Our thanks to Caldey who sent into Everything Dinosaur another drawing of a horned dinosaur. This time Caldey has chosen to illustrate a centrosaurine, the spectacular Diabloceratops (D. eatoni), a plant-eater that roamed Utah during the Campanian faunal stage of the Late Cretaceous.

With its huge pair of horns extending beyond the headshield and its large, brow horns, Diabloceratops (devil horned face), was one very impressive-looking dinosaur.

A Diabloceratops eatoni drawing by Caldey
The very colourful horned dinosaur by talented young artist Caldey. We think that Caldey drew inspiration from the Beasts of the Mesozoic Diabloceratops (D. eatoni) replica.

Inspired by a Beasts of the Mesozoic Ceratopsian

Team members at Everything Dinosaur think that this colourful ceratopsian illustration was inspired by the colour scheme on the Beasts of the Mesozoic articulated Diabloceratops figure.

Beasts of the Mesozoic Diabloceratops
The Beasts of the Mesozoic articulated Diabloceratops eatoni model. This replica of a centrosaurine was part of the first wave of ceratopsian figures to be produced in the Beasts of the Mesozoic range.

A Diabloceratops Duo

This Diabloceratops illustration we received this week is not the first Diabloceratops drawing from Caldey that we have been sent. In 2019, Schleich introduced a Diabloceratops figure, this model proved to be extremely popular and shortly after its introduction Caldey sent into Everything Dinosaur her illustration of the Schleich model.

Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur drawing.
The Schleich Diabloceratops inspired Caldey to illustrate this dinosaur back in 2019.
Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.
A close-up view of the front end (anterior portion) of the Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model. This horned dinosaur model, introduced in 2019 inspired Caldey to produce her first illustration of Diabloceratops that was sent to Everything Dinosaur.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Some of the spectacular horned dinosaurs that have been recently named and described have proved very popular with palaeoartists of all ages. Our thanks to Caldey for sending into us her Diabloceratops drawing. Her artwork is greatly appreciated”.

Share This!Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0