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26 11, 2020

Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum – A Dinosaur from a “Rubbish Dump”

By | November 26th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum – A Dinosaur from a “Rubbish Dump”

This year (2020), saw the publication of a scientific paper describing a new species of Late Triassic non-sauropodan sauropodomorph from southern Africa.  The dinosaur named Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum, at around nine to ten metres in length, was one of the largest animals living in that part of Gondwana during the Norian stage of the Triassic.   Surprisingly, for such a big animal, the fossils indicate that this dinosaur was bipedal.

A Life Reconstruction of Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum

Life reconstruction Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum.

Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum life reconstruction.  Note scale bar equals 1 metre.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The fragmentary fossils consisting of post-cranial material, including most notably, a robust lower leg bone (tibia), represent several individuals and these fossils first came to light in 1930, when Samuel Motsoane, a leading member of the Paris Evangelical Mission School located at Bethesda in Lesotho, found several disarticulated dinosaur bones.

It was not until 1955 that a formal survey and excavation of the area was carried out.  Brothers Paul and François Ellenberger mapped and excavated a small area uncovering a mono-dominant bonebed representing numerous individuals.  The dig took place behind the back of a hut, within a few metres of the village rubbish dump.  Undeterred the brothers completed their work, publishing a preliminary description that year with a more detailed paper following in 1956 which was published by the French Geology Society (Societe Geologique de France).

The Maphutseng assemblage has been mentioned in several papers and named on two occasions but never formally published.  Back in the spring, this omission was rectified and this dinosaur was finally formally scientifically described (Peyre de Fabrègues & Allain).  Two months before the scientific paper came out, the UK Government Foreign and Commonwealth Office via The National Archives made available on-line thousands of rare images of Africa, showing a century of British involvement on the continent.

One of those black and white images in the Lesotho section showed a dinosaur fossil excavation.  There was a photographic record of the “Maphutseng dinosaur”.

Excavating Dinosaur Fossils in Lesotho

Excavating dinosaur fossils in Lesotho (circa 1955).

A photograph from The National Archives showing a dinosaur fossil excavation in Lesotho.  The photograph is believed to show the excavation of the Late Triassic sauropodomorph Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum.

Picture Credit: Alwyn Bisschoff/The National Archives (catalogue reference Part of CO 1069/209)

The photograph (above), might be just one of thousands of rare images of Africa made available on-line by The National Archives in a project entitled “Africa Through a Lens”, but it shows (most likely), one of the Ellenberger brothers carefully exposing the Kholumolumo fossil material.

Everything Dinosaur is not aware of a photographic record of the rubbish dump being preserved for posterity.

Kholumolumo ellenbergerorum

Despite the large size of this taxon (around 9-10 metres in length), with an estimated body mass of approximately 1.7 tonnes, the researchers (Peyre de Fabrègues & Allain), did not think Kholumolumo was linked to the origin of the Sauropoda, an Order of the Dinosauria famous for consisting of the largest terrestrial vertebrates known to science.

Kholumolumo (pronounced Ko-lum-oh-loo-mo) is derived from the local Sotho dialect for a mythical reptilian beast, whilst the specific or trivial name honours the Ellenberger brothers.

25 11, 2020

First Dinosaur Remains from Ireland

By | November 25th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

First Dinosaur Remains from Ireland

Scientists from the University of Portsmouth, National Museums of Ireland and Queen’s University Belfast have confirmed that fossils found by the late Roger Byrne on the east coast of County Antrim (Northern Ireland), are dinosaur bones.  These are the only dinosaur bones known from the island of Ireland.  Roger Byrne donated a number of specimens to Ulster Museum but they had not been closely studied, a scientific paper published in the Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association remedies that and confirms that two of the pieces are Dinosaurian and although they were found at the same location, they represent bones from two different dinosaurs.

Lead Researcher Dr Mike Simms Holding the Two Dinosaur Fossil Bones

Dr Mike Simms holds the two precious fossils.

Dr Mike Simms (National Museums Northern Ireland) holds the theropod tibia on the left and the thyreophoran femur on the right.

Picture Credit: The University of Portsmouth

Lead author of the research Dr Mike Simms stated:

“This is a hugely significant discovery.  The great rarity of such fossils here is because most of Ireland’s rocks are the wrong age for dinosaurs, either too old or too young, making it nearly impossible to confirm dinosaurs existed on these shores.  The two dinosaur fossils that Roger Byrne found were perhaps swept out to sea, alive or dead, sinking to the Jurassic seabed where they were buried and fossilised.”

Lias Group Exposures

The two fossil bones found by the Roger Byrne, a schoolteacher and avid fossil collector, come from Lower Jurassic strata exposed in Islandmagee.  They had been suspected of representing dinosaur bones, although they were found in marine deposits.  A detailed analysis of their histology and shape indicated that two of the pieces that Roger donated were indeed the bones of dinosaurs.  Originally, it had been thought that the bones represented a single type of dinosaur but the research team were surprised to discover that they represent bones from two very different types.

One specimen has been interpreted as the proximal end of the left femur of a basal thyreophoran ornithischian.  It has been tentatively assigned to Scelidosaurus, a primitive armoured dinosaur, fossils of which are known from Dorset (southern England) and date from the Sinemurian to the Pliensbachian faunal stages of the Early Jurassic.  The strata from which the femur fragment was found dates from slightly earlier, both the fossil bones are around 200 million years old.

A Model of the Early Armoured Dinosaur Scelidosaurus

CollectA Scelidosaurus model.

A model of a Scelidosaurus.  The CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Scelidosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Evidence of a Meat-eating Dinosaur

The second fragment of bone has been identified as the proximal part of the left tibia of an indeterminate neotheropod, perhaps a member of the averostran-line similar to Sarcosaurus, or a megalosauroid.  Sarcosaurus fossils are associated with Lower Jurassic strata (Hettangian-Sinemurian faunal stages), of England.  Together, the two fossil bones represent the first dinosaur remains reported anywhere in Ireland and some of the west westerly in Europe.

An Illustration of Sarcosaurus

Sarcosaurus drawing.

Sarcosaurus scale drawing.  A speculative drawing of the Early Jurassic theropod Sarcosaurus.  It is not known whether this dinosaur had head crests like the distantly related Dilophosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The researchers used high-resolution, three-dimensional replicas to confirm the identity of the items donated by Roger Byrne.

University of Portsmouth researcher Robert Smyth explained:

“Analysing the shape and internal structure of the bones, we realised that they belonged to two very different animals.  One is very dense and robust, typical of an armoured plant-eater.  The other is slender, with thin bone walls and characteristics found only in fast-moving two-legged predatory dinosaurs called theropods.”

An Illustration of the Fossil Bones from County Antrim

Illustrations of the dinosaur bones from County Antrim.

Drawings of the dinosaur fossil bones by the late Roger Byrne and incorporated into the scientific paper.  Illustrations e, f, k and l are views of the theropod partial tibia and d, e are illustrations of the partial femur assigned to Scelidosaurus.  Note scale bar 5 cm.

Picture Credit: Roger Byrne/National Museums of Ireland

Very Important Fossil Discoveries

Despite their fragmentary and weathered nature, these fossils are extremely important as they date from the Hettangian stage of the Early Jurassic, shortly after the End Triassic extinction event when the Dinosauria start to diversify and become more widespread.  Very few dinosaur fossils are known from this stage of the Early Jurassic, so Roger’s fossils are globally significant.

One of the other items donated by Roger Byrne probably represents an element from the skull or jawbone from a large marine reptile, perhaps an ichthyosaur or a pliosaur, whilst a polygonal-shaped piece was determined not to be a fossil at all, but a piece of Palaeocene basalt, similar to that found at the famous Giant’s Causeway on the northern coast of County Antrim.

Scelidosaurus a Beachcomber?

Commenting on the number of Scelidosaurus fossils associated with marine deposits, Professor Martill (University of Portsmouth), suggested:

“Scelidosaurus keeps on turning up in marine strata, and I am beginning to think that it may have been a coastal animal, perhaps even eating seaweed like marine iguanas do today.”

The fossils were on display at the Ulster Museum during the “Dippy on Tour” exhibition in 2018, but it is hoped that these important fossil bones will be able to go on permanent display once the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from the University of Portsmouth in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “First dinosaur remains from Ireland” by Michael J. Simms, Robert S.H. Smyth, David M. Martill, Patrick C. Collins and Roger Byrne published in the Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association.

25 11, 2020

CollectA New for 2021 Models (Part 3) Video

By | November 25th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases, Product Reviews|0 Comments

CollectA New for 2021 Models (Part 3) Video

Having posted up information about the latest batch of new for 2021 prehistoric animal models to be introduced by CollectA, team members put together a video review for Everything Dinosaur’s YouTube channel.  The video review provides information about the new Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus, discusses the famous mistake made by the American palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope and looks at the scientific evidence for giving this huge plesiosaur a tail fin (fluke).

The Everything Dinosaur Video Review of the New for 2021 CollectA Prehistoric Animal Figures (Part 3)

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Summarising the Scientific Evidence for a Tail Fluke in Plesiosaurs

Did Elasmosaurus have a tail fluke?

Providing information about the scientific evidence for a tail fluke in members of the Plesiosauroidea.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Xiphactinus Model

The YouTube video review lasts about thirteen and a half minutes and provides a comprehensive review of the new CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus, a contemporary of Elasmosaurus.  However, team members stress that this prehistoric fish was much more widely distributed and it was not limited to the Western Interior Seaway.

Looking at the Distribution of the Ancient Predatory Fish Xiphactinus

Distribution of Xiphactinus (geological and chronological evidence).

The widespread Xiphactinus (geographically and temporally).  Xiphactinus fossils are known from North America, Europe, Venezuela and even from the southern hemisphere (Argentina).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We recommend that you take a look at Everything Dinosaur on YouTube where you will find this new CollectA video review.  Here is a link to our YouTube channel: Everything Dinosaur – YouTube.

Everything Dinosaur encourages you to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

The New Set of CollectA Mini Prehistoric Animal Models

As well as providing information on fossils relating to Xiphactinus and Elasmosaurus, the new for 2021 set of mini prehistoric animal models is also discussed.  This set will feature ten figures, nine of which are entirely new sculpts.  These models are great for use in prehistoric landscapes or dinosaur dioramas where they can represent juveniles or sub-adults.

Reviewing the New for 2021 CollectA Mini Prehistoric Animal Model Set

CollectA mini prehistoric animal figures (set 3).

The new for 2021 set of mini prehistoric animals from CollectA features 10 figures.  There are 8 dinosaurs (Alamosaurus, Argentinosaurus, Iguanodon, Mapusaurus, Mercuriceratops, Oviraptor, Therizinosaurus and Utahraptor).   Also included in this set is a miniature replica of the marine reptile Pliosaurus and a flying reptile figure – Guidraco.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We aim to educate and inform with our CollectA model reviews.  Our intention is to provide some of the scientific information that is reflected in the figures.  For example, we examine amazing fossils showing the preserved remains of a victim entombed within the stomach cavity of a Xiphactinus audax specimen.  We discuss elasmosaurids and we provide pictures of plesiosaur tail bones that might indicate the presence of a tail fluke.  We have one more video to produce about new CollectA models for next year.  This video will be posted up on our YouTube channel next week.”

To see the existing range of CollectA Deluxe models: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models.

CollectA prehistoric animal models and figures: CollectA Prehistoric Life Models and Figures.

24 11, 2020

PNSO Sinosauropteryx

By | November 24th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

PNSO Sinosauropteryx prima

The popular PNSO Age of Dinosaurs range features a huge variety of different types of dinosaur and prehistoric animal.  However, at Everything Dinosaur, we are always delighted to see a dinosaur that once lived in China being produced as a replica by a company that is based in China.  One of our favourites from the PNSO portfolio epitomises this approach, the colourful PNSO Sinosauropteryx prima figure.

The PNSO Sinosauropteryx (S. prima) Dinosaur Model

PNSO Sinosauropteryx dinosaur model.

PNSO Yuyan the Sinosauropteryx dinosaur model.  A model of a compsognathid, fossils of which come from China.  The model has been carefully painted to reflect current scientific thinking about the colouration of this small theropod dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The PNSO Sinosauropteryx is number 039 in the “Prehistoric Animal Toys that Accompany your Growth” range of figures, it is available as a single purchase or part of the enormous, suitcase-sized set of 48 prehistoric animal figures.

The Special Edition PNSO Gift Box with Includes 039 Yuyan the Sinosauropteryx Model

Forty-eight models in the PNSO gift box.

PNSO special edition gift box.  A superb gift box containing 48 prehistoric animal figures from the PNSO “Prehistoric Animal Toys that Accompany your Growth” product portfolio.  This set does include the Yuyan (Sinosauropteryx) model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Sinosauropteryx prima

Named and described back in 1996, this little feathered dinosaur caused a sensation when its discovery was announced.  Whilst the discovery of feathered theropod dinosaurs has become more of routine event in the near quarter of a century since S. prima was named and scientifically described (Ji and Ji), Everything Dinosaur team members expect to report in the very near future about the finding of another feathered compsognathid, not from north-eastern China but from north-eastern Brazil.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“The Compsognathidae is a diverse and temporally widespread family of small, cursorial theropods.  We expect to post up a blog article soon about a bizarrely feathered compsognathid that roamed north-eastern Brazil around 110 million years ago.  We are so pleased to see models of compsognathids such as Sinosauropteryx being produced by mainstream model makers.”

Note

Everything Dinosaur’s post about the new South American compsognathid has now been published (December 15th, 2020).  The article featuring Ubirajara jubatus can be found here: One Very Flashy New Dinosaur – Ubirajara jubatus.

Sinosauropteryx is pronounced Sign-no-sore-opt-ter-iks  and it translates as “Chinese Lizard Wing”.  Ubirajara (pronounced You-bi-rah-jar-rah), has been placed within the Compsognathidae family, it is regarded as the sister genus to a clade formed between Compsognathus from the Late Jurassic of Europe and Sinosauropteryx from the Early Cretaceous of north-eastern China.

To view the PNSO Sinosauropteryx model and the rest of the figures in the PNSO prehistoric animal model range: PNSO Age of Dinosaurs.

23 11, 2020

The Dinosauria Not in Decline Prior to Mass Extinction Event

By | November 23rd, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

Dinosaur Diversification Rates not in Decline at the End of the Cretaceous

A team of international researchers including scientists from the London Natural History Museum and the University of Bath have undertaken an extensive and sophisticated statistical analysis to try to establish whether the dinosaurs were in terminal decline prior to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event that saw the demise of all non-avian forms.

The detailed Bayesian analysis suggests had the extra-terrestrial object not hit planet Earth, then the dinosaurs might have continued to dominate terrestrial ecosystems.

If the Bolide (Extra-terrestrial Object) had not Hit – Would the Non-avian Dinosaurs Still be Around Today?

The end of the non-avian dinosaurs.

An artist’s impression of the bolide about to impact with the Gulf of Mexico 66 million years ago.  Had this catastrophic event not occurred then the Dinosauria could have continued to dominate terrestrial ecosystems according to a new study.

Picture Credit: Chase Stone

How quickly the non-avian dinosaurs died out and what sort of health dinosaur populations were in around 66 million years ago has proved to be one of the most contentious issues in vertebrate palaeontology.  Some scientists argue that there were fewer genera of dinosaurs present in the Maastrichtian faunal stage of North America than in the preceding Campanian.  They propose that this is evidence to suggest that the non-avian members of the Dinosauria were in decline long before their final extinction.  Other scientists present data to support the idea that new species were still evolving and that the “terrible lizards” were showing no signs of being under population stress.

Were the Dinosaurs in Decline Prior to the K-Pg Extinction Event?

Ugrunaalik life reconstruction.

Hadrosaurs dominated many dinosaur-based ecosystems and some scientists have postulated that the relative lack of diversity in dinosaur families could represent evidence of populations being under stress.

Picture Credit: James Havens

Extensive disagreements remain over whether the extinction of the dinosaurs was a sudden catastrophic event, essentially instantaneous when measured in deep, geological time or whether their ultimate die-off was the culmination of long-term evolutionary trends.

Writing in the open-access, on-line journal “Royal Society Open Science”, the researchers which include Professor Paul Barrett (London Natural History Museum) and PhD student Joe Bonsor (University of Bath), used sophisticated Bayesian statistical analysis to model three competing theories against a variety of taxonomies and phylogenies representing the Dinosauria.

In essence, the study set out to test the match between three competing hypotheses with regards to the dinosaur species-richness during the Late Cretaceous:

1). No evidence of a global downturn in dinosaur speciation rates prior to the end of the Mesozoic.

2). There was a decline in dinosaur species-richness over a timescale of hundreds of thousands or several million years prior to the bolide impact due to the effect of climate change, rising sea levels and the Deccan flood basalt volcanism (plus other factors).

3). That the Dinosauria were in global decline with falling speciation rates from around 100 million years ago.

Twelve Phylogenies Analysed

Bayesian statistical analysis was used to assess the fit of twelve dinosaur phylogenies from various authors.  The researchers did not find strong support for the downturn model in their analyses, which suggests that dinosaur speciation rates were not in terminal decline prior to the K-Pg boundary and that the Dinosauria was still capable of generating new taxa and evolving into new species to exploit resources and environmental opportunities.

Dinosaurs Dominated Terrestrial Ecosystems

The Late Cretaceous of northern China

A dinosaur dominated ecosystem (northern China in the Late Cretaceous).  The study found no strong evidence to support the idea that the Dinosaur were in either long-term or short-term decline prior to the K-Pg extinction event.

Picture Credit: Zhao Chuang

Urging Caution

The researchers  did urge caution when it came to interpreting the results of the models stating that they may be too simplified and therefore not able to reflect the complexities of the underlying data.  To help confirm the state of dinosaur populations prior to the K-Pg extinction event the research team concluded that the collection of more dinosaur occurrence data would be needed to test these ideas and to validate any proposed hypothesis.

The scientific paper: “Dinosaur diversification rates were not in decline prior to the K-Pg boundary” by Joseph A. Bonsor, Paul M. Barret, Thomas J. Raven and Natalie Cooper published by Royal Society Open Science.

22 11, 2020

Update on the Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls

By | November 22nd, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls Delayed

We are sorry to announce that the arrival of the Rebor Fossil Studies set of 3 skulls has been once again delayed.  We are expecting them imminently but at the moment due to COVID-19, air freight has all but ceased and as virtually all goods are now being shipped there are extensive delays at ports.  With many parts of the world in lockdown, demand for mail order logistics has increased exponentially and this has increased the pressure on an already overloaded system.  We have been trying to get information about delivery to our warehouse, these updates are intermittent and we have not been able to receive the regular updates we wanted.

The Eagerly Anticipated Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls – Ceratosaurus, Carnotaurus and Yutyrannus

The Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls

The first batch of Rebor Oddities Fossil Skulls consists of a trio of skull replicas namely Yutyrannus, Ceratosaurus and Carnotaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We have put back the pre-order release date for these items to 12 noon (GMT) on the 1st December (2020).   We apologise for this and let me assure you that the team members at Everything Dinosaur are doing all they can to expediate the arrival of these eagerly anticipated models.

As soon as the items arrive, we will of course, be working extremely hard on your behalf to get these figures packed and despatched as rapidly as possible.

The Rebor Oddities Fossil Studies Carnotaurus sastrei, the Rebor Oddities Fossil Studies Ceratosaurus dentisculcatus and the Rebor Oddities Fossil Studies Yutyrannus huali figures have all been delayed.  This means that those customers who had taken advantage of our special offer and pre-ordered the set of three skull replicas together will have to be patient for a little while longer.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We apologise for the inconvenience.  Team members are doing all they can to help bring in these eagerly anticipated Rebor models into our warehouse, unfortunately with the COVID-19 pandemic and the enormous problems with logistics at the moment, delays are inevitable.  However, we have successfully been able to bring in shipments of other prehistoric animal figures, so we are confident that this matter will be resolved soon.”

To view the Rebor range of prehistoric animal and fantasy figures: Rebor Dinosaurs, Science Fiction and Prehistoric Animal Figures.

21 11, 2020

The Papo Megaloceros Model

By | November 21st, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases, Product Reviews|0 Comments

The Magnificent Papo Megaloceros Model

The magnificent Papo Megaloceros model is now in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  This year (2020), has been exceptionally challenging for many companies due to the COVID-19 global pandemic.  Factory production has been severely affected and logistic operations, so reliable under normal conditions have been under severe strain.  As a result, team members at Everything Dinosaur have found themselves announcing new for 2021 figures, when some of the new for 2020 models had yet to arrive.  Take for example, the Papo Megaloceros, it had been originally scheduled to come out in May, but it has been worth the wait.

The Magnificent Papo Megaloceros Model

The Papo Megaloceros Model

Papo Megaloceros model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Papo Megaloceros

Although this giant deer is often referred to as the “Irish Elk”, this most impressive member of the Cervidae, was not restricted to Ireland.  The “Emerald Isle” marked the western edge of its distribution, during the Pleistocene Epoch and into the Holocene these large herbivores could be found as far east as Siberia.  Megaloceros is not closely related to the elk family either, genetic studies have revealed that the Megaloceros genus is related to the Fallow deer (Dama dama).  The term “Irish Elk” seems to have become popularised from the 18th century onwards.  Numerous specimens found in peat bogs close to Dublin (Ireland), provided museums and private collectors in Europe with a wealth of material to use in displays and the term seems to have originated as a result of these remains being widely seen by the Victorian public.

The Papo Megaloceros Model

Papo Megaloceros model.

The new for 2020 Papo Megaloceros figure is looking very regal.  Many specimens were mounted in museums or in large country houses and this helped popularise the term “Irish Elk”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Model Measurements

The Papo Megaloceros figure is around 13 centimetres tall, with a shoulder height of 6 cm.  Those most impressive antlers have a span of over 11 centimetres.  Based on a 2.7 metre long adult animal, Everything Dinosaur team members estimate that this figure is in approximately 1/18th scale, so the Papo Megaloceros model will work well in dioramas using other prehistoric mammal models that are in 1/20th scale.

The huge antlers were shed and regrown by the bucks each year.  They may look extremely cumbersome, but given the size of the animal these palmate antlers are actually in proportion.

Papo Megaloceros Highlighting the Antlers

Papo Megaloceros model.

The Papo Megaloceros figure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

As with the majority of the prehistoric animal models and figures that they supply, Everything Dinosaur will be providing a free Megaloceros fact sheet with this new Papo replica.

The Beautifully Painted Megaloceros Model from Papo

New for 2020 Papo Megaloceros model.

The beautifully painted Papo Megaloceros model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the new for 2020 Papo Megaloceros and the rest of the Papo prehistoric animal models and figures available from Everything Dinosaur: Papo Prehistoric Animals.

20 11, 2020

PNSO to Introduce a Sauropelta Model

By | November 20th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

PNSO to Introduce a Sauropelta Model

The talented design team at PNSO are to add a replica of the armoured dinosaur called Sauropelta to their model range.  Say hello to Isaac the Sauropelta, yet another fantastic addition to the mid-size model range offered by this exciting figure and replica manufacturer.

PNSO Isaac the Sauropelta Dinosaur Model

PNSO Isaac the Sauropelta.

PNSO are to introduce a replica of the Early Cretaceous nodosaurid Sauropelta. Say hello to Isaac the Sauropelta.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Sauropelta Dinosaur Model

Details regarding this new dinosaur model are at a premium for the moment, but this figure is just the latest in a long line of compelling new prehistoric animal model announcements made by the company.  Everything Dinosaur has announced seven new figures this autumn, the first, Gaoyuan the Microraptor, is due to be in stock in just a few days. PNSO are to add a replica of the bizarre, Chinese marine reptile Atopodentatus to their portfolio and several new dinosaurs have been announced as well – Pachyrhinosaurus, Corythosaurus, Borealopelta, Lambeosaurus, Spinosaurus and Tuojiangosaurus.

Coming into Stock at Everything Dinosaur – Gaoyuan the Microraptor

PNSO Microraptor model.

The packaging for the new for 2020 PNSO Gaoyuan Microraptor dinosaur model.  The model will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in just a few days (as of November 20th 2020).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Isaac the Sauropelta

Sauropelta (S. edwardsorum), is thought to have been an early member of the Nodosauridae family.  The fossils of this heavily-built herbivore come from the Little Sheep Mudstone Member of the famous Cloverly Formation, this strata represents the middle section of this Early Cretaceous formation, the bedding planes associated with Sauropelta edwardsorum fossils are believed to have been deposited approximately 108 million years ago (Albian faunal stage of the Cretaceous).

Sauropelta co-existed with a number of theropod dinosaurs including the allosauroid Acrocanthosaurus as well as the large dromaeosaurid Deinonychus.  The armour, including huge defensive spikes, so exquisitely replicated in the new PNSO model would have helped to defend this slow-moving quadruped from attacks from these predators.

A Close-up View of the Head of the New PNSO Sauropelta Figure

A close-up view of the Sauropelta from PNSO.

A close-up view of the armoured head of Sauropelta, complete with an array of formidable defensive spikes.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It’s great to see a replica of this American nodosaurid added to the extensive PNSO dinosaur model range.  The company has announced a number of new armoured model introductions recently, including a model of Borealopelta and a replica of the Chinese stegosaur Tuojiangosaurus.  They are all so good it is difficult to pick out a favourite.”

The PNSO Sauropelta dinosaur model is likely to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in early 2021.   The model measures 17.3 cm in length.

To view the range of PNSO prehistoric animal models and figures available from Everything Dinosaur: PNSO Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals.

20 11, 2020

New CollectA Models 2021 (Part 3)

By | November 20th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

New CollectA Models 2021 (Part 3)

Everything Dinosaur in collaboration with CollectA announce further additions to the CollectA range of prehistoric animal models for 2021.  Today, we highlight the introduction of an Age of Dinosaurs Elasmosaurus marine reptile model, along with a contemporary of this elasmosaurid, a 1:40 scale replica of the fearsome prehistoric fish Xiphactinus.  Furthermore, a third set of mini dinosaur and prehistoric animal models will be added to the CollectA portfolio.

  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Elasmosaurus – a Late Cretaceous marine reptile.
  • CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus – a Late Cretaceous, predatory fish which was geographically widespread.
  • The CollectA box of mini dinosaurs (set 3) – contains 10 mini prehistoric animal models.

The CollectA Elasmosaurus, the 1:40 scale Xiphactinus and the CollectA mini prehistoric animal set will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around the middle of 2021.

The New for 2021 CollectA Elasmosaurus Marine Reptile Model

CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus model.

CollectA Elasmosaurus marine reptile model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Elasmosaurus

The CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus joins a growing number of marine reptile figures under the CollectA brand.  For example, in 2017 a model of the ichthyosaur Excalibosaurus was added to the range along with a 1:40 scale CollectA Deluxe Kronosaurus.  The famous American palaeontologist Edward Drinker Cope named and described Elasmosaurus in 1869, he based his study on fossils that had been discovered in Wyoming.  One of the larger members of the Plesiosauria, this marine reptile reached a length of around 14 metres and it is estimated to have weighed 2,000 kilograms when fully grown.

The CollectA model depicts Elasmosaurus in the act of turning to attack its prey, with its mouth open ready to grab an unsuspecting fish.

On the subject of fish, the next CollectA figure we discuss is a replica of a monstrous predatory fish with a reputation for being particularly aggressive.

The New for 2021 CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Xiphactinus Model

CollectA Deluxe Xiphactinus model.

The CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus prehistoric fish model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe Xiphactinus

A swift and powerful hunter, a number of species have been described from Cretaceous-aged deposits of North America, Europe and Australia.  Xiphactinus (pronounced Zee-fak-tin-us), swallowed its victims whole.  It had a varied diet, mostly fish and occasionally seabirds such as Hesperornis.  Its reputation for being particularly aggressive is well-founded, a Canadian specimen was recently discovered with the remains of a mosasaur flipper trapped in its jaws.   The aggressive nature of this bony fish sometimes was its undoing.  A famous fossil specimen collected by George F. Sternberg and on display at the Sternberg Museum of Natural History (Kansas, USA) shows a 4-metre-long Xiphactinus with a near perfect specimen of a ichthyodectid Gillicus arcuatus located in the stomach cavity.  It is likely that during the swallowing of the 1.8-metre-long Gillicus, the Xiphactinus was fatally injured.

A Famous Fossil of a Fish within a Fish

Xiphactinus with its last meal preserved inside it.

A fossil fish within a fish.  A famous fossil specimen – a four-metre-long Xiphactinus audax that died shortly after swallowing a Gillicus arcuatus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

With a model length of a fraction over 16 cm, the 1/40th scale rating for this figure is around the right ballpark.  Fans of Everything Dinosaur on Facebook will recall that a poll was posted earlier this year asking for views and opinions about the prospects of a Xiphactinus model being produced.  The overwhelmingly positive response received encouraged the design team at CollectA to bring out a Xiphactinus figure.

CollectA Set of Mini Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models (Set 3)

The third new item Everything Dinosaur announces today is a third set of CollectA dinosaur and prehistoric animal models.   These sets have proved to be very popular with dinosaur fans and model collectors, the mini models measure around six to ten centimetres in length and this new set features eight dinosaurs along with a pterosaur and a miniature marine reptile model.

The CollectA Mini Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models Set 3

CollectA mini dinosaurs and prehistoric animals set 3.

The CollectA mini dinosaurs and prehistoric animals set 3.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

This CollectA mini dinosaurs and prehistoric animals set features replicas of:

Dinosaurs – Alamosaurus, Argentinosaurus, Iguanodon, Mapusaurus, Mercuriceratops, Oviraptor, Therizinosaurus and Utahraptor.

Pterosaurs – Guidraco

Marine Reptiles – Pliosaurus (the replica that features in the CollectA mini prehistoric marine animals set)

Model Measurements

  • CollectA Age of Dinosaurs Popular Elasmosaurus – length 24 cm, width across the flippers 8 cm.
  • CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Xiphactinus – length 16.2 cm with a height of around 5.6 cm.
  • CollectA Mini Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Set 3 – average model size ranges between 6 cm and 10 cm approximately.

All three of these items will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around the middle of 2021.

To see the existing range of CollectA Deluxe models: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models.

CollectA models and figures: CollectA Prehistoric Life Models and Figures.

For our blog post on the first of the new for 2021 CollectA models to be announced: New CollectA Models for 2021 (Part 1).

For our blog post on the second batch of new CollectA figures: New CollectA Models (Part 2).

19 11, 2020

Safari Ltd Announce New Models for 2021

By | November 19th, 2020|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|2 Comments

Safari Ltd Announce New Prehistoric Animal Models for 2021

Safari Ltd have officially announced their new range of prehistoric animal figures for 2021.  The company will be adding models of Daspletosaurus, Baryonyx and a Spinosaurus to their Wild Safari Prehistoric World range and they have extended their Mythical Realms brand by including two armoured dinosaur figures – T. rex and Triceratops.  In 2020, Safari Ltd introduced a total of nine new figures into their Wild Safari Prehistoric World range.  There may be fewer models coming out in 2021, but given the huge difficulties caused by the global pandemic, plus the re-location of the company, Everything Dinosaur would like to pay tribute to all the dedicated and hard-working people at Safari Ltd who have made the introduction of new models possible.

All the models we announce today are scheduled to be in stock in January 2021.

The New Daspletosaurus Dinosaur Model (New for 2021)

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus dinosaur model.

The new for 2021 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus

This striking figure with its green and yellow markings demonstrating the biological concept of counter-shading represents a new tyrannosaurid genus added to the Safari Ltd product portfolio.  It follows on from the tyrannosaurid Qianzhousaurus that was introduced by Safari Ltd this year.

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx Dinosaur Model

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx dinosaur model.

The new for 2021 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The first Baryonyx model produced by Safari Ltd was under the Carnegie range, this figure came out in 1998, but was retired when this brand was withdrawn in 2014.    This new figure will join Suchomimus and Spinosaurus as representatives of the Spinosauridae within the Wild Safari Prehistoric World portfolio.

On the subject of Spinosaurus…

The Colourful New for 2021 Spinosaurus Model

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Spinosaurus dinosaur model.

The 2021 Wild Safari Prehistoric World Spinosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

There will also be a model of a Spinosaurus introduced next year (2021), this figure depicts this iconic dinosaur walking on land, as opposed to the swimming figure that was introduced in 2019.

Not Quite Armoured Dinosaurs

Talk to a palaeontologist about an armoured dinosaur and visions of nodosaurids, polacanthids, stegosaurs and ankylosaurids are conjured up.  However, in 2021 Safari Ltd will be adding a couple of colourful characters to their Mythical Realms range.  Two dinosaurs wearing silver armour will be added.  A T. rex complete with a helmet and an armoured Triceratops dinosaur model.

The Armoured Tyrannosaurus rex Dinosaur Model (Mythical Realms)

Mythical Realms T. rex dinosaur model.

Safari Ltd have extended their Mythical Realms line by adding an armoured T. rex dinosaur model to this range.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Triceratops Sporting a Coat of Armour

Mythical Realms Triceratops model.

The Mythical Realms Triceratops dinosaur model.  Is that a club we can see on your tail?

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“These armoured dinosaurs are very imaginative.  They remind team members of some of the dinosaurs that feature in the Dinotopia series of fantasy novels by author and illustrator James Gurney.  These figures will make an exciting addition to the range of Safari Ltd models that we supply.”

All these figures are expected to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around January 2021.

Model Measurements

We know how important model dimensions are to collectors and fans of dinosaurs who like to try to provide a scale for their figures, so here are those important measurements.

  • Wild Safari Prehistoric World Daspletosaurus – length 22.5 cm approximately with a height of around 11.5 cm.
  • Wild Safari Prehistoric World Baryonyx – length 22.9 cm approximately with a height of 8.9 cm.
  • Wild Safari Prehistoric World Spinosaurus – length 22.9 cm with the height of the sail around 7.6 cm.
  • Mythical Realms Armoured T. rex – length 15.2 cm approximately, height approximately 10 cm.
  • Mythical Realms Armoured Triceratops – length 20.3 cm, height of around 8.9 cm.

All these figures are expected to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur around January 2021.

To view the current range of Safari Ltd figures available from Everything Dinosaur: Safari Ltd Models and Figures.

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