All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
//February
26 02, 2020

Last Chance to Enter the Everything Dinosaur Giveaway

By | February 26th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Fantastic Mojo Fun Models Giveaway – Last Chance to Enter

Mojo Fun Giveaway Competition Ends on 28th February

There are just a couple of days left for blog readers, dinosaur fans and customers of Everything Dinosaur to enter our marvellous Mojo Fun dinosaur model giveaway.  The competition closes at midnight on Friday 28th February (2020).

Everything Dinosaur got together with those clever, talented people at Mojo Fun and to celebrate the introduction of the new for 2020 Mojo Fun dinosaur models, Everything Dinosaur is giving away two very special Mandschurosaurus replicas.

One of the production models from China and there is a second figure in a different colour scheme.  One model that collectors will find in the new Mojo Fun 2020 catalogue plus a second, additional Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus.

Two Mojo Fun Dinosaur Models to Win in Everything Dinosaur’s Great Giveaway

Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus dinosaur models.

Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus dinosaur model giveaway contest.  Two Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus dinosaur models to give away- thanks to  Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Win a pair of marvellous Mandschurosaurus models in Everything Dinosaur’s contest.

All entrants have to do is “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s FACEBOOK page, comment on the “Mojo Fun Competition” picture, perhaps you could tell us your favourite prehistoric animal, dinosaur movie or propose names for these two rare dinosaur figures and we will enter you into our free prize draw.

Everything Dinosaur on FACEBOOK: “LIKE” our Facebook page and enter the competition!

A team member will draw the winner at random and the “Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus” contest ends on midnight Friday 28th February.  We wish all the entrants the very best of luck, we hope you win these two highly sought after dinosaur figures.

The new for 2020 Mojo Fun Prehistoric Life prehistoric animal models are due in stock at Everything Dinosaur very soon, to view the Mojo Fun range: Mojo Fun Prehistoric and Extinct Animals.

Win Two Very Special Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus Models

Win the Pair of Special Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus Dinosaur Replicas

Two Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus models to win in Everything Dinosaur's giveaway.

Win two special Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus dinosaur models.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The “Everything Dinosaur Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus” Contest Terms and Conditions

Automated entries are not permitted and will be excluded from the draw.

Only one entry per person.

The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative will be offered.

The “Everything Dinosaur Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus” competition runs until midnight Friday 28th February 2020.

Winner will be notified by private message on Facebook.

Prize includes postage and packing.

This giveaway is in no way sponsored, endorsed, administered by or associated with Facebook.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges a complete release of Facebook by each entrant/participant.

For full terms and conditions contact: Contact Everything Dinosaur

Win with Everything Dinosaur!

Win a Wonderful Pair of Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus Dinosaur Models with Everything Dinosaur

Win a pair of dinosaur models.

Win a pair of Mojo Fun Mandschurosaurus dinosaur models thanks to Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Remember the competition closes at midnight on the 28th February 2020.

To visit Everything Dinosaur’s website: Everything Dinosaur.

25 02, 2020

CollectA Deluxe Protoceratops Video Preview

By | February 25th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

CollectA Deluxe Protoceratops Video Preview

Everything Dinosaur is expecting to take delivery of the first batch of the new for 2020 CollectA prehistoric animal models in just a few weeks.  One of the new figures will be the 1:6 scale replica of Protoceratops (P. andrewsi).  To help dinosaur fans and model collectors to appreciate the superb detailing on this replica, we have made a short sixty second preview video.  This is the first video that utilises our new turntable, this is really helpful when it comes to displaying dinosaur models and figures.

Previewing Protoceratops – The CollectA Deluxe Protoceratops Dinosaur Model

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA 1:6 Scale Protoceratops Model

The CollectA Protoceratops measures around 24 cm in length and those bristles on the tail stand approximately 11 cm high.  Everything Dinosaur has invested in a small turntable so that viewers of the company’s videos can get a really good look at prehistoric animal models and replicas.  In this short video preview, the detail on the Protoceratops can be clearly seen, with features such as the articulated lower jaw and cloaca visible.

Coming into Stock at Everything Dinosaur Soon (Quarter 1 2020)

CollectA Deluxe Protoceratops model.

The CollectA Deluxe 1:6 scale Protoceratops dinosaur model (P. andrewsi).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“The turntable permits us to display a model in such a way that viewers can get a really good look at the figure.  We can operate the turntable in either a clockwise or an anti-clockwise direction, so our YouTube channel subscribers have a 360˚ view of the prehistoric animal on display.  We intend to post up more videos providing previews of up and coming models in the future, after all, we have a lot of new dinosaurs coming into stock in the next two months or so.”

A Close-up View of the CollectA Deluxe Protoceratops Showing the Beautifully Detailed Head and the Articulated Lower Jaw

The CollectA Protoceratops dinosaur model has an articulated jaw.

A close-up view of the CollectA 1:6 scale Protoceratops model showing the articulated jaw.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The YouTube channel of Everything Dinosaur is a great resource for dinosaur fans and prehistoric animal model collectors.  The channel contains over 150 videos dedicated to dinosaurs and other forms of prehistoric life, with model reviews, collecting tips and previews of forthcoming replicas.

You can find the Everything Dinosaur YouTube channel here: Everything Dinosaur on YouTube.  We recommend that blog readers subscribe to Everything Dinosaur on YouTube.

Everything Dinosaur stocks a huge range of prehistoric animals including a large number of scale models in the CollectA Deluxe series.

To purchase CollectA Deluxe models and figures: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Life.

24 02, 2020

Everything Dinosaur will be Stocking the Wild Past Protoceratops Model

By | February 24th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur will be Stocking the Wild Past Protoceratops Dinosaur Model

Everything Dinosaur will be stocking the Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model, the first dinosaur figure to be introduced in this exciting range.  Stock is due to arrive at Everything Dinosaur’s warehouse in just a couple of weeks or so and a reserve list for this limited production run model has now been opened.

Everything Dinosaur will be Stocking the New for 2020 Wild Past Protoceratops Dinosaur Model

Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model.

The new for 2020 Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model will be stocked by Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A New 1:35 Scale Replica of Protoceratops andrewsi

The carefully crafted Protoceratops replica is the first model to be introduced in the Wild Past range, this is quite appropriate as the genus name translates from the Greek as “first horn face”.  Two species are placed within this genus, Protoceratops andrewsi, which was named and described in back in 1923 and the larger Protoceratops hellenikorhinus, known from the Bayan Mandahu Formation of Inner Mongolia (China), which was named and described in 2001.

Arguably, Protoceratops is one of the most important dinosaurs ever discovered.  Hundreds of fossil specimens have been found ranging in size from embryos to fully mature and elderly adults.  In some sites, Protoceratops andrewsi fossil material represents around three-quarters of all the vertebrate fossil material associated with that location.

The Wild Past Protoceratops Dinosaur Model

The Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model.

Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model what a “hand”some figure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

When American palaeontologists William King Gregory and Walter Granger (American Museum of Natural History, New York), produced the first scientific description (1923), they commented on the remarkable number of fossils found, including complete skulls representing small juveniles to large adults.  Some of these skulls depicting the growth stages of Protoceratops were put on display at the Museum and as far as Everything Dinosaur team members are aware, the exhibit is still there.

The Wild Past Protoceratops and Everything Dinosaur

The Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model available from Everything Dinosaur.

Everything Dinosaur will be stocking the new for 2020 Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Wild Past Protoceratops Complete with a Nest of Dinosaur Eggs

Wild Past Protoceratops dinosaur model complete with a nest of dinosaur eggs.

Wild Past Protoceratops model with nest.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Small Production Run

It is official, Everything Dinosaur will be stocking the new Protoceratops in the Wild Past range.  The production run for this exciting new replica, complete with a nest of dinosaur eggs, is small, but stock will be available from Everything Dinosaur in just a couple of weeks (as of end February 2020).

The Wild Past Protoceratops will cost £11.99 including tax (if applicable) plus P+P.

To join our priority reserve list for this fantastic figure: Email Everything Dinosaur to Reserve the Wild Past Protoceratops.

23 02, 2020

Tiny Fossil From Germany Lifts Lid on the Lepidosauromorphs

By | February 23rd, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Tiny Fossil Sheds Light on Reptile Diversification in the Triassic

Scientists writing in the on-line, open access journal “Scientific Reports”, have published details of a remarkable fossil discovery from a limestone quarry located close to the town of Vellberg in Baden-Württemberg (Germany).  The tiny fossilised remains of juvenile lizard-like reptile are helping palaeontologists to better understand the evolution of modern-day lizards and snakes as well as their taxonomic relationship with a “living fossil” – the tuatara of New Zealand.

The partially articulated fossil, including a beautifully preserved skull, is approximately 240 million-years-old (Middle Triassic – Ladinian faunal stage).  The entire specimen is around ten centimetres long and it has been named Vellbergia bartholomaei and classified as a stem-lepidosauromorph.

The Tiny Preserved Skull of Vellbergia bartholomaei

Vellbergia bartholomaei skull fossil and line drawing.

Vellbergia bartholomaei – photograph of fossil skull and interpretative line drawing.  The holotype material, note scale bar equals 5 mm approximately.

Picture Credit: Scientific Reports

A Decisive Contribution to a Better Understanding of the Evolution of the Reptilia

The Middle Triassic represents a period in Earth’s history where tetrapod faunas were recovering from the global devastation caused by the end Permian extinction event.  However, the paucity of terrestrial vertebrate fossils has limited how much scientists can learn about how the fauna changed and developed during this time, prior to the emergence and eventual dominance of the Dinosauria.  Researchers from the Natural History Museum Stuttgart in collaboration with a colleague from Harvard University (USA), noted that the skeleton of V. bartholomaei showed anatomical traits that link it to both the Order Squamata (lizards and snakes) and the Rhynchocephalia, ancient lizard-like reptiles that includes only one living species, the tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus).

Co-author of the Scientific Paper Dr. Rainer Schoch Holding the Tiny Specimen of Vellbergia bartholomaei

Dr. Rainer Schoch (Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart).

Dr. Rainer Schoch (Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart), holding the tiny V. bartholomaei fossil.  The skull of the unrelated but contemporary archosaur Batrachotomus can be seen on the right.

Picture Credit: Stuttgart Natural History Museum (Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart)

Vellbergia bartholomaei

Vellbergia is named after the nearby town, whilst the species name honours Alfred Bartholomä of Neuenstein, who was responsible for many of the significant fossil finds associated with rocks of the Middle Triassic age from Germany.  The new species described here falls into the smallest size cluster so far collected from the Vellberg location, and likely represents the first juvenile individual from the site.  This new taxon depicts a mosaic of features that are generally observed in both early evolving rhynchocephalians and squamates, providing a link between the two and suggesting stem-lepidosauromorphs may have survived up to the Middle Triassic.

The mudstones associated with the limestone quarry have proved to be a particularly successful hunting ground for vertebrate palaeontologists.  In 2015, Everything Dinosaur reported upon another discovery made by Dr. Rainer Schoch and his colleagues, the finding of the fossilised remains that provided a fresh insight into the origins of modern turtles (Chelonia).

To read about this fossil discovery: Pappochelys rosinae The Grandfather of all Tortoises and Turtles.

The scientific paper: “A tiny new Middle Triassic stem-lepidosauromorph from Germany: implications for the early evolution of lepidosauromorphs and the Vellberg fauna” by Gabriela Sobral, Tiago R. Simões and Rainer R. Schoch published in Scientific Reports.

22 02, 2020

Papo Prehistoric Animal Models Shine at Toy Fair

By | February 22nd, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Papo Prehistoric Animal Models Shine at Toy Fair

An eagle-eyed Everything Dinosaur team member spotted a photograph showcasing some of the Papo prehistoric animal models at the recent Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse in Germany.  The Toy Fair organisers had taken pictures of various product displays at the exhibition over the course of a few days and some of the Papo prehistoric animals had obviously caught the eye of the trade show photographer.

Papo Prehistoric Animal Models are Showcased at the Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse 2020

Papo models are showcased at the 2020 Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse.

Papo models are showcased at the 2020 Nuremberg Toy Fair.  Four Papo models are featured can you name them all?

Picture Credit: Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse/Everything Dinosaur

The photograph shows four prehistoric animals in close proximity to the Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse logo.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“With thousands of Papo models in our warehouse, our team members get to see Papo prehistoric animal models every day.  However, for a photographer at a huge exhibition such as the Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse, which is, we believe to be the largest toy fair in Europe, they may not have been all that aware of the Papo range.  Having come across the Papo trade stand, the photogenic qualities of the models and figures, attracted a lot of attention and hence the resulting photograph came about.”

The four Papo figures certainly look impressive and whilst at the event, Everything Dinosaur took the opportunity to take some photographs of their own, focusing on the new for 2020 Papo prehistoric animal models such as the magnificent Megaloceros figure.

The Papo Megaloceros Model on Display at the Trade Fair (Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse)

Spotted a Papo Megaloceros model on display.

A pre-production Papo Megaloceros model on display at the Nuremberg Spielwarenmesse 2020.  The Megaloceros is one of six new Papo prehistoric animals to be introduced later this year – Chilesaurus, Stygimoloch, Giganotosaurus, new colour variant feathered Velociraptor (seen far right of the photograph) and a new colour variant Papo Parasaurolophus (background).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of Papo dinosaurs and prehistoric animal models available from Everything Dinosaur: Papo Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals.

21 02, 2020

CT Scanning an Eagle Lizard

By | February 21st, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

CT Scans Reveal the Armour of Aetosaurs

A student from Bristol University has carried out a study into the armour on the tail of an aetosaur.   The study, published in the Scottish Journal of Geology, has provided fresh information on how these large, lumbering herbivores kept themselves safe from ancient predators.  Emily Keeble, a recent graduate from the palaeobiology programme at Bristol University carried out the study under the supervision of Professor Mike Benton (School of Earth Sciences).  CT (computerised tomography), scans were undertaken, the first time this scientific method has been employed to better understand how the armour of an aetosaur functioned.

A Model of a Typical Aetosaur.

Desmatosuchus model.

A model of an aetosaur (ruler provides scale).  Although these tetrapods looked formidable with their spikes and their body armour they were herbivores.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Late Triassic Archosaurs

Aetosaurs were heavily armoured, herbivorous archosaurs that were geographically widespread during the Middle and Late Triassic.  The term “aetosaur” is from the Greek and it means “eagle lizard”, when scientists first examined the skulls of these animals, their superficial resemblance to the skulls of eagles was remarked upon.  The fossil specimens used in this research were collected from a sandstone quarry near the town of Elgin in north-eastern Scotland.  They had been donated to the nearby Elgin Museum, where staff members Janet Trythall and Alison Wright were able to identify what they were and arrange for the scanning in Bristol.

Professor Benton explained:

“Aetosaurs were first identified from an Elgin specimen in 1844, but at that time people thought they had found a giant fish.  The first specimen showed a number of rectangular scales, arranged in a closely overlapping, regular pattern, and it was called Stagonolepis, meaning drop-shaped scale.”

Dorsal and Lateral Views of the Scottish Aetosaur Stagonolepis

The Scottish aetosaur Stagonolepis

The Scottish aetosaur Stagonolepis (A) dorsal and (B) lateral views.  Note scale bar = 1 metre.

Picture Credit: Bristol University (illustration by Jeffrey Martz after work by Alick Walker)

CT Scans Provide Details on Osteoderm Structure

The fossilised tail bones were subjected to high resolution CT scans, this permitted the researchers to see surface details and the texture of the bones and related armour plates.

Emily Keeble added:

“What had been identified as giant fish scales are actually armour plates, or osteoderms, made of plates of bone and embedded in the skin, just like in modern crocodiles.”

Two specimens were studied, both associated with caudal vertebra and possibly from the same animal, but they do not fit together.  Each fossil shows a complete circle of osteoderms around the tail, two above, two on each side, and two below.

Caudal Specimen of Stagonolepis robertsoni Used in the Fossil Study

Stagonolepis robertsoni fossil.

Stagonolepis robertsoni, ELGNM 2018.6.1 one of the aetosaur caudal vertebra specimens used in the study.  Scale bar = 1 cm.

Picture Credit: Bristol University

Regular Rows of Osteoderms

The researchers discovered that the rows of osteoderms were very regular and in life covered the entire body from the back of the small head, over the neck, down the back and along the tail.  Osteoderms also covered the flanks and underneath.  There were even small osteoderms over the fleshy parts of the arms and legs.

The Second Stagonolepis robertsoni Fossil Specimen Used in the Research

Aetosaur osteoderm study.

Stagonolepis robertsoni ELGNM 2018.6.2 showing internal impressions of the caudal osteoderms in articulation.  Note scale bar = 1 cm.

Picture Credit: Bristol University

This study suggests that the armour of these herbivores wrapped around them completely and would have made an effective defence against predators such as rauisuchians and ornithosuchids.

Emily Keeble added:

“Vertebrae of the tail are preserved inside the ring of osteoderms, and these show the specimens were only slightly squished during the preservation process.  We could also see how the osteoderms overlap like roof tiles, the osteoderm in front slightly overlapping the one behind.  They were linked with connective tissue so the armour overall was flexible, but tough and could probably protect the animal from the fierce predators of its day.”

A Colourised Image of Aetosaur Osteoderms and a Single Scale Shown in More Detail

 

Aetosaur osteoderms.

Reconstructed segment of the aetosaur tail armour and a single osteoderm in more detail.

Picture Credit: Emily Keeble (Bristol University)

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a press release from Bristol University in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “Three-dimensional tomographic study of dermal armour from the tail of the Triassic aetosaur Stagonolepis robertsoni” by E. Keeble and M. Benton published in the Scottish Journal of Geology.

20 02, 2020

Illustrating Canada’s Newest/Oldest Tyrannosaur

By | February 20th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Illustrating Thanatotheristes degrootorum

Our thanks to Caldey for sending into Everything Dinosaur a beautiful illustration of the recently described Canadian tyrannosaur Thanatotheristes degrootorum.  Caldey was inspired by the media coverage of this new theropod dinosaur, perhaps she even read our blog post about this large carnivore from the Foremost Formation of Alberta.  Described from fragmentary remains, the fossils of T. degrootorum represent the earliest known evidence of diagnostic tyrannosaurid material to have been discovered in Canada.  It roamed northern Laramidia around 80.1 to 79.5 million years ago, as such it is (for the moment at least), both Canada’s oldest and newest tyrannosaur.

The Illustration of Thanatotheristes degrootorum by Caldey

Thanatotheristes degrootorum illustration by Caldey.

Thanatotheristes degrootorum illustration by Caldey, a drawing of a newly described theropod dinosaur from Alberta (Canada).

Picture Credit: Caldey

Everything Dinosaur receives lots of illustrations of prehistoric animals.  Our team members view them all and we are grateful for everyone that we get sent to us.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s article on the newly described Thanatotheristes degrootorumCanada’s Newest and Oldest Tyrannosaurid Thanatotheristes degrootorum.

The “Reaper of Death”

Closely related to Daspletosaurus, Thanatotheristes, which means the “reaper of death” in Greek, has been placed within a newly erected tribe within the Tyrannosauridae family.  This tribe, named the Daspletosaurini consists of T. degrootorum, Daspletosaurus torosus along with Daspletosaurus horneri and an as yet not formally described tyrannosaurid from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta (specimen number FMNH PR308).

Our thanks to Caldey for sending into Everything Dinosaur her fantastic dinosaur drawing.

19 02, 2020

José Bonaparte – The Father of Palaeontology in Argentina (1928-2020)

By | February 19th, 2020|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Famous Figures, Main Page|0 Comments

José Bonaparte (1928-2020)

Today’s blog post is dedicated to José Bonaparte, one of the greatest palaeontologists of the 20th Century and regarded as the “Father of Argentinian Palaeontology”, who has passed away.  He died yesterday (18th February), at the age of 91.  Social media has been filled with tributes to this dedicated, passionate and influential scientist, who was such an inspiration to a whole generation of palaeontologists.

José Fernando Bonaparte (1928-2020)

José Bonaparte - the father of palaeontology in Argentina.

José Bonaparte (1928-2020).

Picture Credit: Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales “Bernardino Rivadavia”

El Padre de la Paleontología en la Argentina

Respected and admired by many professional palaeontologists, the self-taught José Bonaparte was regarded as a workaholic and a tough taskmaster, but perhaps, he more than anybody else is responsible for introducing the remarkable vertebrate fossils found in Argentina to the rest of the world.  Dinosaur palaeontologist Peter Dodson stated that “almost single-handedly he’s responsible for Argentina becoming the sixth country in the world in kinds of dinosaurs”.

His legacy will live on and his contribution will continue to be recognised, for example, last year alone there were something like ten new genera of non-avian dinosaurs described from fossil remains found in Argentina.

Bonaparte, who spent the majority of his career as head of the Vertebrate Palaeontology Division of the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales “Bernardino Rivadavia”, in Buenos Aires was responsible for, or at least played a significant role in the study of iconic dinosaurs – famous animals such as Carnotaurus, Amargasaurus, Abelisaurus, Argentinosaurus, Noasaurus and numerous others.  He made many other hugely important discoveries such as the finding of the first fossilised remains of Mesozoic South American mammals and he was amongst the first scientists to lead the “dinosaur revolution” inspired by Ostrom in the 1970’s.

Robert Bakker nicknamed Bonaparte the “Master of the Mesozoic” (Maestro del Mesozoico).  He was responsible for training a generation of palaeontologists, many of which are now regarded as leaders in the field – scientists such as Luis Chiappe, Rodolfo Coria, Agustín Martinelli, Fernando Novas, Jaime Powell, Guillermo Rougier, Leonardo Salgado, Sebastián Apesteguía and many others.

El Maestro del Mesozoico – José Bonaparte (1928-2020)

José Bonaparte "El Maestro del Mesozoico".

José Bonaparte (1928-2020) the “father of Argentinian palaeontology”

Picture Credit: Télam

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a media release from the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales “Bernardino Rivadavia” in the compilation of this article.

18 02, 2020

In Praise of a Polish Giant – Lisowicia bojani

By | February 18th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

CollectA and a Prehistoric Giant from Poland – Lisowicia bojani

To celebrate the production of the CollectA Deluxe 1:20 scale model of Lisowicia bojani, a prehistoric animal from Poland, Everything Dinosaur has prepared a special blog post in Polish for all our Polish customers and friends.

Those clever and talented people at CollectA have created the biggest dinosaur line in the world, but they don’t just make models of dinosaurs, there are lots of other prehistoric animals too and later on this year (mid 2020), Polish model collectors will be able to get their hands on their very own Polish prehistoric animal model.  A figure that represents one of the most important discoveries made in Europe by vertebrate palaeontologists this century.

CollectA will be introducing a 1:20 scale replica of Lisowicia bojani, a giant herbivore that roamed Silesia, southern Poland, more than 200 million years ago.

A Photograph of One of the Production Figures of the CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia bojani Model

CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia bojani.

The CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia bojani 1:20 scale model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Late Triassic Dicynodont

A clay pit (the Lipie Śląskie clay pit), close to the village of Lisowice, has provided scientists with thousands of fossil bones to study.  The fossils represent a wide variety of vertebrates including predatory dinosaurs, pterosaurs and large amphibians that once lived in a low-lying, wetland environment.  Polish scientists have played a prominent role in excavating the site and describing the fossil discoveries.  When giant limb bones were unearthed, researchers thought that they had found the remains of a long-necked, plant-eating dinosaur (sauropod), but it was soon realised that these colossal and robust bones came from an enormous dicynodont (die-sigh-no-dont), an animal more closely related to us (Homo sapiens), than to any dinosaur!

The CollectA Deluxe 1:20 Scale Lisowicia bojani Model

Lisowicia bojani model (CollectA Deluxe).

CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia bojani model.  Like most dicynodonts, Lisowicia was toothless and it had a large beak for cropping vegetation.  The articulated jaw on the CollectA Deluxe model helps to show these features.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Defining Dicynodonts

Dicynodonts are a group of extinct quadrupeds which are distantly related to modern mammals.  They first evolved in the Permian geological period, more than 70 different genera have been named and described.  Although the strata in which the fossils of Lisowicia were found have proved very difficult to date, they could be at least 10 million years younger than any previously described dicynodont fossil material known to science.

Not only was Lisowicia one of the last dicynodonts to have roamed our planet, it was by far the biggest.  Scientists have estimated that Lisowicia measured 4.5 metres long and had a hip height in excess of 2 metres.  Lisowicia is believed to have been at least 40% bigger than any other known dicynodont.  Intriguingly, this elephant-sized animal was the largest animal known from the Late Triassic of Poland, and to date, no fossils of big, plant-eating dinosaurs have been found in this part of Europe, although their fossils have been found in similarly aged rocks elsewhere.

A Geological Ruler Helps to Show the Size of the CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia Model

The CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia bojani model.

The ruler helps to show the size of the CollectA Lisowicia model.  The CollectA Deluxe Lisowicia measures just under 20 cm long.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Formally named and described in 2018, the genus name honours the Polish village of Lisowice, whilst the species name honours the German-born comparative anatomist Ludwig Heinrich Bojanus.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It is great to have a model of a Polish prehistoric animal such as Lisowicia bojani added to the CollectA Deluxe model range.  We are sure that collectors in Poland are going to be delighted with this new replica, the beautiful and very detailed model depicts an extinct, giant dicynodont that is known only from Poland.  It is a model of an animal that was a large as an elephant, a long extinct creature that has helped palaeontologists to better understand Late Triassic ecosystems of Europe.”

To view the range of CollectA Deluxe prehistoric animals and dinosaurs available from Everything Dinosaur: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Life.

17 02, 2020

New Papo Prehistoric Animal Model Measurements (Part 2)

By | February 17th, 2020|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

New Papo Prehistoric Animal Model Measurements (Part 2)

Everything Dinosaur recently published the official measurements for two of the brand new prehistoric animal models from Papo.  Today, we conclude our blog posts in relation to the measurement of the brand new Papo figures and our comments on scaling these figures by publishing the official measurements for the Papo Stygimoloch dinosaur model and the Papo Megaloceros.

Whilst Papo may not produce scale models of prehistoric animals, we know how keen dinosaur fans and model collectors are for any guidance as to the approximate scale of a replica.  To this end we have put together this short blog posts that concludes our foray into this area.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s earlier post about the Papo Chilesaurus and the Papo Giganotosaurus dinosaur models: New Papo Prehistoric Animal Model Measurements (Part 1).

The Official Model Measurements for the New Papo Stygimoloch Dinosaur Model

Official measurements for the new for 2020 Papo Stygimoloch dinosaur model.

The official measurements for the new for 2020 Papo Stygimoloch dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Papo Stygimoloch – Tale of the Tape

Everything Dinosaur has been informed that this new model stands around eight centimetres tall and that it is approximately seven centimetres in length.  Calculating the scale for this pachycephalosaur (bone-headed) dinosaur is a little tricky, as most palaeontologists believe the fossils ascribed to Stygimoloch (S. spirifer), actually represent, juvenile, immature specimens of Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis.

Dracorex (D. hogwartsia) and Stygimoloch (S. spirifer) are regarded as “nomina dubia”, that is to say, that the validity of both these two genera are now in doubt.

The reasons for the uncertainty of the Dracorex and Stygimoloch taxa can be summarised as follows:

  • In 2007, at the annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (SVP), palaeontologist John R. Horner (Jack Horner), presented evidence that the holotype Dracorex specimen might represent Stygimoloch.  He further proposed that Dracorex and Stygimoloch represented juvenile or possible female P. wyomingensis specimens.
  • In 2009, Horner in collaboration with Mark Goodwin, published further evidence suggesting that the cranial spikes and bumps on the skulls of these three dinosaurs showed considerable variation but within a range expected for a single species.  In addition, they concluded that whilst P. wyomingensis was known from adult specimens, both Dracorex and Stygimoloch fossil material represent juveniles.  As all three “species” are known from the Hell Creek Formation, then all the pachycephalosaur fossils could be associated with a single genus.  As these types of dinosaurs grew and matured they lost their spikes and developed thick, dome-shaped skulls.
  •  More recently, other scientific papers have been published that conclude that the so-called “unique” characteristics of Stygimoloch and Dracorex are morphologically consistent traits that would be expected if a Pachycephalosaurus growth curve was plotted.

Calculating the Scale for the Papo Stygimoloch Model

If it is proposed that Stygimoloch represents a juvenile specimen of Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis, then what growth stage does this model represent?  If we assume that the Papo figure represents a half-grown animal, then we can speculate that the body length would be around two to three metres.  Based on these assumptions, a model that is seven centimetres long would be in scale 1:28.5 for a two-metre-long animal or approximately 1:42 scale for a three-metre-long animal.

One of the Prototype Production Models (Papo Stygimoloch)

Papo Stygimoloch model.

A view of one of the production prototypes of the Papo Stygimoloch dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Official Model Measurements for the Papo Megaloceros Model

Official measurements for the new for 2020 Papo Megaloceros prehistoric animal model.

The official measurements for the new for 2020 Papo Megaloceros prehistoric animal model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Papo Megaloceros Model – Tale of the Tape

The Papo Megaloceros model is the only non-dinosaur figure to be introduced by Papo in 2020.  The information received by Everything Dinosaur indicates that this figure will measure some 16 centimetres in length, stand around 6 cm high at the shoulders with an overall height of 13.5 cm.  When all the new Papo figures are in stock, Everything Dinosaur team members will carefully measure each model and publish the details in the “additional information” section of the relevant product pages.

If it is assumed that this figure represents an example of the largest species of Megaloceros (M. giganteus), then with the type species having an estimated body length of 3.2 metres this figure could be in 1:20 scale.

A Papo Megalosaurus Figure on Display

Spotted a Papo Megaloceros model on display.

A pre-production Papo Megaloceros model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Delays in Production due to the COVID-19 Outbreak

As Papo’s production is based in China, the company is currently experiencing difficulties scheduling manufacturing due to the continuing COVID-19 (Coronavirus) outbreak.  Everything Dinosaur will keep social media followers and our blog readers informed of developments and when more information becomes available regarding the availability of these models, we will publish it.

To see the range of Papo dinosaurs and prehistoric animal models in stock at Everything Dinosaur: Papo Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animal Models.

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