A Prehistoric Scene Featuring the Mojo Fun Triceratops Model (2019)

Our congratulations to those clever people at Mojo Fun for coming up with some fascinating prehistoric scenes to help promote the Mojo Fun model range featuring prehistoric and recently extinct animals.  The  prehistoric scene (below), features a pair of adult Triceratops (the Mojo Fun 2019 Triceratops model), facing off against each other.  Such intraspecific combats were probably commonplace amongst herds of ceratopsid dinosaurs.

The Mojo Fun Triceratops Scene – Two Horned Dinosaurs Confront Each Other

Mojo Fun Triceratops and the pterosaur Tropeognathus.

Mojo Fun Triceratops – a pair of evenly matched dinosaurs face off against each other whilst pterosaurs fly past.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Such large animals would need a lot of vegetable matter each day and from the backdrop to the conflict it looks like there is not that much for these dinosaurs to eat, so the fight might have broken out over competition for limited resources, in this case food.  It is always a pleasure to see how model manufacturers set about promoting their wares.

The New for 2019 Mojo Fun Triceratops Dinosaur Model

Mojo Fun Triceratops dinosaur model (2019).

The Mojo Fun Triceratops dinosaur model (2019).  A beautifully modelled and skilfully painted replica of Triceratops, part of the Mojo Fun prehistoric life model range.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the Mojo Fun Triceratops and the rest of the figures in the Mojo Fun range: Mojo Fun Prehistoric and Extinct.

Pterosaurs Flying Overhead

The quartet of pterosaurs flying serenely over the pair of Triceratops are representatives of the Ornithocheiridae family of flying reptiles.  The pterosaur is Tropeognathus, although the validity of this genus has been questioned by a number of academics.  The prehistoric scene, although carefully choreographed by Mojo Fun, is very unlikely to have actually occurred.  The Ornithocheiridae do have an extensive temporal range but this covers the Lower Cretaceous and the very first stage of the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian), a time range of some 140 to 93 million years ago.  In contrast, the Triceratops genus is confined to the very end of the Cretaceous.  It is likely that the very last of the ornithocheirid pterosaurs died out some at least 25 million years before Triceratops evolved.

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