only partially exposed and still protected by their burlap field jackets may represent the best-preserved skeletons of Triceratops and T. rex known to science.  The huge blocks may contain evidence of a predator/prey interaction.  The dinosaur carcasses have not been studied and remain entombed within sediment from the Montana hillside where they were discovered. Because of these rare burial conditions, each bone is in its natural position and Museum scientists will have access to biological data that is typically lost in the excavation and preparation processes.  Entombing sediment preserves extraordinary features such as body outlines, skin impressions and other soft tissues, as well as injuries and potential evidence of interaction, such as tyrannosaur teeth embedded in the bones of its ceratopsian companion.

A Life Reconstruction of “Duelling Dinosaurs”

Triceratops and T. rex battel (dueling dinosaurs).

A life reconstruction of the tyrannosaur pack encountering a herd of ceratopsians.

Picture Credit: Anthony Hutchings

Commenting on the arrival of these remarkable specimens, Jason Barron, chair of the Friends of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences stated:

“It is an immeasurable honour to welcome these specimens as they take up permanent residence here at the Museum.  Duelling Dinosaurs is a singular find; we are incredibly grateful to our supporters for making this a reality and allowing our visitors – in-person and virtual alike – to experience this journey with us.”

In conjunction with the fossil acquisition, design is nearing completion on a globally unique, behind-the-scenes visitor experience at the Museum in downtown Raleigh.  The exhibit will be the first physical expansion of the Museum in over ten years and will build on its sustained leadership in public engagement with scientific research.

Part of the “Duelling Dinosaurs” Awaiting Further Study and Research

Part of the famous "dueling dinosaurs" of Montana.

The articulated and near complete specimens may reveal interaction between predator and prey.

Picture Credit: Matt Zeher

Providing New Opportunities to Learn About Iconic North American Dinosaurs

The acquisition of the “duelling dinosaurs” and the fact that they have a permanent home, will allow palaeontologists the opportunity to carefully study what has been described as one of the most astonishing vertebrate fossils ever found.

Dr Lindsay Zanno, head of palaeontology at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, is very excited at the prospect at being able to study these unique, associated fossils and commented:

“We have not yet studied this specimen; it is a scientific frontier.  The preservation is phenomenal, and we plan to use every technological innovation available to reveal new information on the biology of T. rex and Triceratops.  This fossil will forever change our view of the world’s two favourite dinosaurs.  The way we have designed the entire experience — inviting the public to follow the scientific discoveries in real time and participate in the research — will set a new standard for museums.”

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in the compilation of this article.

To read an article from 2013 about the auction of these fossils: D-Day for Important Dinosaur Fossils.

16 11, 2020

Sealing the Fate of Pinniped Evolution

By | November 16th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos|0 Comments

Ancient Seal from New Zealand Eomonachus belegaerensis

A team of researchers from Monash University (Victoria), the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (Wellington), Canterbury Museum (Christchurch) and Museums Victoria have identified a new species of prehistoric pinniped, an ancient seal, whose discovery is helping to re-write the evolutionary history of these highly successful and diverse marine mammals.

Writing in the academic journal, the Proceedings of the Royal Society B (Biology), the scientists which include Monash University PhD student James Rule, describe a new species of monk seal that swam in the waters around New Zealand some 3 million years ago (Late Pliocene Epoch).  The seal has been named Eomonachus belegaerensis, which means dawn monk seal from Belegaer.  The Belegaer reference relates to the sea of Belegaer or the “Great Sea” that lay to the west of Middle Earth in J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy epic “Lord of the Rings”.

A Life Reconstruction of the Newly Described E. belegaerensis

Eomonachus belegaerensis life reconstrustion.

Eomonachus belegaerensis an ancient seal from New Zealand.

Picture Credit: Jaime Bran (Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa)

Changing Views on Seal Evolution

Fossil specimens including a complete skull found by amateur fossil hunters on the Taranaki beaches (western side of North Island, New Zealand), between 2009 and 2016 led to the erection of this new species.  The research team estimate that E. belegaerensis measured around 2.5 metres in length and weighed approximately 250 kilograms, about the size of an extant crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga), to which Eomonachus was very distantly related.

It had been previously thought that all true seals (phocids), originated in the North Atlantic.  Extant seals are split into two groups, the northern (phocine) and the southern (monachine).  Only two types of monachine seal subsequently crossed the equator to inhabit the Southern Hemisphere.  Those that made this migration consist of elephant seals and the lobodontins, such as the crabeater seal.  The third and most basal monachine, the monk seals, had been regarded as exclusively northern throughout their entire evolutionary history.  The discovery of the three-million-year-old fossil remains of an ancestral monk seal in New Zealand has led the researchers to conclude that today’s monk, elephant and Antarctic seals, actually evolved in the Southern Hemisphere.

This unexpected discovery reveals that all three monachine tribes once coexisted south of the equator and has led to a profound revision of pinniped evolutionary history.  Rather than primarily diversifying in the North Atlantic, monachines largely evolved in the Southern Hemisphere and from this southern cradle later reinvaded the north.

Commenting on the significance of this discovery, James Rule stated:

“This new species of extinct monk seal is the first of its kind from the Southern Hemisphere.  Its discovery really turns seal evolution on its head.  Until now, we thought that all true seals originated in the Northern Hemisphere, and then crossed the equator just once or twice during their entire evolutionary history.  Instead, many of them appear to have evolved in the southern Pacific, and then criss-crossed the equator up to eight times.”

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from Monash University in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “First monk seal from the Southern Hemisphere rewrites the evolutionary history of true seals” by James P. Rule, Justin W. Adams, Felix G. Marx, Alistair R. Evans, Alan J. D. Tennyson, R. Paul Scofield and Erich M. G. Fitzgerald published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

15 11, 2020

New CollectA Models for 2021 Video Review

By | November 15th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

A Video Review of the New for CollectA Models (Part 2)

Everything Dinosaur has produced a short video review of the latest batch of new for 2021 prehistoric animal models to be introduced by CollectA.  On Friday, (13th November), Everything Dinosaur in collaboration with CollectA, announced a CollectA Deluxe 1:15 scale Pteranodon figure along with two Age of Dinosaurs Popular models – Megalosaurus in ambush and Neovenator scenting prey.

Team members have put up a ten minute video reviewing these new models, providing more details and outlining some of the scientific research that inspired their development.

Everything Dinosaur’s YouTube Video – New CollectA Prehistoric Animal Models for 2021 (Part 2)

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe 1:15 Pteranodon Figure

The narrator discusses the new for 2021 CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon figure and highlights details of this revised and updated pterosaur model.  The presence of a tail tassel on the figure is discussed and viewers are shown a diagram of the bizarre tail bones (caudal vertebrae) of Pteranodon that led palaeontologists to conclude that it may have had some form of specialist structure on the end of its relatively long (for a member of the Pteranodontia), tail.  CollectA suggest a tail tassel which could be used in visual displays.  Other proposals include a rudder to help with steering in flight or even a fin to assist swimming when this flying reptile associated with marine environments, ditched in the sea.

The New for 2021 CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon with a Tail Tassel

CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon model in 1:15 scale.

The new for 2021 CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon model in 1:15 scale.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur’s Interpretation of the Pteranodon Model with a Fin

Postulating a fin on the tail of Pteranodon.

Everything Dinosaur has modified the new for 2021 Pteranodon model giving the figure a fin.  In the Everything Dinosaur YouTube video review various theories regarding the bizarre caudal vertebrae of Pteranodon are explored.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Question of the Day

Viewers are asked to consider “what other pterosaur replicas would you like CollectA to make for their Deluxe or Supreme ranges?”  Feedback placed in the comments section would be passed to CollectA.

Two British Theropod Figures

The other figures featured are the two new theropods – Megalosaurus in ambush and Neovenator scenting prey.  It is great to see an updated version of the iconic Megalosaurus introduced.  As the narrator remarks in the video, the Reverend William Buckland would have been proud.  Sharp-eyed viewers will note that the teeth are not exposed in the closed mouth.  This CollectA model has been given lips (same with the new Neovenator replica).  The design team at CollectA have produced a Megalosaurus model based on the latest scientific thinking and that includes adding lips to their model in recognition of the debate with regards to oral tissues within the Theropoda.

The New CollectA Megalosaurus Model has Lips

Lips depicted on the new for 2021 CollectA Megalosaurus dinosaur model.

The new CollectA Megalosaurus has lips.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Neovenator Scenting Prey

The CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Neovenator sports a row of small, raised spines running the length of its body.  It also has a row of brown-coloured skin extensions from its lower jaw down its neck, these give the impression that it had a fleshy wattle as seen in many types of bird today.  The beautifully painted head complete with its yellow flashes is slightly elevated, as if the dinosaur is sniffing.  A scientific paper (Barker et al 2017), proposed that Neovenator had complex neurovascular canals in its snout.  Such structures are associated with a highly developed sense of smell.

CollectA wanted to reflect this research in their 2021 model, hence its full title “Neovenator scenting prey”.

The CollectA Neovenator Scenting Prey Dinosaur Model

Neovenator scenting prey

The elevated head of the CollectA Neovenator scenting prey model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the CollectA Deluxe range of scale models: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animals.

For the CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular range of figures: CollectA Prehistoric Life.

13 11, 2020

New CollectA Models 2021 (Part 2)

By | November 13th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|6 Comments

New CollectA Models 2021 (Part 2)

Today, we introduce the second batch of new for 2021 CollectA prehistoric animals.  Just like last week, Everything Dinosaur announces three new CollectA figures, but today we discuss two dinosaurs associated with England and a replica of a famous flying reptile:

  • CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon in 1:15 scale – a replica of a giant Late Cretaceous pterosaur.
  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular range Megalosaurus in ambush – a new version of the first dinosaur to be scientifically described.
  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular range Neovenator scenting prey – a large theropod, fossils of which are associated with Lower Cretaceous deposits found on the Isle of Wight.

The Megalosaurus and Neovenator models are due to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in early 2021, whilst the CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon is scheduled to arrive later in the year.

The New for 2021 CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon Model (1:15 Scale)

CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon model in 1:15 scale.

The new for 2021 CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon model in 1:15 scale.  This pterosaur figure will have an articulated jaw.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon Model

The new for 2021 CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon is depicted in a grounded quadrupedal pose.  It has an articulated jaw and from the crest shape, we determine that this model represents the Pteranodon longiceps species.  The CollectA model possesses a brightly coloured throat pouch that reflects current scientific thinking about the anatomy of this piscivore and readers will note that this flying reptile has been depicted with a body covering of pycnofibres.

Intriguingly, this Pteranodon model has been given a tassel on the end of its tail.  This genus of flying reptile has been extensively studied and although much Pteranodon fossil material associated with the famous Smoky Hill Chalk deposits of the Niobrara Formation of Kansas has been squashed flat, palaeontologists have noted unique features in its tail bones.  The tail of Pteranodon is much longer than the related Nyctosaurus, it is one of the longest tails of any known member of the Ornithocheiroidea and the bones at the very end of the tail have a unique shape.  The most distal bones (tail bones furthest from the body), consist of two parallel thin rods, the function of which has been speculated upon by several pterosaur researchers.  These bones could have supported a fin to assist with swimming, or perhaps these caudals could have formed the anchor points for some form of tail rudder or perhaps a display device.

A Close-up View of the “Tail Tassel” on the CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon Model

The tail tassel on the CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon model.

A close-up view of the “tail tassel” on the CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Model designer Anthony Beeson has opted for the latter interpretation.

He commented:

“Uniquely the model has been given a tail ‘tassel’, perhaps used in mating rituals, suggested by the existence of the skeleton’s odd duplex centra and tail rods.”

CollectA Megalosaurus in Ambush

The second new figure we announce today is one of two new British theropod dinosaurs in the CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular series – Megalosaurus bucklandii.

The New for 2021 CollectA Megalosaurus Dinosaur Model

CollectA Megalosaurus in ambush dinosaur model.

The new for 2021 CollectA Megalosaurus in ambush dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA will be introducing an updated and revised version of their Megalosaurus model that was introduced in 2010.  The figure has been given a more bird-like posture and a series of raised spines over the hip region.  The skull has been elongated reflecting what is seen in the cranial fossil material of related species within the Megalosauridae.  Eagle-eyed dinosaur model collectors will also note that this new CollectA figure has lips, in-line with a current debate in palaeontology about the presence of oral tissues within the Theropoda and elsewhere.

Commenting on the Megalosaurus model, designer Anthony Beeson stated:

“The Middle Jurassic dinosaur Megalosaurus incorporates the recent suggestion of dinosaurs having lips.  I have based the model with its elongated head on the anatomy of Torvosaurus, a close relative.  The model was designed to show the theropod lying in wait for prey and hence the descriptive title of ‘Megalosaurus in ambush’.  My thought was to see it placed within, or behind a glade of CollectA’s prehistoric plants.”

CollectA Neovenator Scenting Prey

The third and final CollectA model we reveal this week, is that of the Early Cretaceous predator Neovenator, fossils of which are known from the Lower Cretaceous Wessex Formation.  This new figure will replace the Age of Dinosaurs Popular Neovenator model that was part of the second batch of prehistoric animal figures that CollectA produced.

The New for 2021 CollectA Neovenator Dinosaur Model

CollectA Neovenator scenting prey dinosaur model.

The new for 2021 CollectA Neovenator scenting prey dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The figure depicts the strong, grasping hands associated with this genus and the colour scheme is reminiscent of the 1:40 scale CollectA Deluxe Saltriovenator replica that came out earlier this year.  It too, like the new Megalosaurus model sports a row of small, raised spines running the length of its body.  These spines are more prominent at the back of the neck and across the hips.  Once again, this new theropod figure has been given lips by the design team at CollectA.  It will make a fine partner to the CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Mantellisaurus model, that was introduced in 2018, after all, the holotype specimen of Neovenator (N. salerii) was found in association with Mantellisaurus remains.

The head of the model has been beautifully painted with strong, yellow highlights.  Analysis of the skull bones resulted in the publishing of a scientific paper (Tijani Barker et al, 2017), that proposed that this dinosaur had complex, neurovascular canals within its rostrum (snout), such structures are usually associated with aquatic animals and indicate an enhanced sensory function. Since there is no evidence of Neovenator being aquatic, perhaps its enhanced sense of smell helped it to detect prey, hence the descriptive title for this figure “Neovenator scenting prey”.

With the introduction of new Megalosaurus and Neovenator models, the earlier versions of these two theropods will be retired.

Out of Production the Earlier Neovenator and Megalosaurus Figures Made by CollectA

The CollectA Neovenator and Megalosaurus dinosaur models.

Due for retirement the CollectA Neovenator and Megalosaurus dinosaur models.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Model Measurements

  • CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon in 1:15 scale – length 30. 5 cm, height 23.5 cm, width 12 cm.
  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Megalosaurus in ambush – length 16 cm, height 5 cm.
  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Neovenator scenting prey – length 17cm, height 6.2 cm.

The new CollectA Megalosaurus and Neovenator figures are due in stock at Everything Dinosaur early in 2021, with the CollectA Deluxe Pteranodon figure scheduled to arrive mid-2021.

To view the existing range of CollectA Deluxe models: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models.

CollectA models and figures: CollectA Prehistoric Life Models and Figures.

12 11, 2020

Sinking our Teeth into Toothless Pterosaurs

By | November 12th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Shark Spines and Fish Jaws Turn Out to be Pterosaur Mandibles

Over the last few months, Everything Dinosaur has reported upon the research into the Pterosauria conducted by scientists from the University of Portsmouth and the University of Leicester in collaboration with academics from several other institutions.  We really do seem to be having a “Golden Age” of pterosaur research with lots of exciting discoveries about flying reptile behaviour and lifestyles as well as a number of new species being named and described.

Pterosaur Research Has Not Been Standing Still

Hatzegopteryx drawing.

Pterosaur research has not been standing still.  There have been lots of new and exciting discoveries made recently.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Recently, we have reported upon a suite of new Late Cretaceous flying reptiles from Morocco*, research that re-examined some of the evidence associated with integumentary coverings when it comes to flying reptiles**, a new tapejarid from the Wessex Formation (Wightia declivirostris) and last month, team members looked into the tactile qualities of sensitive pterosaur jaws: The Sensitive Beaks of Pterosaurs.

*For our article reporting upon the discovery of several new pterosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Morocco: Pterosaurs, Pterosaurs the “Golden Age” of Pterosaur Research.

*A fourth new pterosaur from Morocco is announced: Afrotapejara zouhrii.

**For the Everything Dinosaur article looking at integumentary coverings in the Pterosauria: Naked Pterosaurs!  No Protofeathers on Pterosaurs.

Researchers from the University of Portsmouth in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Leicester and the London Natural History Museum have published a new paper this week.  Writing in the “Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association”, they report upon the discovery of a new species of toothless pterosaur after the re-examination of vertebrate fossil collections at the Sedgwick Museum (Cambridge) and the Booth Museum (Brighton).

It was Portsmouth University PhD student, Roy Smith, already a published author, as the links we have posted above testify, who found evidence for the new species when searching through material in the collections that had been misidentified either as shark spines or the jaws from prehistoric fish.

Explaining How to Identify the Edentulous (Toothless) Beak of a Pterosaur

Co-author Roy Smith explains about pterosaur beaks.

PhD student Roy Smith explaining what the edentulous beaks of pterosaurs look like.

Picture Credit: Portsmouth University

Late Cretaceous Pterosaurs

The fossil material studied comes from the Cretaceous Cambridge Greensand Member of the West Melbury Marly Chalk Formation.  The fossils had been collected in Cambridgeshire during the latter part of the 19th century, when very little was known about the Pterosauria.  As these sediments represent a marine environment, this does explain to some extent how the toothless beaks of flying reptiles could be confused with shark spines and fish jaws.  Thanks to the efforts of the researchers, a number of of new specimens of edentulous pterosaur jaw fragments have been identified.  These are now recognised as pterosaurian jaw tips and referred to Ornithostoma sedgwicki, which was first named and described by the British palaeontologist Harry Seeley.

It had been thought that O. sedgwicki was a member of the Pteranodontia, perhaps the most famous of all the types of flying reptile known as the genus Pteranodon is part of this group.

A Prehistoric Scene Featuring Pteranodon

The Western Interior Seaway (Late Cretaceous)

Dramatic scene from the Western Interior Seaway painted by Burian.  Images such as this helped to popularise the Pteranodon genus.

Picture Credit: Zdeněk Burian

Time to Re-classify Ornithostoma sedgwicki

The research team which includes Professor David Martill (Portsmouth University), Dr David Unwin (University of Leicester), Dr Lorna Steel (London Natural History Museum) as well as PhD student Roy Smith, conclude that as tiny pits along the side of the jaw bone have been identified in these fragmentary fossils, it might be time to revise the taxonomy of O. sedgwicki.

If these pits and minute holes indicate the presence of neural foramina (nerves passing through the jaw to make contact with the beak’s surface to help the animal sense its environment), then as neural foramina are not known in the Pteranodontia, Ornithostoma could have been placed in the wrong part of the flying reptile family tree.

The scientists assign O. sedgwicki to the Azhdarchoidea group instead.  Whatever the classification of Ornithostoma, its fossils still probably represent the first evidence of toothless pterosaurs to have ever been discovered.

Student Roy Smith, summarising what the team found as they re-examined the material from the 19th century stated:

“Two of the specimens discovered can be identified as a pterosaur called Ornithostoma, but one additional specimen is clearly distinct and represents a new species – it is a palaeontological mystery.”

Unfortunately, like most of the pterosaur fossils associated with the Cambridge Greensand of England, this fossil is too fragmentary to permit a new genus to be erected.

The scientific paper: “Edentulous pterosaurs from the Cambridge Greensand (Cretaceous) of eastern England with a review of Ornithostoma Seeley, 1871” by Roy E. Smith, David M. Martill, David M. Unwin and Lorna Steel published in the Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association.

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