All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
//September
10 09, 2019

A Special Dinosaur Delivery

By | September 10th, 2019|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

A Special Dinosaur Delivery

Everything Dinosaur has lots of customers in South America.  Sometimes some of our customers visit the UK and they request that if they are staying in the UK, could they order some prehistoric animal models and have Everything Dinosaur despatch them to a UK address such as a hotel or guest house.  By doing this, model collectors can get their hands on the latest prehistoric animal models, without having to worry about international deliveries.  Andre is a case in point.  He contacted Everything Dinosaur some months ago requesting that we reserve some up and coming, 2019 dinosaur models for him.  He explained that he would be travelling to London in September and if possible, could we liaise with him so that his models could be delivered to the hotel where he was staying.  Sure enough, our team members were happy to oblige, to set aside the models he wanted as they came into stock and then organise a courier delivery to his hotel.

Delighted with our customer service, Andre kindly sent in a picture of the latest additions to his model collection.

Another Successful Everything Dinosaur Delivery

Safely delivered to a customer's hotel - a selection of prehistoric animal models.

All safely delivered to a customer’s hotel – a selection of prehistoric animal models.

Picture Credit: Andre

Papo and PNSO Prehistoric Animal Models

In total, our team members organised the delivery of seven dinosaur figures from the Papo “les dinosaures” model range and the PNSO “Age of Dinosaurs” scale figures.  We know that regular readers of our blog will be able to name all these replicas, but just for the record, here is the list of models that we sent out to Andre’s hotel.

  • PNSO Lucas the Giganotosaurus 1:35 scale figure (back left).
  • PNSO Lucio the Amargasaurus 1:35 scale figure (back centre).
  • The Papo new colour variant Stegosaurus model (back right).
  • PNSO “Sede” the Ankylosaurus dinosaur model (front left).
  • PNSO Dayong the Yangchuanosaurus and Xiaobei the Chungkingosaurus 1:35 scale model diorama (front centre).
  • The Papo Gorgosaurus dinosaur model (front centre).
  • The Papo Pentaceratops (front right).

Andre kindly emailed to let us know that his parcel had arrived, he stated:

“Everything perfectly delivered.  Thank you very, very much for reserving them for me.  These are the first PNSO models I got and they’re amazing!”

As model collectors ourselves we were happy to help out.

To view the Papo “les dinosaures” model range including the new Stegosaurus, Pentaceratops and Gorgosaurus models: Papo Prehistoric Animals and Dinosaurs

For the PNSO “Age of Dinosaurs” model range: PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Model Range

9 09, 2019

Picturing a Papo Pentaceratops

By | September 9th, 2019|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Picturing a Papo Pentaceratops

One of the most enthusiastically received new prehistoric animal models of 2019 is the Papo Pentaceratops.  When we first published photographs of this new horned dinosaur model from the French manufacturer (Papo), earlier this year, a number of collectors and dinosaur model fans commented on its unusual pose.  After all, a rearing ceratopsid is very different from the postures normally associated with Triceratops, Torosaurus, Styracosaurus, Pachyrhinosaurus and so forth.

However, this dinosaur model has proved to be a big hit.  Everything Dinosaur team members have received lots of photographs, positive feedback and drawings of this Papo dinosaur model.  For example, young dinosaur fan Caldey sent in a beautiful illustration of her Papo Pentaceratops.

Caldey’s Illustration of the Papo Pentaceratops Dinosaur Model

A drawing of the new for 2019 Papo Pentaceratops by Caldey.

Caldey’s illustration of the new for 2019 Papo Pentaceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Caldey

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Our thanks to Caldey and all the other dinosaur model collectors and fans who have sent in pictures and photographs of their Papo model.  It is great to see how this new prehistoric animal figure has inspired so many people to get in touch.”

Pentaceratops en Español “Cara Con Cinco Cuernos”

Everything Dinosaur has received feedback about the Papo Pentaceratops from customers all over the world.  One of our customers from Chile commented:

“Increíble modelo y pintura, además de una versatilidad en su forma de posar.”

This translates from the Spanish as:

“Incredible model and painting, as well as versatility in the way that it has been posed.”

It seems that this prehistoric posture has been very well received indeed.  Can we expect more posing prehistoric animals from Papo in the future?  Collectors and fans of dinosaur replicas will have to wait and see what 2020 brings.  The Pentaceratops “five horned face”, or as they say in Chile “cara con cinco cuernos”, has gathered a world-wide following.

Proudly Holding a Papo Pentaceratops

Papo Pentaceratops dinosaur model.

The Papo Pentaceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our thanks to Caldey and all the other Everything Dinosaur customers who have been in touch to sing the praises of the Pentaceratops.

To view the complete range of Papo prehistoric animals available from Everything Dinosaur, including the new for 2019 Papo Gorgosaurus and the Pentaceratops: Papo Dinosaurs (Les Dinosaures) and Prehistoric Animal Models

8 09, 2019

Providing a Testimonial for the Chamber of Commerce

By | September 8th, 2019|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Providing a Testimonial for the Chamber of Commerce

Last week, Everything Dinosaur was asked by our local Chamber of Commerce to provide feedback on the support we had received from the Chamber’s International Trade team.  We were happy to oblige and team members spent part of the weekend composing a suitable press release.  The Chamber of Commerce publishes a quarterly magazine and they wanted our permission to feature Everything Dinosaur in an article related to the Chamber’s support of exports and international trade.

The Press Release Sent to the Chamber of Commerce

Chamber of Commerce and Industry tesimonial request.

Everything Dinosaur’s testimonial about the support and advice received from the Chamber of Commerce (PR653).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Chamber wanted between fifty and hundred words from members who had benefitted from their advice and support.  The testimonials are to be included in an article about international trade in the next edition of the Chamber’s magazine.

The Everything Dinosaur testimonial states:

“The support and assistance of Jacqui [International Trade Manager] and her team has proved invaluable.  We have relied on their expertise and advice to help shape our efforts to internationalise our business.  Approximately, one third of all our mail order sales now come from overseas.  The South Cheshire Chamber of Commerce has played a significant role in helping to shape the future direction of Everything Dinosaur.”

We have been featured in a number of magazines and other publications in recent years.  After all, we now have thousands of customers all over the world.  Team members are looking forward to seeing our contribution to this article in print in the next few weeks or so.

7 09, 2019

Everything Dinosaur and the New Payment Services Directive 2

By | September 7th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur and the New Payment Services Directive 2

Back in July, we wrote a short blog post about changes to the way in which credit/debit card payments will be processed from September 14th 2019.  A new European Union directive is coming into force.  Known as PSD2, it aims to bring in new laws to increase consumer protection across Europe.  A key feature of this directive is the introduction of additional on-line security for ecommerce transactions.

Everything Dinosaur is compliant with this new directive, as you would expect, we have been planning for these changes for some months now and testing of the beta sites has been completed and the new framework placed on Everything Dinosaur’s live website.  All has been sorted, everything has been prepared in readiness for the deadline of September 14th.

Everything Dinosaur is Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) Compliant

Everything Dinosaur - Payment Services Directive 2 compliance.

Everything Dinosaur and PSD2 compliance.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

When PSD2 comes into effect next week, some customers may see some changes when it comes to paying for goods and services on-line.  In essence, stronger identity checks may be required and the customers’ payment journey through an on-line check-out may look a little different.

To read our July article that provides more information on this directive and what it might mean for your ecommerce transactions: Everything Dinosaur and 3-D Secure Ecommerce Transactions.

6 09, 2019

T. rex and Air-conditioning

By | September 6th, 2019|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

T. rex had “Air Conditioning”

Scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and the University of Florida have turned a theory about Tyrannosaurus rex (and other archosaurs for that matter), on its head.  Previously, palaeontologists had thought that two large holes in the roof of the skull of T. rex (the dorsotemporal fenestra), were filled with muscles to assist with movement of the jaws.  However, a thermal imaging study of extant archosaurs, specifically American alligators at the St Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park (Florida), has led the researchers to suggest that these skull holes played a role in helping this huge animal to regulate its temperature.  The team, which included Larry Witmer, a professor of anatomy at Ohio University, conclude that, in essence T. rex had an air-conditioning unit in its head.

An Imagined Thermal Image Taken in the Cretaceous Night

The glowing dorsotemporal fenestra of T. rex and two crocodiles.

Archosaurs at night!  An imagined thermal image showing the glowing dorsotemporal fenestra of Cretaceous archosaurs.

Picture Credit: Brian Engh

Helping to Regulate Body Temperature

Lead author of the scientific paper, published in the journal “The Anatomical Record”, Professor Casey Holliday was puzzled by the idea that these skull holes were associated with muscle attachments.  The Professor of anatomy at the Missouri University School of Medicine commented:

“It’s really weird for a muscle to come up from the jaw, make a 90-degree turn, and go along the roof of the skull.  Yet, we now have a lot of compelling evidence for blood vessels in this area, based on our work with alligators and other reptiles.”

The researchers used thermal imaging cameras to examine alligators in captivity and they believe that these living archosaurs can provide key insights into the anatomy of their long dead, cousins the Dinosauria.

A Thermal Image of the “Hot Spots” on the Head of an American Alligator

American alligator thermal image.

A thermal image of the head of an American alligator.

Picture Credit: University of Missouri

Studying American Alligators

Explaining the significance of this new study, co-author Kent Vliet (University of Florida), stated:

“An alligator’s body heat depends on its environment.  Therefore, we noticed when it was cooler and the alligators are trying to warm up, our thermal imaging showed big hot spots in these holes in the roof of their skull, indicating a rise in temperature.  Yet, later in the day when it’s warmer, the holes appear dark, like they were turned off to keep cool.  This is consistent with prior evidence that alligators have a cross-current circulatory system — or an internal thermostat, so to speak.”

If the dorsotemporal fenestra of theropods such as Tyrannosaurus rex were also lined with blood vessels then these holes could have played a role in helping dinosaurs to control their body temperatures.  For such a big animal, the problem might not be trying to keep warm, but actually the avoidance of overheating.  The blood vessels occupying the dorsotemporal fenestra would have been covered by skin and the proximity of these vessels to the outside environment might have helped T. rex to lose heat.

An Speculative Thermal Image (Dorsal View) Showing the Head of T. rex

A thermal image of the head of T. rex.

A dorsal view of the head of T. rex showing the two “hot spots” the dorsotemporal fenestra.

Picture Credit: Brian Engh

T. rex and alligators have similar holes in the top of their head.  By studying the anatomy of living animals, scientists can gain valuable insights into the anatomy of long extinct relatives such as the dinosaurs.

The Skull of a Gharial Showing Two Large, Prominent Dorsotemporal Fenestra 

The skull of a gharial.

The skull of a gharial from the Grant Museum of Zoology (London).  The large holes in the skull roof are the dorsotemporal fenestra.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a press release from the University of Missouri in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “The Frontoparietal Fossa and Dorsotemporal Fenestra of Archosaurs and Their Significance for Interpretations of Vascular and Muscular Anatomy in Dinosaurs” by Casey M. Holliday, William Ruger Porter, Kent A. Vliet and Lawrence M. Witmer published in the journal The Anatomical Record.

5 09, 2019

Non-dinosaurian Dinosauromorphs from Colorado

By | September 5th, 2019|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Kwanasaurus williamparkeri – The Newest Member of the Silesauridae

Dinosaur discoveries usually grab all the headlines.  However, our attention was caught recently with the publication of a scientific paper in the academic journal “PeerJ”, describing a new species of silesaurid, a Triassic reptile that was so very closely related to the Dinosauria, but not quite a dinosaur.  The animal has been named Kwanasaurus williamparkeri and it roamed what was to become Colorado some 210 million years ago.

A Skeletal Reconstruction and a Life Reconstruction of Kwanasaurus williamparkeri

Skeletal drawing and life reconstruction of K. williamparkeri.

Skeletal drawing and life reconstruction of Kwanasaurus williamparkeri.

Picture Credit: PeerJ/Jeffrey W Martz and Bryan J Small

The picture (above), shows (A) a skeletal reconstruction with known fossil elements shaded light grey.  The skeletal reconstruction is based on the fossilised remains of several individuals all scaled to the same size.  The body plan is based on Silesaurus.  Note the scale bars equal ten centimetres given for probable largest specimen (DMNH EPV.34579) and one of the smallest specimens.(DMNH EPV.63139).

From the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of Colorado

Numerous fragmentary fossils representing parts of the jaw, limb bones and possibly a scapula and lower leg bones along with isolated teeth have been found in the “red siltstone” member of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation (Eagle Basin, Colorado).  The strata were deposited in the Late Triassic (215-207 mya – middle to late Norian.  Kwanasaurus  is the northernmost silesaurid known from the Americas and only the fourth taxon recognised from North America, although more specimens of silesaurids are likely to be found in the future, after all the Silesauridae was only formally erected in 2010.  In addition, the authors of the paper, report on the discovery of fossils ascribed to Dromomeron romeri, a bipedal member of the Dinosauromorpha but from another branch (the Lagerpetidae), thus, we have two non-dinosaurian dinosauromorphs from these sediments.  This is the first documented occurrence of D. romeri from the Chinle Formation of the Eagle Basin of Colorado

Upper Jawbone (Maxillae) and Accompanying Line Drawings – Kwanasaurus williamparkeri

Kwanasaurus upper jaw bone images and line drawings.

Images of upper jaw bones maxillae and accompanying line drawings of Kwanasaurus.

Picture Credit: PeerJ

“Eagle Lizard” – Probably a Herbivore

The genus name means “eagle lizard” honouring the town and county of Eagle, as the fossils were found nearby. The trivial epithet honours Dr William Parker, a vertebrate palaeontologist who has helped develop our understanding of Triassic archosaurs.  These types of archosaurs were contemporaneous with the first dinosaurs and the discovery of Kwanasaurus adds further support to the theory that for millions of years different types of archosaurs co-existed and that the Dinosauria did not have a sudden rise to ecological dominance.  The robust jaws and the teeth indicate that Kwanasaurus was probably herbivorous, this suggests a dietary specialism amongst silesaurids as most other genera are believed to have been omnivorous.

Views of the Left Dentary (Lower Jaw) of K. williamparkeri with Accompanying Line Drawings

Views and line drawings of the dentary of Kwanasaurus.

Views of the left jawbone (dentary) of Kwanasaurus.   The deep lower jaw and the shape of the teeth suggest a herbivorous diet.

Picture Credit: PeerJ

The scientific paper: “Non-dinosaurian dinosauromorphs from the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) of the Eagle Basin, northern Colorado: Dromomeron romeri (Lagerpetidae) and a new taxon, Kwanasaurus williamparkeri (Silesauridae)” by Jeffrey W Martz and Bryan J Small published in PeerJ.

4 09, 2019

The Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

By | September 4th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

The Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

The Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model is back in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  This recently introduced Ceratopsian figure (spring 2019), has proved to be a favourite amongst fans of Schleich and dinosaur models.  Our initial stocks sold out quickly and it is great to see “devil horned face” back in our warehouse again.

Back in Stock at Everything Dinosaur – the Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur replica.

The Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Diabloceratops eatoni

Known from a single skull discovered in 2002 and a second skull specimen found eight years later, Diabloceratops is the oldest known ceratopsid, it having roamed the upper parts of the United States some 79 million years ago.  It is regarded as a basal centrosaurine and it was the first member of the Centrosaurinae to be have been discovered south of Montana.  Zuniceratops (Z. christopheri), which is known from the mid Turonian of New Mexico, is regarded as the sister taxon.

To view the Schleich Diabloceratops model and the rest of the replicas in the Schleich model range: Schleich Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models

A Close-up View of the Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.

A close up of the front end (anterior portion) of the Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.  The model has beautiful detailing on the skin and the Ceratopsian frill is very striking.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

What’s in a Name?

The genus name reflects the remarkable pair of horns that stick out from the back of the neck frill, whilst the species name honours vertebrate palaeontologist Jeff Eaton of Weber State University. The geosciences professor has been honoured for his work in Utah (where the Diabloceratops specimens originate), Professor Eaton has had a trace fossil, a lizard and a marsupial, as well as a dinosaur named after him.  The holotype Diabloceratops fossil material consisting of a partial skull and elements from the jaw, along with a second skull ascribed to this genus in 2010, are housed in the Natural History Museum of Utah (Salt Lake City, Utah).

The fossils were excavated from the Wahweap Formation near Last Chance Creek in southern Utah.

The Schleich Diabloceratops has received many favourable reviews, including this one from a French-speaking Everything Dinosaur customer:

“Beau modèle avec couleurs splendides”, which translates as “beautiful model with splendid colours”.

A Scale Drawing of Diabloceratops eatoni

A scale drawing of Diabloceratops eatoni.

A scale drawing of Diabloceratops eatoni (human figure provides scale).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

3 09, 2019

Colourful Creative Dinosaurs

By | September 3rd, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Colourful Creative Dinosaurs

Our thanks to young Nataliya (Year 2), who sent into Everything Dinosaur a beautiful illustration of a dinosaur that she had designed following a visit to her school by one of our team members.  Nataliya and her classmates had taken up our challenge to design a dinosaur as part of an extension exercise that arose following one of our dinosaur and fossil workshops at the school.  The dinosaur was named “spikeraptor” and despite its fearsome name, Nataliya explained that this dinosaur was a herbivore and even included a picture of some leaves that the dinosaur was grazing upon in her prehistoric portrait.

A Colourful Dinosaur Design – “Spikeraptor”

A colourful green dinosaur - Spikeraptor the product of the imagination of young Nataliya (Key Stage 1).

A colourful green dinosaur – Spikeraptor the product of the imagination of young Nataliya (Year 2).

Picture Credit: Nataliya (Key Stage 1) and Everything Dinosaur

Lovely Labels!

As part of a writing exercise we asked the children to label their prehistoric animal’s body parts.  Nataliya was keen to emphasis the spikes and prickles on her dinosaur and our congratulations to Nataliya and the rest of the class for sending in some super drawings with fantastic examples of handwriting.  These drawings have made our day and we shall post them up in our warehouse so that all the Everything Dinosaur team members can view them.

2 09, 2019

Making Preparations for KS3

By | September 2nd, 2019|Key Stage 3/4|Comments Off on Making Preparations for KS3

Making Preparations for Key Stage 3

It has been a busy end to August for our teaching team as they finalise plans for school and college visits over the autumn term (2019).  All has been put in place and prepared as the schools start back.  We have dealt with the last minute enquiries and provided what support and assistance that we can.  Everything Dinosaur team members are involved in a variety of teaching projects including some work with Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 students.  Our aim is to support the science element of the curriculum, especially those areas related to biology, chemistry and genetics.

In addition, we have been contacted with requests for careers advice.

The Practical Implications of Scientific Working

Advice on fieldwork has been provided by Everything Dinosaur.

Learning about evolution, Darwin and genetics by studying the fossil record.

The Purpose of Key Stage 3 Science

When preparing lesson plans for older students (KS3 and KS4), we keep a list on the desk which reminds of the purpose of science for these age groups.  This helps us to focus on meeting the learning needs of the class.

For example, here is the list we use when considering a KS3 class (Year 7 to Year 9).

  • Use scientific ideas, theories and models to help explain current/past events (link to evolution and to climate change).
  • Build on existing scientific knowledge from Key Stage 2 and to make connections between the different scientific disciplines.
  • Understand a range of familiar, everyday applications of science.
  • Consider the advantages and disadvantages of scientific developments in the context of their impact on the environment, humanity and the planet
  • Explore different views on topic areas and consider the reasons for these differences.
  • Emphasis the role of building empirical and experimental evidence to support findings and scientific ideas.
  • Design and conduct investigations of different types, making use of available resources and reference sources.
  • To critique and evaluate the experiments undertaken and to consider how the research could be improved/developed.
  • To consider the role of scientific communication in disseminating research findings – how does science reach a wider audience?

These lists that we have developed act as an “aide mémoire” to ensure that we remain focused on the learning needs of each class.

2 09, 2019

Ammonite Biozones and the Biostratigraphic Column

By | September 2nd, 2019|Geology, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Ammonite Biozones and the Biostratigraphic Column

It was the English engineer William Smith (1769-1839), who pioneered the idea that different strata located in different places could be correlated using the fossils that were contained therein.  Although, his astonishing feat of compiling the world’s first geological map did not receive all the recognition it deserved, after all, it was only later in his life that his achievements gained prominence in scientific circles, William Smith is regarded by many as the “father of geology”.

As he examined different layers of rock he perceived that any succession of fossils could represent particular periods of geological time.  Furthermore, the age of widely separated strata could be compared and correlated using the fossils that they contained.  These fossils helped to indicate the relative age of various rock formations.  Thus, Smith helped to lay the foundations for the science of biostratigraphy.  Ammonites and other invertebrate fossils are extremely important in the relative dating process.

Different Fossils of Ammonites Associated with Different Layers of Rock – Building a Biostratigraphical Column

Ammonite Biozones

Demonstrating a sequence of ammonite fossils identified from specific strata that helps to form a biostratigraphic column.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The above photograph was taken by an Everything Dinosaur team member on a recent visit to the Naturmuseum Senckenberg (Frankfurt, Germany), it demonstrates that different types of ammonite fossils are associated with different layers of rocks in a sequence of deposition.  The stratigraphic column can therefore be divided into zones (biozones), that are characterised by one or more particular type of fossil.  The sequence of these biozones in the correct order, creates a biostratigraphical column.

Ammonites are ideal zone fossil candidates.  These cephalopods were ubiquitous in Mesozoic marine deposits, their shells formed abundant fossils and ammonites evolved rapidly into many distinctive types (species).  We congratulate the Museum for such a beautifully created and instructive display.

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