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Book reviews and information on dinosaur books by Everything Dinosaur team members.

6 07, 2020

“Dinosaurs How they lived and evolved” Book Review

By | July 6th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Book Reviews, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

A Review of “Dinosaurs How they lived and evolved”

Time to sink our teeth into “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved”, the second edition of this comprehensive account of the Dinosauria written by Darren Naish and Paul  M. Barrett.  This book was first published four years ago but this is a much revised edition with a soft cover.  Conveniently split into six broad chapters, it is aimed at the general reader as well as the dedicated dinosaur enthusiast and student of the Earth Sciences.  The authors possess a rare gift, sadly often lacking in other science communicators, that is, the ability to convey complex ideas and information in an entertaining and coherent manner.

The text is supported by a small glossary, a section directing the reader to further sources of information and a comprehensive index.  In addition, the carefully selected illustrations, diagrams, stunning photographs and artwork help to acquaint the reader with new ideas and developments in vertebrate palaeontology.

The Front Cover of “Dinosaurs How They Lived and Evolved”

The front cover of the dinosaur book.

The front cover of the revised and updated second edition of “Dinosaurs How they lived and evolved” by Darren Naish and Paul. M. Barrett.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

What’s New in this Edition?

Originally published in 2016, this second edition is described by the publishers as a “fully revised and updated version”, suffice to say this expression probably undersells this new edition somewhat.  Such is the nature of palaeontology that our knowledge of the Dinosauria is constantly changing, new ideas are being put forward and long established mindsets challenged.  This publication updates the general reader and incorporates some substantial changes.  There’s much more to this book than just a new cover!  Although we have to congratulate the authors for selecting renowned palaeoartist Bob Nicholls and his interpretation of the Chinese heterodontosaurid Tianyulong, it is an inspired choice (see above).  This stunning artwork dramatically sums up how what we know about dinosaurs has changed and the way in which these “fearfully great lizards” are depicted.

In the second edition a number of images have been changed and several of the simplified cladograms have been revised to incorporate new research.

For example, in Chapter 2 “The Dinosaur Family Tree” this chapter has been rewritten and includes the controversial reassessment of the Dinosauria by Baron et al that was published in 2017.

To read more about the scientific paper: Root and Branch Reform of the Dinosaur Family Tree.

Many new taxa are included with illustrations and the sections covering the origin of birds and their relationships within the Maniraptora have been revised and updated.

Simple, Easy to Understand Diagrams

Ornithopoda cladogram.

Simplified cladograms provide information and many have been updated to reflect new research.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Beautiful Photographs of Famous Museum Exhibits

Throughout this beautifully illustrated publication there are lots of full colour photographs of famous dinosaur fossils and museum exhibits to enjoy.  Credit to the authors for concluding this excellent book with a final chapter that not only details the mass extinction event that marks the end of the Mesozoic but looks at how the Aves faired during this period of dramatic turmoil and their continuance of the theropod line into modern times.

The Book Features Detailed Images of Iconic Dinosaur Fossils and Museum Exhibits

Coelophysis dinosaur fossil.

The book contains beautiful photographs of some of the most iconic dinosaur fossils.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

This dinosaur book is highly recommended.

29 06, 2020

A Preview of the Next Edition of “Prehistoric Times”

By | June 29th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page|0 Comments

The Front Cover of Issue 134 “Prehistoric Times”

Team members at Everything Dinosaur are eagerly awaiting the arrival of the next edition of the quarterly magazine “Prehistoric Times”.  We have not got too long to wait and just to whet the appetites of subscribers we have published a picture of the front cover of the next issue (issue number 134).  The front cover features an illustration of Allosaurus by the distinguished and extremely influential Zdeněk Burian.  In the summer issue of the magazine, John Lavas continues his long-running series of articles discussing the work of the famous Czech artist.  In this edition, the focus in on Burian’s theropod dinosaur artwork.

The Front Cover of Prehistoric Times (Issue 134 – Summer 2020)

"Prehistoric Times" magazine, the front cover of issue 134.

The front cover of “Prehistoric Times” magazine (summer 2020).

Picture Credit: Mike Fredericks

The editor of the magazine, Mike Fredericks commented:

“John Lavas has finally reached the dinosaurs painted by Burian so we celebrate with a rare painting of his of Allosaurus on the front cover.  We include Diplodocus and Mark Hallett also writes an article about this dinosaur with much of his art.”

As always, the next issue of “Prehistoric Times” will be crammed full of informative articles, news, model reviews and updates on dinosaur fossil discoveries.  The fearsome ancient crocodyliform Kaprosuchus (K. saharicus) from the Upper Cretaceous Echkar Formation of Niger also features in the forthcoming issue.

To subscribe to “Prehistoric Times” magazine: Learn more about “Prehistoric Times” magazine.

21 06, 2020

A Trip Down Memory Lane to the Late Jurassic

By | June 21st, 2020|Book Reviews, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Photos|0 Comments

The Solnhofen Lagerstätte

Whilst looking for some information related to Triassic archosaurs, we came across a copy of a dinosaur book that was published forty-four years ago (1976).  Entitled “The evolution and ecology of the Dinosaurs”, this publication and the way it depicts the Dinosauria and their relatives might be very much out of date these days, but perusing the pages with their beautiful illustrations is still a very worthwhile activity.

The Front Cover of “The evolution and ecology of the Dinosaurs”

"The evolution and ecology of the Dinosaurs" by L. B. Halstead.

The front cover of “The evolution and ecology of the dinosaurs” by L. B. Halstead.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Written by L. B. Halstead and illustrated by Giovanni Caselli, this dinosaur book was part of the Eurobook Ltd stable and was published by Book Club Associates.  We suspect that further editions were published but this is the only copy that we have in Everything Dinosaur’s library.

Five Chapters

Following a brief introduction, the book takes the reader through the evolution of the dinosaurs with one chapter dedicated to the origin of the Reptilia and the conquest of terrestrial environments.  A second chapter defines dinosaurs and sets out the “classical” view of the dinosaur family tree complete with a skilfully designed chronology of the main types of dinosaur and how they fit into the Reptilia and in broader terms, the evolution of the subphylum Vertebrata (the vertebrates).  The other three chapters are dedicated to the Triassic, Jurassic and the Cretaceous respectively.

One of the Beautiful Illustrations from the Dinosaur Book

A Late Jurassic lagoon.

An illustration from a dinosaur book, depicting the extensive lagoons of what was to become Germany in the Late Jurassic.

Picture Credit: Giovanni Caselli

In the foreground (above), a second species of Compsognathus – C. corallestris is shown.  It was thought that this theropod was adapted to a semi-aquatic existence.  The first fossils associated with Compsognathus were found in southern Germany in the 19th century.  A second, larger specimen associated with this genus was found in a lithographic limestone quarry near Nice in 1971.  This specimen was scientifically described and named in 1972 by Alain Bidar et al.  Although, the French specimen was found in association with lagoonal deposits and at the time it was described it was thought to be a separate species, C. corallestris is now thought to be a junior synonym of Compsognathus longiceps and most palaeontologists think that there is just one species associated with this genus.

The Complete Illustration of a Jurassic Lagoon from the Dinosaur Book

A Late Jurassic scene from Germany.

The full illustration depicting the lagoonal environment associated with the Solnhofen Lagerstätte.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

It was a pleasant experience to take a few minutes out of our busy day to take a trip down memory lane with this book about dinosaurs.

14 06, 2020

A Video Review of “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved”

By | June 14th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Book Reviews, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

“Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” Video Review

Everything Dinosaur Facebook fans and followers will know that recently we ran a special competition to win one of three signed copies of the new dinosaur book by Darren Naish and Professor Paul Barrett.  The contest may have drawn to a close but for those of you not lucky enough to win one of the “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved”, we have produced a short video, providing a brief overview of this excellent publication.

A Whizz Through “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved”

Video credit: Everything Dinosaur

Completely Revised and Updated

In our short video review, we highlight “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved”, a book originally published in 2016, but this edition has been updated and revised.  Conveniently split into six comprehensive chapters, starting with an introduction to the Dinosauria and concluding with the End-Cretaceous mass extinction event that saw the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs.  The final chapter also looks at those theropods that survived the extinction event – the birds.  This well-written book briefly highlights the diversity of the birds but also leaves the reader in no doubt that the Aves suffered extinctions at the end of the Mesozoic.

Beautifully Illustrated Dinosaur Book

Wonderful illustrations in the dinosaur book.

As well insightful writing, the book features the work of famous artists such as John Sibbick, Davide Bonadonna, Bob Nicholls and Mark Witton.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur (from Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved)

Fantastic Dinosaur Illustrations and Artwork

Aimed at the general reader with an interest in the Earth sciences and especially palaeontology, this new publication is eminently suitable for teenagers and above.  It is crammed full of fascinating information and provides a comprehensive overview of dinosaurs, with many detailed illustrations and cladograms provided by Darren Naish (University of Southampton).  Look out for amazing artwork produced by such luminaries as Bob Nicholls, Davide Bonadonna, Mark Witton, John Sibbick and Dr Julius Csotonyi (pronounced Chit-en-Knee).  It was Bob Nicholls who created the fascinating illustration of a ginkgo-chewing heterodontosaurid (Tianyulong confuciusi) that features on the front cover.

Tianyulong confuciusi Features on the Front Cover

The front cover of the dinosaur book.

Artwork by the very talented Bob Nicholls features on the front cover of “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

An illustration of Sinosauropteryx prima

An illustration of Sinosauropteryx prima.

An illustration of Sinosauropteryx with its countershading and “bandit mask” produced by Bob Nicholls, just one of large number of superb illustrations and examples of palaeoart included in the book.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur Facebook Competition

Everything Dinosaur Facebook fans and followers will probably remember that we recently ran a special competition to win one of three signed copies of this brilliant dinosaur book.  Co-author Darren Naish had produced a personalised drawing on the inside front cover of each of the prizes that Everything Dinosaur gave away in their free to enter contest.

A Personalised and Signed Dinosaur Illustration on the Inside Front Cover

A sketch of Caudipteryx.

A sketch of the primitive oviraptorosaur Caudipteryx by Darren Naish.  Lucky Everything Dinosaur competition winners received a personalised and signed copy of this dinosaur book.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Everything Dinosaur YouTube channel, is packed with lots of amazing videos all about dinosaurs and prehistoric animals: Subscribe to Everything Dinosaur on YouTube.

31 05, 2020

Win, Win, Win with Everything Dinosaur!

By | May 31st, 2020|Adobe CS5, Book Reviews, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils, Press Releases|0 Comments

Competition Time at Everything Dinosaur!

Everything Dinosaur is offering to give away three very special signed copies of “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” by Darren Naish and Paul M. Barrett, a fantastic book published by the Natural History Museum of London in our free to enter competition.

PLEASE NOTE THIS COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED

Win a Fantastic Dinosaur Book with Everything Dinosaur

The front cover of the dinosaur book.

Suggest a name for Tianyulong on the front cover to enter Everything Dinosaur’s competition.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We have three of these marvellous books to give away and each one contains a unique, signed drawing by Darren Naish.

Each Book Contains a Unique, Signed Drawing by Darren Naish

A signed drawing of Latenivenatrix by Darren Naish.

Each book in the Everything Dinosaur competition contains a unique signed drawing.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

All you have to do is “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s FACEBOOK page, then comment on the “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” picture, providing a suggested name for the Tianyulong dinosaur featured on the front cover.

Everything Dinosaur on FACEBOOK: “LIKE” our Facebook page and enter the competition!

We will draw the lucky winners at random and the “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” competition closes on midnight Sunday 14th June.  Good luck, we hope you win one of these unique dinosaur books.

Terms and Conditions of the “Everything Dinosaur Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” Book Competition

Automated entries are not permitted and will be excluded from the draw.

Only one entry per person.

The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative will be offered.

The “Everything Dinosaur Dinosaurs –  how they lived and evolved” competition runs until midnight Sunday 14th June 2020.

Winner will be notified by private message on Facebook.

Prize includes postage and packing.

This giveaway is in no way sponsored, endorsed, administered by or associated with Facebook.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges a complete release of Facebook by each entrant/participant.

For full terms and conditions contact: Contact Everything Dinosaur.

Beautiful Photographs of Fossils and Detailed Text

Amazing photographs and informative text.

Lots of amazing photographs of dinosaur fossils and detailed, informative text in this new dinosaur book entitled “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” by Darren Naish and Paul M. Barrett.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To enter Everything Dinosaur’s book competition, all you have to do is “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s FACEBOOK page, then comment on the “Dinosaurs – how they lived and evolved” picture, providing a suggested name for the Tianyulong dinosaur featured on the front cover.

The illustration of the bizarre Jurassic heterodontosaurid Tianyulong confuciusi that features on the front cover was created by the very talented palaeoartist Bob Nicholls.

PLEASE NOTE THIS COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED

22 04, 2020

Prehistoric Times Issue 133 Reviewed

By | April 22nd, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Spring Edition of Prehistoric Times Magazine Reviewed

The latest edition of the quarterly magazine for fans of dinosaurs and prehistoric animal figures has arrived at Everything Dinosaur.  The arrival of “Prehistoric Times” is very welcome, we note that with much of the world in lockdown (coronavirus), the demand for reading material has increased exponentially.  Collectors of prehistoric animal models and figures looking for an interesting and enjoyable diversion are advised to check out this excellent magazine, here is our review of issue 133.

The Front Cover of “Prehistoric Times” Magazine – Spring 2020

Prehistoric Times magazine cover (spring 2020).

The front cover of Prehistoric Times magazine (spring 2020) issue 133.  Prehistoric animals featured in this edition include Triceratops and Tylosaurus – hence the front cover artwork by American artist Chuck Egnaczak.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Mike Fredericks

Triceratops and Tylosaurus

The latest instalment in the “Jurassic World” franchise may have stopped production as reported on this blog last month, but the presses at “Prehistoric Times” keep rolling and this edition is just crammed full lots of amazing stories, model reviews, interviews and features.  We see that our chum Andy and “Andy’s Dinosaur Reviews” gets a mention – well done Andy, keep up the good work on your YouTube channel.  Andy recently reviewed the Rebor Fallen Queen Triceratops and this leads us on to the Triceratops feature by Phil Hore.  It is a most interesting and informative read, a chronicle of the history of research into “three-horned face”.  Some splendid reader supplied art is included, special shout outs to Jason R Abdale, John Patterson and Aaron Marsh for their contributions.  Phil Hore also produced the piece on Tylosaurus – referred to as the “ram-headed mosasaur”.   This is another well-crafted article, with lots of imaginative reader submitted illustrations.  Honourable mentions to Mike Landry for his polar themed Tylosaurus illustration and to John Davies who depicts a Tylosaurus grappling with a giant squid.

Lots of Amazing Reader Submitted Artwork to Illustrate the Tylosaurus Article

Tylosaurus artwork and ilustrations.

Lots of fantastic reader submitted Tylosaurus artwork.

Picture Credit: Prehistoric Times Magazine/John Davies/Russell J Hawley

Corythosaurus and Dinosaur Stamp Sets

The talented Tracy Lee Ford guides us through the differences between lambeosaurines and the Saurolophinae when it comes to illustrating the beaks of duck-billed dinosaurs.  His article culminates in a drawing of the head of “helmet lizard”.  Jon Noad presents the third part of his series on dinosaur themed stamps from around the world and John Lavas continues his long-running feature on the palaeo-artist Zdeněk Burian, this time the focus is on early birds, expect hesperornithiforms a plenty.  A special mention to all those who contributed artwork illustrating the recently described new species of Allosaurus (A. jimmadseni), here’s our blog story about this newest member of the Allosaurus genus: A New Species of Allosaurus.

In amongst the reader art, Randy Knol highlights what’s new in the world of prehistoric animal model figures and discusses his trips to the recent Nuremberg and New York Toy Fairs.  Whilst in Germany, Randy had time to catch up with Everything Dinosaur team members as well as to meet Stefan Klein who is creating the exciting range of replicas in the “Wild Past” line.  Stefan’s first model – Protoceratops andrewsi is discussed and later reviewed by editor Mike Fredericks as he updates readers on new model introductions from CollectA, Eofauna et al.

The Wild Past 1:35 Scale Protoceratops andrewsi Model

Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model.

The new for 2020 Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  This photograph was used in issue 133 of “Prehistoric Times” to illustrate this exciting new line of figures (Wild Past).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Look out for the interview with Robert Bakker conducted by Tony Campagna, an article on fake fossils by Allen Debus and the paleo-news section from editor Mike Fredericks along with the “Mesozoic Media” piece which provides details of another publication – “Fantastic Fossils” by prolific author Donald R. Prothero.  The spring issue of “Prehistoric Times” is jam-packed with fascinating features and amazing articles, there is even a piece on the Starlux model collection of yesteryear and a heady mixture of cowboys and theropods with a reconstruction of the iconic predator from the 1969 movie “The Valley of the Gwangi”.

For Andy’s Dinosaur Reviews on YouTube: Visit Andy’s Dinosaur Reviews.

To subscribe to the  quarterly magazine “Prehistoric Times”: Subscribe to Prehistoric Times Magazine.

11 04, 2020

Prehistoric Times (Spring 2020)

By | April 11th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page|0 Comments

Prehistoric Times (Issue 133 – Spring 2020)

The next edition of the quarterly magazine “Prehistoric Times” is on its way to Everything Dinosaur.  This magazine will be arriving at our offices in the very near future.  The Editor, our chum and long-time collaborator Mike Fredericks, sent us an image of the front cover of the forthcoming issue (spring 2020 – issue number 133).

The Front Cover of “Prehistoric Times” Issue Number 133

Prehistoric Times magazine cover (spring 2020).

The front cover of Prehistoric Times magazine (spring 2020) issue 133.

Picture Credit: Mike Fredericks

Tylosaurus and Triceratops

The featured prehistoric animals are Triceratops and Tylosaurus, readers can expect an in-depth and up-to-date review on the science behind these inhabitants of the Late Cretaceous by Phil Hore.  Phil’s articles will be illustrated by lots of reader supplied artwork of “first horned face” and “protuberance lizard”.  The illustrations and drawings sent into the magazine are always a highlight.  On the subject of highlights, look out for an interview with renowned palaeontologist Robert Bakker by Tony Campagna.  We wonder what the interview will cover, perhaps a reassertion that the majority of the dinosaurs were endothermic (warm-blooded), or that the evolution of the angiosperms (flowering plants), was strongly influenced by herbivorous dinosaur feeding strategies?  Maybe, the debate about whether Tyrannosaurus rex was primarily a hunter or a scavenger will rear its head?

Tylosaurus Will Feature in the Next Issue of Prehistoric Times Along with More Artwork from Zdeněk Burian

The Western Interior Seaway (Late Cretaceous)

A dramatic scene from the Western Interior Seaway painted by Burian.  A Tylosaurus is shown in the foreground fighting with an elasmosaurid, whilst a flock of Pteranodon (P. longiceps) pterosaurs soar over their heads.  The next issue of “Prehistoric Times” will feature more artwork from Zdeněk Burian.

Picture Credit: Zdeněk Burian

On the subject of Tylosaurus artwork, the front cover art featuring this marine reptile along with some teleosts was produced by the American artist Chuck Egnaczak.  The front cover illustration is most impressive, we really admire the little details such as the scars clearly visible on the tip of the jaw of the marine reptile and the way in which the fish have been painted to provide the illusion of rapid, fleeting movement.

Perhaps the palaeonews section will cover some of the news stories and articles that we have recently featured on this blog.

“Prehistoric Times” Subscribers Can Expect to Come Face to Face with Triceratops in the Next Issue

The anterior portion of Triceratops

Coming face to face with Triceratops.  This iconic Late Cretaceous dinosaur features in the next issue of “Prehistoric Times” magazine – issue 133.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Team members are looking forward to receiving their copy.  In these challenging and difficult times, it is great to have something to look forward to.

For further information on “Prehistoric Times” magazine and for details how to subscribe: “Prehistoric Times” Magazine.

27 03, 2020

Recommended Reading – Dinosaurs

By | March 27th, 2020|Book Reviews, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Recommended Reading – “The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries”

With an estimated one quarter of the world’s population currently in lockdown and not able to get out and about, team members at Everything Dinosaur have been providing lots of support and assistance.  As we are unable to visit schools or to work in museums, we have ensured that our huge range of dinosaur and fossil teaching materials remain accessible to all those teachers, parents and guardians attempting to home educate.

However, we have also been asked to recommend suitable prehistoric animal themed reading materials.  So, in this spirit, the first publication we shall highlight is the excellent “The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries”, written by the highly talented American palaeontologist and geologist Donald R. Prothero, adjunct professor of geological sciences at California State Polytechnic University (Pomona, California).

The Front Cover of “The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries”

"The Story of the Dinosaursin 25 Discoveries".

Front cover of the new book by Professor Donald R. Prothero “The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our Book Review

Team members were lucky enough to be sent an advance copy of this new book.  Having read it, we produced a review and put this on our blog site in December (2019).

Our review can be found here: Everything Dinosaur reviews “The Story of the Dinosaurs in 25 Discoveries”.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“This book tells the fascinating story of how our understanding of the Dinosauria has changed and evolved from the early days of the science of palaeontology through to some of the latest research involving dinosaur colouration and inferred social behaviours.  Dinosaur fans will be delighted with this latest offering from Columbia University Press and Everything Dinosaur highly recommends this new publication.”

This book can be acquired from the Columbia University Press website: Columbia University Press.   The search function on the Columbia University Press website can be used to find other books authored by Donald R. Prothero.

Whilst much of the world is in lockdown, it might be prudent and indeed opportune to catch up with some reading.

Stay safe, keep well.

4 03, 2020

Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast – Book Review

By | March 4th, 2020|Book Reviews, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

A Review of “Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast”

The revered UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the “Jurassic Coast” has far more to offer fossil enthusiasts than just the congested beaches associated with Lyme Regis and Charmouth.  Head east towards Weymouth, travelling forward in deep geological time through the Jurassic and into the Cretaceous and the visitor to such places as Redcliffe Point, Bowleaze Cove and West Weare Cliff can be rewarded with some fantastic fossil discoveries.  In addition, intrepid explorers can enjoy some of the most spectacular and picturesque parts of the coast of southern England.

Providing a guide to this beautiful part of the world, is a new book written by dedicated fossil collectors Steve Snowball and Craig Chivers.  Entitled “A Guide to Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast”, this is one book that does exactly what it claims to do in the title and what an excellent read it is too!

Fossil Hunting Guide with a Focus on the South Dorset Coast

"Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast"

Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast by Steve Snowball and Craig Chivers.  The front cover features a theropod dinosaur, a pliosaur Pliosaurus kevani and an example of an ammonite fossil.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Exploring a Range of Prehistoric Landscapes

Aimed at amateur fossil collectors as well as general visitors to the Dorset coast, this, the second volume in the series, takes the reader eastwards along the Dorset coast heading in the direction of Weymouth, the Isle of Portland and beyond.  The western part of the Dorset coast, covered in the first book, dealt with the fossils that can be found in the marine deposits associated with Lyme Regis, Seatown and the coastline eastwards towards Burton Bradstock.  In this guide, the reader is given the opportunity to explore different ancient environments as the rocks along the shoreline provide clues to ancient lagoons, dinosaur dominated floodplains as well as ancient seas populated by ammonites, corals, dense beds of oysters and exotic sea urchins.

An Example of a Sea Urchin (Holaster spp.) from the Cretaceous Upper Greensand Exposures of Ringstead Bay

Sea urchin fossil from Ringstead Bay

A beautifully preserved sea urchin (Holaster spp.) from the Cretaceous Upper Greensand of Ringstead Bay.

Picture Credit: Snowball and Chivers

Following a general introduction section, outlining the importance of the “Jurassic Coast”, the reader is provided with information regarding the fossil collecting code and then schooled in the geology of the region.  The brief guide to the geology and landscapes of south Dorset then leads onto a series of chapters that provide details on excursions that can be undertaken to prospect for fossils.  Each location is beautifully illustrated with stunning photographs of the fossils that can be found and the ancient prehistoric landscapes are brought to life by Andreas Kurpisz, from a shallow sea with an oyster reef to a herd of brachiosaurs wandering across what would eventually become part of the Purbeck Formation.

A View of Bowleaze Cove from Redcliff Point

A View of the strata associated with Bowleaze Cove.

The rugged and beautiful Bowleaze Cove (south Dorset).  The book provides details of numerous excursions to some of the more secluded areas of the “Jurassic Coast”.

Picture Credit: Snowball and Chivers

Detailed Information About Fossil Collecting on the Isle of Portland is Provided

West Weare Cliff (Dorset).

West Weare Cliff at the end of Chesil Beach in Dorset.  The Kimmeridge Clay exposures can provide a wealth of fossils including ichthyosaur and plesiosaur remains.

Picture Credit: Snowball and Chivers

“A Guide to Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast” provides a comprehensive overview on fossil collecting opportunities along the coast of  southern Dorset, it is essential reading for fossil collectors and for those wishing to explore eastwards along the “Jurassic Coast” from Burton Bradstock.

Published by Siri Scientific Press, “A Guide to Fossil Collecting on the South Dorset Coast” can be found here: Purchase the Book Here.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s review of the first book in this series: A Review of “A Guide to Fossil Collecting on the West Dorset Coast”.

3 02, 2020

Prehistoric Times Issue 132 Reviewed

By | February 3rd, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Prehistoric Times Issue 132 (Winter 2020) Reviewed

The winter 2020 issue of “Prehistoric Times” magazine has arrived at the Everything Dinosaur offices.  Lots for team members to do, but some handy business trips afforded us the opportunity to peruse the latest edition and to get our fill of all things prehistoric.  The striking front cover is from the talented and world-renowned British palaeoartist John Sibbick and inside it is revealed that this is John’s tenth cover art contribution.  The artwork was inspired by the fossil discoveries from the famous “Dinosaur Cove and East Gippsland” locations in Victoria, Australia.  The illustration depicts a group of big-eyed Leaellynasaura  being surprised by an allosaurid in the long, cold polar night.

The Front Cover Artwork for “Prehistoric Times” Issue 132 (Winter 2020)

Prehistoric Times magazine (issue 132).

Prehistoric Times winter 2020 edition (issue 132).  The front cover artwork was supplied by British palaeoartist John Sibbick.

Picture Credit: Mike Fredericks

A “Double O” Edition

Team members have described this latest instalment of this quarterly magazine as the “double O” edition.  Phil Hore provides profiles on both the pterosaur Ornithocheirus, confusing Cambridge Greensand fossil material included and the Asian hadrosaur Olorotitan.  Look out for an article entitled “Old School Charm” by Sean Kotz which examines the Charles R. Knight-inspired Tyrannosaurus rex that depicts this famous theropod as it was seen by the scientific community over a hundred years ago.  We are brought right up to date with the Paleonews section and the “What’s New in Review” double-page spread – Everything Dinosaur gets a mention:

“Thanks to Everything Dinosaur of England with information on upcoming prehistoric animals Everything DinosaurIt is a great store and internet site”.

Drawing Diplodocus

Concluding his article on Diplodocus, Tracy Lee Ford, looks at how the head and neck of this famous sauropod is constructed.  Cue lots of helpful information on diplodocid necks and posture.  Palaeontologist Ken Carpenter has penned a couple of contributions, look out for his article discussing the proposed revision of Amphicoelias as a huge rebbachisaurid sauropod, it seems that the Sauropoda are very well represented in issue 132.

Different Potential Feeding Strategies for Diplodocus are Highlighted in Tracy Lee Ford’s “How to Draw Dinosaurs Section”

CollectA rearing Diplodocus - grey

New for 2020 CollectA rearing Diplodocus – grey.  Lots of helpful advice on how to draw diplodocids in the winter edition of “Prehistoric Times”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Early Avians – Burian

As always there are wonderful examples of reader’s artwork throughout the magazine.  The Olorotitan versus Alioramus by J. A. Chirinos, M. Elliot Maisson’s cephalopod crunching Ornithocheirus and the three-dimensional model of Anchiornis by young Phoebe Wood, which is on display in the South Australia Museum, all deserve a special mention.  The evocative of artwork of Zdeněk Burian focuses on early avians, our thanks to John Lavas for producing such an excellent article with wonderful examples of Burian’s work.  Team members felt a very real sense of nostalgia viewing Burian’s depiction of Archaeopteryx lithographica.  These types of illustrations adorn many of the dinosaur and prehistoric animal books that our staff have on their bookshelves.  We suspect dinosaur fans have a portion of any shelving dedicated to their prehistoric animal collection.  Randy Knoll provides an instructive guide to numerous dinosaur models and places them in relation to the geological formations from whence the fossil material that inspired the models came.

Packed full of informative and beautifully illustrated articles and we did not even mention the Kathryn Abbott interview or the chat with Matt Mossbrucker.

“Prehistoric Times” magazine is a fantastic publication aimed at the discerning prehistoric animal model collector and dinosaur fan.  Further information about obtaining a subscription: “Prehistoric Times Magazine.”

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