In the Northern Hemisphere it might be cold and dark as we approach the depths of winter, but here are some pictures of the colourful Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops to brighten your day. The bright and cheery Wendiceratops model (W. pinhornensis), was part of the second wave of horned dinosaurs to be introduced in this series. The Beasts of the Mesozoic ceratopsians are all very colourful, the Wendiceratops, a replica of a Late Cretaceous, Canadian centrosaurine is one of the most spectacular and flamboyant models in the entire range.

Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops dinosaur model
The colourful Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops pinhornensis articulated dinosaur model (oblique anterior view).

Colourful Packaging Too

Even the box the figure comes in is beautifully presented with stunning artwork and the packaging incorporates some facts about this large, horned dinosaur that was scientifically described in 2015 (Evans and Ryan).

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops box.
The Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops pinhornensis product packaging. The Beasts of the Mesozoic range of articulated dinosaur models has quickly earned a deserved reputation for its colourful and beautiful box art.

Wendiceratops pinhornensis Model Measurements

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops pinhornensis is a fantastic 1:18 scale articulated model. Palaeontologist and author Gregory S. Paul estimates that this centrosaurine measured around 4.5 metres in length and weighed 1,500 kilograms. The Everything Dinosaur fact sheet on this dinosaur, which is sent out with sales of the figure concurs.

The model itself measures a generous 30.5 cm long, from the end of the tail to the tip of the dinosaur’s broad snout.

Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops model measurements.
The Beasts of the Mesozoic Wendiceratops model measures 30.5 cm long from nose to tail.

Described as a basal member of the Centrosaurinae subfamily, Wendiceratops roamed Alberta approximately 79 million years ago. Its fossils come from the Oldman Formation and a taxonomic assessment places Wendiceratops as a sister taxon to the geologically younger Sinoceratops (S. zhuchengensis) from the Shandong Province of eastern China.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s article from 2015 about the discovery of Wendiceratops: Wendiceratops from Southern Alberta.

To view the range of Beasts of the Mesozoic dinosaur models available from Everything Dinosaur: Beasts of the Mesozoic Models and Figures.

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