All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Adobe CS5

Everything Dinosaur’s work with photoshop and other platforms.

9 04, 2018

Late Triassic Giant Ichthyosaurs

By | April 9th, 2018|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Scientists Identify Giant Triassic Ichthyosaur Jaw Bone and Help Solve 19th Century Fossil Mystery

Scientists have identified a jaw bone of a giant marine reptile, that could represent one of the largest animals that ever lived.  The newly described fossil bones, representing a portion of an enormous lower jaw, may also have shed light on a mystery that dates back to the middle of the 19th Century.  The fossilised jaw, which consists of several, broken, individual pieces, is thought to be an incomplete surangular (bone from the rear of the lower jaw), from a shastasaurid Ichthyosaur, a clade of enigmatic, giant marine reptiles that were geographically widespread during the Late Triassic.  The fossil material was found on the beach at the small village of Lilstock in (west Somerset), the specimen is approximately 205 million years old.

A Lateral View of the Fossil Material – A Giant Ichthyosaur from Somerset!

Incomplete surangular from a giant Triassic Ichthyosaur.

The incomplete surangular jaw bone from Lilstock (Somerset).

Picture Credit: Manchester University

Found on a Somerset Beach

Fossil collector and co-author of the study, published in the scientific journal PLOS One, Paul de la Salle, found a portion of the specimen in May 2016.  He later returned to the beach and found more pieces, that together form a partial surangular more than a metre in length (see photograph above).

An Approximate Representation of the Location of Surangular on the Skull of Shonisaurus

The surangular bone of Shonisaurus is highlighted.

A close-up of the skull of Shonisaurus, the surangular bone is outlined in red.

Picture Credit: Scott Hartman with additional annotation by Everything Dinosaur

Commenting on his fossil find Paul stated:

“Initially, the bone just looked like a piece of rock but, after recognising a groove and bone structure, I thought it might be part of a jaw from an Ichthyosaur and immediately contacted Ichthyosaur experts Dean Lomax (Manchester University) and Professor Judy Massare (SUNY College at Brockport, New York, USA), who expressed interest in studying the specimen.  I also contacted Dr Ramues Gallois, a geologist who visited the site and determined the age of the specimen stratigraphically.”

Comparisons with Shonisaurus sikanniensis

Dean Lomax and Judy Massare made the surangular identification and visited the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Drumheller, southern Alberta (Canada), to view skull material from the largest Ichthyosaur yet described, the monstrous shastasaurid Shonisaurus sikanniensis.  S. sikanniensis fossils come from Upper Triassic rocks found in British Columbia and the Royal Tyrrell material indicates a marine reptile around 21 metres in length.  The researchers found similarities between the new Somerset specimen and Shonisaurus sikanniensis, which suggests that the Lilstock fossils represent a giant shastasaurid too.

A Life Restoration and Skeletal Drawing of the Giant Ichthyosaur Shonisaurus

Shonisaurus life and skeletal reconstruction.

Shonisaurus life restoration and skeletal reconstruction (N. Tamura and S. Hartman).

Picture Credit: Nobumichi Tamura and Scott Hartman

As Big as a Blue Whale?

Commenting on the approximate size of the Somerset specimen, Dean Lomax said:

“As the specimen is represented only by a large piece of jaw, it is difficult to provide a size estimate, but by using a simple scaling factor and comparing the same bone in S. sikanniensis, the Lilstock specimen is about 25% larger.  Other comparisons suggest that the Lilstock Ichthyosaur was at least 20 to 25 metres.  Of course, such estimates are not entirely realistic because of the differences between species.  Nonetheless, simple scaling is commonly used to estimate size, especially when comparative material is scarce.”

When compared to giant marine vertebrates today, the upper end of the size estimate for the Lilstock specimen would indicate a creature longer than the largest toothed whale, the Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), indeed, at around 25 metres long, it would rival in size the largest cetaceans of all, adult Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus).

A Pair of Giant Shastasaurid Ichthyosaurs Cruise the Late Triassic Ocean with a Pod of Smaller Ichthyosaurs for Company

Shonisaurus illustrated.

A pair of Shonisaurus – giant marine reptiles of the Late Triassic.

Picture Credit: Nobumichi Tamura

Solving a Mystery That Dates Back to 1850

In 1850, a large bone was described from the Upper Triassic sediments of Aust Cliff in Gloucestershire (UK).  Four other fragmentary bone elements were subsequently found and described.  Sadly, two of these fossils are missing and presumed destroyed.  These bone shafts have been assigned to limb bones of herbivorous dinosaurs.  Two of the fossils were thought to resemble the limbs of Stegosaurs, but if that was the case, it would push back the evolutionary origins of Stegosaurs into the Norian faunal stage of the Late Triassic.  Other scientists have speculated that the fossil material might not be dinosaurian at all, but fossils of a related Archosaur from the pseudosuchian lineage.  However, with the discovery of the Lilstock specimen, another possibility has come to light.  These fossils could represent jaw fragments of giant, previously unrecognised Ichthyosaurs, after all, the Aust Cliff location has already yielded a number of marine reptile fossils including Ichthyosaurs.

Dean Lomax added:

“One of the Aust bones might also be an Ichthyosaur surangular.  If it is, by comparison with the Lilstock specimen, it might represent a much larger animal.  To verify these findings, we need a complete giant Triassic Ichthyosaur from the UK – a lot easier said than done!”

The scientific paper: “A Giant Late Triassic Ichthyosaur from the UK and a Reinterpretation of the Aust Cliff “Dinosaurian” Bones by Lomax, D. R., De la Salle, P., Massare, J. A. and Gallois, R. (2018) published in PLOS One.

19 03, 2018

Everything Dinosaur March Newsletter

By | March 19th, 2018|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Newsletters, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Rebor Fallen Queen, Straight-tusked Elephants and Paleo-Creatures Feature in Newsletter

Everything Dinosaur’s latest customer newsletter has been circulated and it contains lots of helpful information about new products, stocking levels and updates on forthcoming introductions.  The headline features the return of the extremely popular Rebor Fallen Queen (Triceratops horridus) figure.  Version two of this figure is back in production and Everything Dinosaur has received stocks of this super replica which makes a fantastic addition the Rebor King T. rex model.

The March Newsletter has Triceratops in the Headlines

The Rebor Triceratops figure (Fallen Queen) features in an Everything Dinosaur newsletter.

The Rebor T. horridus in the March newsletter from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Rebor Fallen Queen is a Stand Alone Figure or can be used in Conjunction with the Rebor 1:35 scale T. rex Replica

The Rebor Fallen Queen and the Rebor King T. rex.

The Rebor Fallen Queen (version 2) with the Rebor King T. rex figure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur customers who had requested a model be reserved for them have already been contacted.

To view the range of Rebor replicas available from Everything Dinosaur: Rebor Scale Models and Figures

Palaeoloxodon antiquus – Straight-tusked Elephant

On the subject of reserve lists, Everything Dinosaur’s priority reserve list for the second model in the Eofauna Scientific Research scale model series is now open.  The Straight-tusked elephant (P. antiquus) has already generated a lot of excitement after our joint press release with our friends at Eofauna.  A number of museums and other institutions have already made enquiries and this 1:35 scale figure will be with us in June.

Proving Very Popular Already – The Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked Elephant Model

Palaeoloxodon antiquus model reserve list.

The reserve list is now open for the Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked elephant.

Picture Credit: Eofauna Scientific Research/Everything Dinosaur

To join our priority reserve list for this stunning Straight-tusked elephant scale model, simply drop Everything Dinosaur an email: Email Everything Dinosaur

Leave the rest to us, you don’t have to have a memory like an elephant, we will reserve a figure for you and a team member will personally email you to let you know that the stock has arrived.

Extinct Animals from Paleo-Creatures and a Soft Toy Dodo

Our latest bulletin also features three new figures from Paleo-Creatures, the “sleeping dragon” Mei long, a marvellous Arthropleura model and especially for fans of early armoured dinosaurs, a splendid Scelidosaurus replica.  These new additions are in stock and currently available from Everything Dinosaur.

Paleo-Creatures Replicas and a Dodo Soft Toy

Paleo-Creatures and a Dodo soft toy.

Extinct creatures feature in the Everything Dinosaur March 2018 newsletter.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Paleo-Creatures range of hand-crafted prehistoric animals: Paleo-Creatures Models and Figures

Standing a fraction under twenty centimetres high, the new Dodo soft toy has been skilfully crafted and it looks incredibly cute.  There are just a few of these remarkable plush Dodos in stock so grab yours before they become extinct.  Best of all, you don’t have to travel all the way to Mauritius to pick one up.

The Dodo Soft Toy Available from Everything Dinosaur

Dodo soft toy.

Soft toy Dodo available from Everything Dinosaur

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the soft toy Dodo and other prehistoric animal soft toys: Prehistoric Animal Soft Toys

PNSO Triceratops “Doyle” and the Eofauna Scientific Research Steppe Mammoth

Concluding our latest newsletter, we feature the stunning and extremely rare PNSO Triceratops “Doyle” figure along with the very first figure in the Eofauna Scientific Research range, the 1:40 scale Steppe Mammoth model (Mammuthus trogontherii).  These two scale models have proved to be extremely popular with model collectors.

The PNSO Triceratops Figure “Doyle” and the Eofauna Scientific Research Steppe Mammoth

Eofauna Scientific Research Steppe Mammoth and the PNSO Triceratops (Doyle).

PNSO Triceratops Doyle and the Eofauna Scientific Research Steppe Mammoth.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Steppe Mammoth figure measures nineteen centimetres long and is just under twelve centimetres high at the shoulders, it can be found here: Eofauna Steppe Mammoth model

Coming from the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs range, the Triceratops “Doyle” is also in 1:35 scale, it measures around 26 centimetres in length and the base upon which the replica stands is a little over nineteen centimetres long.

The PNSO Triceratops “Doyle” can be viewed here: PNSO Age of Dinosaurs

We look forward to sending out more newsletters later on in the spring.  Remember, if you want to join our newsletter list simply drop Everything Dinosaur an email, expressing your wish to get our periodic newsletters: Email Everything Dinosaur to Subscribe to our Newsletter

18 03, 2018

Answering Questions About Diplodocus

By | March 18th, 2018|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Class 1 at Ysgol Bro Carmel Enquire About Diplodocus

The children in class 1 at Ysgol Bro Carmel Nursery and Primary School in North Wales have been learning all about dinosaurs this term.  The class teacher, Mrs Metcalfe emailed Everything Dinosaur and explained that as part of the diverse and varied teaching programme, the eager, young palaeontologists had some questions about Diplodocus for us.  A Diplodocus had been spotted in the school yard and the children had been writing instructions on how to trap this long-necked dinosaur.  Could Everything Dinosaur offer some assistance?

Diplodocus on Display at the Natural History Museum (London)

Diplodocus skeleton on display.

Diplodocus on display in a museum, this long-necked dinosaur is proving to be very popular with the Class 1 children at Ysgol Bro Carmel.

Answering Questions About Dinosaurs and Diplodocus

What Did Dinosaurs Eat?

Palaeontologists can work out what extinct dinosaurs liked to eat by looking at their fossilised teeth.  The shape of the teeth can tell a scientist a lot about the type of food that dinosaurs ate.  The teeth of Velociraptor are sharp, pointed and curved.  This suggests that Velociraptor was a meat-eater (carnivore).  The teeth of Diplodocus are a very different shape when compared to the teeth of the fearsome Velociraptor.  Diplodocus only had teeth at the front of its mouth, these teeth were thin and looked like pegs.

Comparing the Teeth of a Meat-eater (Velociraptor) to the Teeth of a Plant-eater (Diplodocus)

Teeth comparison (Velociraptor and Diplodocus).

Comparing the teeth of the carnivore Velociraptor to the herbivore Diplodocus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur from original illustrations by Michael Skrepnick and Zhao Chuang

Diplodocus was a plant-eater (herbivore), this dinosaur probably spent most of his life eating plants.

How is Diplodocus Different from Brontosaurus?

Diplodocus and Brontosaurus were closely related.  Both were plant-eaters and they probably liked to eat the same types of plants.  These long-necked dinosaurs lived in the Late Jurassic and their fossils have been found in the same country (United States of America).  Diplodocus was different from Brontosaurus in a number of ways, Diplodocus had a much longer tail and its neck was longer and more slender than Brontosaurus.  Brontosaurus was probably much heavier than Diplodocus.

Similarities and Differences Between Brontosaurus and Diplodocus

Diplodocus compared to Brontosaurus.

Brontosaurus compared to Diplodocus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

How big is a Diplodocus?

We have provided some information about the size of Diplodocus in the picture above.  Can the children work out how much longer Diplodocus was compared to Brontosaurus?  Why have we put a picture of a person next to our two dinosaur drawings (above), can the children think like scientists and come up with the answer?

How Could We Trap a Diplodocus if it was Alive?

Trying to trap a Diplodocus might be quite dangerous, after all, this plant-eating dinosaur was much bigger than any land animals alive today.  The children have probably come up with some amazing ideas and suggestions.  You could dig a big pit and cover it with tree branches then chase the Diplodocus towards the hole, if the Diplodocus fell in, it would probably get stuck, so long as the hole was deep enough.  However, this might hurt the dinosaur, so perhaps instead of trying to force the dinosaur to try and do something, it might be better to persuade it to come to you.

Since Diplodocus needed to eat a lot of plants, class 1 could perhaps persuade it to come and visit them by putting out some of its favourite food.  If the children collected lots and lots of ferns (Diplodocus probably ate around 200 kilograms of plants every day), filling a shopping trolley with Diplodocus treats, might persuade the dinosaur to come and visit the children in the playground.

Attracting Diplodocus into the Playground by Providing Some of its Favourite Food

Attracting a Diplodocus into the playground.

No need to catch a Diplodocus, try attracting it into the playground by leaving out some of its favourite food.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

People attract dinosaurs into their gardens every day, even though they probably don’t realise they are doing this.  Birds are so closely related to dinosaurs, that we should not call birds “birds” at all.  They are “avian dinosaurs”.  If you have a bird table at your school or in your garden you can watch dinosaurs feeding.  Check out the feet on birds like the sparrow, thrush and blackbird, they have claws just like a dinosaur and they walk on three toes just like Tyrannosaurus rex!

How Long is the Neck of a Diplodocus?  How Long is the Tail of Diplodocus?

A complete fossilised neck of Diplodocus has never been discovered.  All the bones that make up a tail of a Diplodocus have never been found.  When you visit a museum and see a spectacular mounted skeleton like “Dippy” the Diplodocus which used to be on display at the Natural History Museum (London), the skeleton you see consists of the bones of several individuals put together to make a single exhibit.  Missing bones are made as models and added to the skeleton to make it look complete.  Most palaeontologists think that Diplodocus had around fourteen or fifteen neck bones and the neck measured about eight metres long.  A baby Diplodocus had a relatively short neck, when it hatched (as far as we know, all dinosaurs hatched from eggs, just like birds today), as the Diplodocus grew, its neck got longer and longer.  The whip-like tail of Diplodocus was longer than its neck.  Size estimates for the tail of a Diplodocus are difficult to make, but Everything Dinosaur’s fossil experts suggest that the tail of a fully-grown Diplodocus could have been around fourteen metres long, that’s longer than a Badminton court!

Comparing a Diplodocus to Large Land Animals Alive Today

How big was Diplodocus?

Diplodocus compared to animals alive today.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our thanks to all the children in class 1 at Ysgol Bro Carmel Nursery and Primary School, we hope our answers to your questions help you with your term topic.

4 03, 2018

Celebrating 4,000 Blog Posts

By | March 4th, 2018|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Reaches Landmark of 4,000 Blog Posts

Team members at Everything Dinosaur are celebrating the landmark of having achieved 4,000 blog posts.  Since our first article was posted up in May 2007, a lot has happened in the world of palaeontology and the Earth sciences in general.  We have done our best to update readers on these exciting developments, covering news stories, fossil discoveries, new dinosaurs, updates on extinction theories, breakthroughs in the use of research technologies and so much more.  For model collectors and dinosaur fans, we have seen entire ranges come and go and just like the study of the Dinosauria, which is often thought of being in a golden age of discovery, so collectors of models seem to be in a golden age when it comes to prehistoric animal replicas and figures.

Everything Dinosaur Celebrates Posting Up 4,000 Blog Articles

4,000 articles on the Everything Dinosaur blog.

Everything Dinosaur celebrates posting up 4,000 blog articles.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our First Thank You

A very big thank you to all the researchers, press officers, undergraduates, university professors, field team members, media companies, professional palaeontologists, dedicated fossil collectors, teachers, manufacturers, scientists and prehistoric animal fans who have shared stories with us so that we can post them up on this weblog.  We really do appreciate all the help and assistance that we have had along the way.

Our Iguanodon Gives Everyone a Big Thumbs Up!

 

Iguanodon thumbs up!

Praise from a dinosaur!  A big thank you to all our contributors and to our readers.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our Second Thank You

Also, a very big thank you to all our readers, feedback providers, reviewers, commentators, email senders, letter writers, picture takers and so forth that have helped keep our blog so fresh, vibrant and diverse.  We will continue to strive to bring you updates on research, information on new discoveries and photographs of fossils and other amazing wonders.  Next week’s blog postings are already in place, we can’t give too much away at this time as a number of them have embargoes, but what we can say is that the next few posts will reflect the aims and objectives of our weblog, to educate, inform and indulge fans of dinosaurs and prehistoric animals.

One article scheduled for release next week has been written with the co-operation of the University of Manchester, it covers research into an aspect of Cretaceous Theropod behaviour.  Another article prepared and ready for adding in the next few days has been compiled in collaboration with Eofauna Scientific Research, we will be announcing the next prehistoric animal figure in this exciting, new model range.  We will also be posting up some exclusive photographs of the new Eofauna Scientific Research model.

Wonder what exciting scientific developments, discoveries and new products we will be covering in the next 1,000 posts?

3 01, 2018

Preparing New Outlook Signatures

By | January 3rd, 2018|Adobe CS5, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Preparing New Signatures for Emails

This week sees the installation of new computers at Everything Dinosaur.  This has given team members the opportunity to prepare new email signatures and other items as the new systems are installed in our offices.  With so many new items due to come into stock, it is a question of what products we should promote in our e-signatures along with what other information should we include in emails to customers.

Everything Dinosaur is expecting around fifty new models coming into our warehouse over the next twelve weeks or so.  We are expecting new products from Schleich, Papo, Mojo Fun, CollectA, Beasts of the Mesozoic, plus more stock of PNSO models and figures.  For our first signature of 2018, we have chosen to promote the Beasts of the Mesozoic range, an exciting range of 1:6 scale figures that represent (mostly) dromaeosaurids, although ironically, our Beasts of the Mesozoic signature features Balaur bondoc, which is now classified as a large, flightless bird and not a member of the Dromaeosauridae.

Preparing New Email Signatures for Everything Dinosaur

Beasts of the Mesozoic Balaur bondoc model.

Beasts of the Mesozoic “Raptors” Coming to Everything Dinosaur in 2018.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Preparing for All the New Products

Reserve lists have been operating for some months and several fact sheets have already been prepared along with scientifically accurate scale drawings.  Room has been allocated within our warehouse to receive the new products and we are looking forward to highlighting all the new arrivals on our blog and social media pages.  Look out for updates and featured articles being posted up on this weblog.

1 01, 2018

Happy New Year

By | January 1st, 2018|Adobe CS5, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Happy New Year

Just time to wish all our blog readers and Everything Dinosaur customers a happy new year.  We are going to be very busy in 2018 and we have a lot to look forward too, but first we say a big thank you to all our customers who supported us in 2017 and a special thank you to all those people who gave our Facebook page a “like” over the last twelve months or so.

Happy New Year from Everything Dinosaur

Happy New Year 2018.

Happy New Year from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

More than 1,ooo Facebook Likes

The picture above will be posted up onto Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page.  On January 1st 2017, our Facebook site had 3,303 “likes” and we set ourselves the challenge of getting up to 4,000 “likes” by the end of the year.  We are proud to announce that over the last twelve months, we have earned over 1,000 Facebook “likes” and we currently have a total of 4,345.  Our thanks to everyone who gave us a “like” on our Facebook page, we are truly humbled.

We believe customer service is the key to getting "likes".

Over 4,300 Facebook “likes”.

Feel free to click on the Facebook logo to visit Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page, or simply click this link: Visit Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook Page

New for 2018

Everything Dinosaur has big plans for 2018, look out for more stock of the exceptionally rare PNSO models, plus the launch of the Beasts of the Mesozoic replica range along with new figures from Eofauna Scientific Research, CollectA, Schleich, Mojo Fun and Papo.

In the meantime,

Happy New Year!  We wish everyone a peaceful and prosperous 2018.

23 12, 2017

Safari Ltd Prehistoric Animals 2018

By | December 23rd, 2017|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

2018 Safari Ltd Prehistoric Animal Models are in Stock at Everything Dinosaur

The new for 2018 prehistoric animal models from Safari Ltd are now in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  What a lovely surprise for Christmas, all the new Safari Ltd Wild Safari Prehistoric World prehistoric animals are available from Everything Dinosaur and we even have the prehistoric horse (Przewalski’s horse), in stock for good measure.

New for 2018 Prehistoric Animal Models (Safari Ltd)

Safari Ltd models 2018.

New prehistoric animal models in stock at Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The list of new prehistoric animal models is most impressive, there is an Amargasaurus, an American Mastodon, Uintatherium, Daeodon, Ankylosaurus, Dimetrodon, Macrauchenia, the North American caenagnathid Anzu wyliei and a Malawisaurus.  In addition, Safari Ltd have introduced Hyaenodon gigas, two horned dinosaurs Regaliceratops and Triceratops.  There is also a Megacerops and we have added the Safari Ltd Winners Circle Przewalski’s horse.

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Models

Since the retirement of the Carnegie Collectibles range in 2015, Safari Ltd have set about replacing the dinosaurs that featured in that scale model series.  Hence the introduction of Amargasaurus and Ankylosaurus.  It is great to see a new representation of the Pelycosaur Dimetrodon introduced as well.  The 2018 dinosaurs also feature some new dinosaurs, modelled by Safari Ltd for the first time.  Malawisaurus, Regaliceratops and the feathered Anzu wyliei also join the range.

The New for 2018 Dinosaur Models from Safari Ltd

Safari Ltd dinosaurs 2018.

The new for 2018 dinosaurs from Safari Ltd.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Fact Sheets

As with all the named dinosaur and prehistoric animal models that we sell, each model is supplied with its own fact sheet.  Our team members have had to research and write three new fact sheets to accommodate these models, namely fact sheets for Anzu wyliei, the American Mastodon and the African Sauropod Malawisaurus.

The Scale Drawing of Anzu wyliei Prepared for the Dinosaur Fact Sheet

Anzu wyliei scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Anzu wyliei.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Only One Theropod

The models are very well made and superbly painted.  Everything Dinosaur congratulates Safari Ltd on the quality of these new introductions.  They also deserve praise for creating such a diverse range of dinosaurs and mammals, plus of course the Dimetrodon, that is more closely related to mammals than it is to the Dinosauria.  It is interesting to note that there is only one Theropod in the fourteen replicas that Everything Dinosaur has brought into the warehouse.  The one Theropod is Anzu wyliei and it is not typical of the Theropoda.  For a start it is edentulous (toothless) and it possessed a beak.   The most striking feature of this dinosaur nicknamed “the chicken from Hell”, as all the A. wyliei fossil material has come from exposures that represent the famous Hell Creek Formation, is the bizarre rounded crest on the top of the head.  The crest superficially resembles the crest on an extant Cassowary (Casuarius genus).

To view the fourteen new for 2018 Safari Ltd prehistoric animals, including the Przewalski’s horse click here: Safari Ltd Wild Safari Prehistoric World

24 09, 2017

Everything Dinosaur Websites Upgraded to HTTPS

By | September 24th, 2017|Adobe CS5, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Websites – All Upgraded to HTTPS

As part of our on-going commitment to customer service, every one of Everything Dinosaur’s websites have completed the upgrade to HTTPS status.  This acronym stands for “Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure”, which means that the data sent between your browser and our website as you read this blog post is encrypted.  By upgrading from HTTP to HTTPS, were helping to protect your data from any third party that might want to have this information.  Although our blog site does not collect personal data, we welcome customer comments and feedback and, as a result, our visitors can be assured that Everything Dinosaur is taking their personal on-line security very seriously.

All Everything Dinosaur’s Websites Have HTTPS Security

Helping to keep visitors safe and secure (HTTPS).

The Everything Dinosaur blog site has HTTPS.  Helping to keep visitor data safe and secure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our TLS (Transport Layer Security protocols), are used to encrypt the transmitted information to secure identities and other personal information in cyberspace.   As a general guideline, all websites should have a TLS or, as it is sometimes known, a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate to ensure data integrity, effective encryption and to support website authentication.  Even though this blog site (our dinosaurs for schools site as well), does not collect financial information or personal data of that nature, with the big search engines placing greater emphasis on security, we thought it would be best to convert all our sites to HTTPS, not just or main website: Everything Dinosaur.

Building Trust Helping to Avoid Nasty Surprises

When someone visits this blog site, our on-line shop, or visits our specialist site for schools: Dinosaur Workshops in School they can be assured that they are visiting a secure site.  A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“With the HTTPS configuration users can be assured that the website is secured and they can be confident exploring our huge web log, after all, just like the dinosaurs 66 million years ago, nobody likes nasty surprises!”

Everything Dinosaur’s Secure Websites Helps Avoid Nasty Surprises

The extinction of the dinosaurs.

HTTPS helps avoid nasty surprises.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Benefits of HTTPS on Websites

Having upgraded to HTTPS is not going to protect the planet from extra-terrestrial impacts, however there are a number of benefits such as:

  • Authentication – HTTPS ensures that users communicate with the intended website, it prevents data hijacking and “middle-man” attacks.  When you communicate with us via our websites, be it by leaving comments, placing orders, or by other means, you can be assured that you are communicating with us.
  • Encryption – Safe from unwanted eavesdroppers, when sending data via HTTPS, no-one can “listen in”, data cannot be tracked across multiple pages and information cannot be stolen.
  • Integrity of data – Information cannot be changed, modified or corrupted during the transfer.

Everything Dinosaur’s Commercial Website Upgraded to HTTPS Some Time Ago

HTTPS a secure website.

New security safeguards added to Everything Dinosaur’s website.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Search engines in future may notify browsers that they are visiting a site without HTTPS, but you can always check by examining the websites address in the page tool bar.

18 08, 2017

How the Chloroplast Got Started

By | August 18th, 2017|Adobe CS5, Animal News Stories, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Main Page|0 Comments

The Origin of the Chloroplast

At the centre of most of our planet’s ecosystems are plants and algae that utilise sunlight and transform carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and release oxygen.  These very specialised organisms can make their own food, by using light energy combined with CO2 and H2O.  As part of this process, the water molecule is split and oxygen is produced as a by-product.  This process takes place in specialised subunits within a cell called a chloroplast.

Plants and Algae are Fundamental to Most Food Chains on the Planet

Tropical ferns in the forest.

Plants and algae form the basis for most of Earth’s biota.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The theory as to how algae and plants evolved goes something like this – an ancient single-celled eukaryote absorbed a photosynthesising bacterium (blue-green algae otherwise known as photosynthesising cyanobacteria).  Such an event would normally have been disastrous for both parties, but for some reason, both the eukaryote and the cyanobacteria survived and this led to the development of a symbiotic association.  Whilst it is accepted that the cyanobacteria are the ancestors of the chloroplast, it is not clear which of the myriad of cyanobacteria are the closest relations of the chloroplast and when this association began, or indeed where on our planet this fortuitous event took place.

The Evolution of More Complex Life Via the Symbiotic Fusing of Different Kinds of Bacteria

The origins of complex life.

Complex eukaryote cells evolved by the symbiotic fusing of different kinds of bacteria.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The diagram above shows one theory of how more complex lifeforms evolved.  Four different types of bacteria, each with their own specific adaptations and biological characteristics may have merged to create the three main forms of multi-cellular life – animals, plants and fungi.

  • Merger 1 – Bacteria with the ability to produce food via fermentation merged with a swimming bacterium.
  • Merger 2 – An oxygen utilising bacterium invaded this first host and formed the cell mitochondria.
  • Merger 3 – Algae fused with photosynthesising cyanobacteria, which then became the cell chloroplast – the subject of the newly published study.

A team of scientists, including researchers from Bristol University, may have found the answers to these questions.  Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they postulate that the chloroplast lineage split from their closet cyanobacterial ancestor more than 2.1 billion years ago and this took place in low salinity environments.  The team conclude that it took another 200 million years for the chloroplast and the eukaryotic host to be fully united into a symbiotic relationship.  Marine algae groups diversified much later, at around 800 to 750 million years ago, sometime in the Neoproterozoic Era.

Lead author of the study, Dr Patricia Sanchez-Baracaldo (University of Bristol’s School of Geographical Sciences), commented:

“The results of this study imply that complex organisms such as algae first evolved in freshwater environments, and later colonised marine environments – these results also have huge implications to understanding the carbon cycle.  Genomic data and sophisticated evolutionary methods can now be used to draw a more complete picture of early life on land; complementing what has been previously inferred from the fossil record.”

Co-author, Professor Davide Pisani (Bristol University) added:

“Our planet is a beautiful place and it exists in such a sharp contrast with the rest of the solar system.  Think about those beautiful satellite pictures where you see the green of the forests and the blue/green tone of the water.  Well, Earth was not like that before photosynthesis.  Before photosynthesis it was an alien place, uninhabitable by humans.  Here we made some big steps to clarify how Earth become the planet we know today, and I think that that is just wonderful.”

The team used a combination of phylogenomic and Bayesian analytical methods to conclude that the chloroplast lineage branched deep within the cyanobacterial tree of life, around 2.1 billion years ago, and ancestral trait reconstruction places this event in low-salinity environments.  The chloroplast took another 200 million years to become established, with most extant (modern groups living today), forms originating much later.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a Bristol University press release in the compilation of this article.

13 03, 2017

A Purple Woolly Mammoth Inspires Dexter and His Classmates

By | March 13th, 2017|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Whirley Primary School Reception Children Study Dinosaurs

Children in the Reception class at Whirley Primary School have been studying dinosaurs and learning about fossils this half term.  Under the expert guidance of their teachers, the children have been looking at different types of dinosaur and working out which ones ate meat and which ones ate plants.  Tyrannosaurus rex is certainly a big favourite amongst the enthusiastic, young palaeontologists and the pupils enjoyed learning lots of new facts about T. rex during a dinosaur themed workshop.  For many schools, this week is “Science Week” and it was great to see the Foundation Stage children joining in and using their big brains (which are twenty times the size of an armoured dinosaur’s brain), to remember where they had been sitting.

Working in the hall, our dinosaur expert was surrounded by wonderful art displays created by the schoolchildren, including some wonderful illustrations of erupting volcanoes by Mr Jackson’s Year 3 class.  Our dinosaur expert felt very much at home surrounded by such colourful drawings.

Year 3 Have Been Study Rocks Including How Igneous Rock is Formed

Volcano drawings by Year 3.

Drawings of volcanoes.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

A Purple Woolly Mammoth

Some of the Reception children found a purple Woolly Mammoth model in their classroom.  The teacher explained that dinosaurs lived a long time ago, millions of years before Woolly Mammoths and people.  Young Dexter was so intrigued to hear about Woolly Mammoths that he was inspired to draw a Woolly Mammoth for himself.

Foundation Stage Children Draw a Woolly Mammoth

A Foundation Stage pupil draws a Mammoth.

A child in Reception class draws a Woolly Mammoth.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Dexter/Everything Dinosaur

That’s a great drawing, Dexter’s teacher was very proud as he had written the words “Woolly Mammoth” and “tusks” on his illustration.  Well done Dexter!

Reception Children Write on their Prehistoric Animal Drawings

Labelling a Woolly Mammoth.

Helping young children become more confident with their writing.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Dexter/Everything Dinosaur

We set the children an extension activity.  In return for some dinosaur stickers, could the children have a go at drawing their very own dinosaur?  Could they label its body parts including the skull?  We hope the picture of a purple coloured Woolly Mammoth helps to inspire the children with their prehistoric animal designs.

A Purple Woolly Mammoth Drawing for the Reception Children at Whirley Primary School

A purple Woolly Mammoth.

A purple coloured Woolly Mammoth for Reception class.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Dexter/Everything Dinosaur

Can the children label the purple Woolly Mammoth’s body parts?  Can they label the skull?

All to soon the morning had come to an end and it was time to pack up so that the lunchtime supervisors could set up the tables ready for the school dinners.  Not to worry, we provided an assortment of teaching materials and other resources to the enthusiastic teaching team to help them carry on with this stimulating and challenging Foundation Stage term topic.

Load More Posts