All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
//September
17 09, 2019

Preparing for a School Visit

By | September 17th, 2019|Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils, Teaching|0 Comments

Preparing for a Fossil Workshop

The autumn term is well underway and team members at Everything Dinosaur are busy conducting dinosaur themed and fossil workshops in schools, catering for a wide range of different age groups.  This week, our team members will be dealing with the eager and very excitable Early Years Foundation Stage classes (Nursery and Reception), as well as working with slightly more mature (we hope), students in Key Stages 3 and 4.

One of the things we have been asked to discuss with the students in year nine and ten that we will be working with this week, is potential career options in the Earth sciences.  This is certainly a very broad subject and we hope to provide some pointers.  We have been brushing up on our knowledge regarding career paths as well as brushing up some rather beautiful Dactylioceras ammonite fossils that we intend to use in a short exercise looking at taphonomy and the importance of index fossils.

Selecting Fossils to Use in Our Exercise with Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 Students

Ammonite fossils (Dactylioceras).

A selection of ammonite fossils to be used in an exercise exploring the role of index fossils with science students.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

16 09, 2019

Rebor GrabNGo Komodo Dragon Model

By | September 16th, 2019|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Rebor GrabNGo Komodo Dragon Model

Everything Dinosaur team members have been taking an exclusive look at the up-and-coming Rebor Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) model, which is the first in a new product line entitled “GrabNGo”.  This is a beautiful, highly detailed model of the largest living lizard, which is sometimes referred to as the Komodo monitor.

The New Rebor GrabNGo Komodo Dragon (V. komodoensis) Replica

The Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon model.

The new for 2019 Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A 1:6 Scale Komodo Dragon Replica

The model measures a fraction under 48 centimetres in length, but when the curvature of that impressive tail is taken into account the model’s true size is around half a metre, making this a 1:6 scale replica.  The skin texture has been skilfully created with accurate folds and appropriately proportioned digits.  The underside of the body and tail also shows lots of amazing detail and scales, particularly along the underside of the neck and jaw, although our figure lacks a cloaca.  The production sample we were kindly sent does not have a CE mark so the skin texture is uninterrupted along the entire animal’s length.

Amazing Detail on the Head of the New Rebor GrabNGo Komodo Dragon Model

The fine detailing around the head and neck of the new Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon replica.

The fine detailing around the head and neck of the new Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon model.  The dark eye has been given a wet-look with the application of a fine gloss.  This contrasts nicely with the muted tones of the body colouration.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A View Showing the Variety of Scales Represented on the Head and the Back of the Model

A wonderful representation of the largest living lizard - Komodo dragon.

A dorsal view of the new Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Dragon Skin

The lightweight but reinforced hollow vinyl material gives this figure a very solid feel and the subtle painting provides the viewer with an impression of an expensive desk-top figure.  The Komodo dragon is renowned for its tough hide.  The skin of this lizard, which can reach lengths of up to 2.6 metres and weigh in excess of 70 kilograms, is reinforced by tiny dermal scales (osteoderms).  It is thought that this armour helps to prevent injury when it attacks large prey or during intraspecific combat.

Skin Folds around the Belly Area and the Back of the Head – Komodo Dragon Model

GrabNGo Komodo dragon figure (Rebor).

Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon figure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Megalania Connection

This Rebor GrabNGo figure could also be used to represent the extinct giant goanna of southern Australia – Megalania (Varanus priscus, or sometimes referred to as Megalania prisca).  It has been proposed that Megalania represents a sister taxon to the Komodo dragon and like its Indonesian cousin, it was an apex predator within the ecosystem.  Size estimates for Megalania vary but studies of fossilised dorsal vertebrae suggest a length of around 7 metres.  If this is the case, then the Rebor GrabNGo model would equate to a 1:14 scale replica.

Is this a Megalania or a Komodo Dragon?

Megalania or Komodo dragon? Your decide.

Komodo dragon or Megalania?  You decide.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Available Late September/Early October

The Rebor GrabNGo Komodo dragon is likely to be available before Christmas.  Everything Dinosaur team members are doing all they can to ship this model in quickly.

The price is estimated to be around £15.99 plus postage (GBP).

To join our priority reserve list for this exciting new figure: Email Everything Dinosaur to Reserve a Komodo Dragon Model

12 09, 2019

Year 1 Children Find Fossils

By | September 12th, 2019|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Year 1 Children Find Fossils

The children in Year 1 at St Joseph’s Primary (Lancashire), had a morning of pretending to be palaeontologists as their autumn term topic “Dinosaur Planet” was kicked-off in style.  The friendly staff had prepared a scheme of work all about dinosaurs, an area of learning used elsewhere in the school, as the Nursery children (EYFS), would also be studying Tyrannosaurus rex, Triceratops, Stegosaurus et al over the course of the academic year.

Prior to our visit to conduct a morning of dinosaur and fossil themed activities with the enthusiastic children, the teaching team had challenged the class to record in their topic books what they knew about these long extinct animals.  Our dinosaur expert was impressed with the neatness of the handwriting, how well the letters had been formed and the appropriate finger spacing between words.

“Dinosaur Planet” – What I Know About Dinosaurs

At the start of the dinosaur topic the Year 1 children recorded what they know about dinosaurs.

At the start of the dinosaur topic the Year 1 children recorded what they know about dinosaurs.  For example, one pupil wrote that dinosaurs are related to reptiles – that’s right, the Dinosauria are indeed a diverse group of reptiles.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Why Did Diplodocus Have a Long Neck?

As part of the writing exercise, referred to as KWL:

  • what I know?
  • what I want to know?
  • what have I learned?  An opportunity to check understanding at the end of the topic.

The year 1 children wanted to know why did a Diplodocus have a long neck?

Why Did a Diplodocus Have a Long Neck?

CollectA rearing Diplodocus dinosaur figure.

During the morning of dinosaur themed activities, the school visitor from Everything Dinosaur made sure to answer the question about the neck of Diplodocus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The first part of the morning involved visual and kinaesthetic learning with lots of physical exercises to help reinforce learning.  In the second part of the workshop, which was conducted in the classroom, the children were given the opportunity to find their own fossils.  The eager young palaeontologists found lots of fossils in our special challenge, teeth from prehistoric sharks, pieces of fossilised turtle shell, lots of ammonites and even some armour from a Jurassic crocodile!

The Children Demonstrated Lots of Pre-knowledge

Year 1 KWL exercise at the start of the dinosaur term topic.

KWL exercise (Year 1 term topic).  The Year 1 children were keen to demonstrate their knowledge about dinosaurs, even a Gallimimus was mentioned.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We are confident that the budding young palaeontologists at St Joseph’s Primary are going to really enjoy their autumn term topic.

11 09, 2019

Skull Bones of Saurornitholestes Point to Asian Migration

By | September 11th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

New Study Published on Saurornitholestes langstoni

Researchers based at the University of Alberta and the Royal Ontario Museum (Canada), have published a new scientific paper on the dinosaur nicknamed the “raptor of Alberta”.  The dinosaur – Saurornitholestes langstoni, was once thought to be a troodontid, but its placement within the Dromaeosauridae has been reinforced.  Furthermore, although no impressions of preserved feathers have ever been found in association with skeletal material, a tooth wear analysis conducted by the scientists suggests that a tooth in the upper jaw might have been specialised for preening feathers.

The Beautifully Preserved Saurornitholestes langstoni Specimen

The beautifully preserved and nearly complete Saurornitholestes langstoni fossil discovered in 2014.

The nearly complete Saurornitholestes langstoni fossil discovered in 2014.

Picture Credit: University of Alberta

The researchers who produced the scientific paper, two famous and very influential palaeontologists, Professor Philip Currie (University of Alberta) and Dr David Evans (Royal Ontario Museum), also suggest that their analysis of recently described skull bones supports the idea of at least two major faunal interchanges between Asia and North America during the Late Cretaceous.

Several Partial Skeletons – Hundreds of Isolated Teeth and Bones

In 1978, Saurornitholestes langstoni was formally described based on some fragmentary fossil bones found close to the small town of Patricia in southern Alberta four years before.  Since then, four additional partial skeletons ascribed to Saurornitholestes and hundreds of isolated teeth and bones have been recovered from the Upper Cretaceous sediments (Campanian faunal stage), of Alberta and Montana.  Despite these fossils, very little was known about the skull of S. langstoni, curtailing attempts to better understand the taxonomic relationship between this Canadian dromaeosaurid and other Asian forms such as Velociraptor mongoliensis and Tsaagan mangas.

A Scale Drawing of Saurornitholestes langstoni

Saurornitholestes langstoni illustration - scale drawing.

Saurornitholestes langstoni illustration (scale drawing).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Study of the 2014 Specimen

Frustrated by the lack of truly diagnostic fossil cranial material to study, palaeontologists could do very little to better understand where within the Dromaeosauridae the “raptor of Alberta” should reside.  This all changed in 2014 with the discovery of a nearly complete fossil specimen, ironically within a thousand metres of where the holotype specimen had been found back in 1978.  Although loaned out to Japan’s National Museum of Nature and Science (Tokyo), for a special exhibition marking fifty years of “raptor research”, analysis continued on the remarkable skeleton.

Writing in the academic journal “The Anatomical Record”, the scientists confirm that Saurornitholestes was similar in size to Velociraptor, but the facial region of the skull is relatively shorter, taller and wider.  The premaxillary teeth are distinctive, and fossil teeth collected in the Dinosaur Provincial Park (southern Alberta), ascribed to the dromaeosaurid Zapsalis abradens can now be identified as the second premaxillary tooth of S. langstoni.

A Close-up View of the Skull of S. langstoni 

Saurornitholestes langstoni fossil skull.

A close-up view of the fossilised skull of the 2014 specimen.  The skull bones were preserved in articulation, helping the scientists to understand the anatomy of the skull.

Picture Credit: University of Alberta

Teeth Used for Preening Feathers

A detailed microscopic study of the tiny abrasions preserved on the teeth located in the front of the upper jaw (premaxilla), have led the researchers to speculate that these teeth could have had a role in helping to preen and clean the dinosaur’s feathery coat.

A Typical Dromaeosaurid Tooth

Dromaeosaurid tooth from Alabama.

An isolated dromaeosaurid tooth with very different denticles (anterior and posterior).  Different sized serrations might have assisted with grooming as a secondary function of the tooth.

Picture Credit: David R. Schwimmer

A Distinctive North American Clade of Dromaeosaurs

With an almost complete specimen to study and, most importantly of all, a skull, the scientists have concluded that a distinctive North American clade of Late Cretaceous dromaeosaurids can be established within the Dromaeosauridae family.  A distinctive and separate branch from the Asian part of the Dromaeosauridae that includes the likes of Velociraptor.  Professor Currie and Dr Evans were able to identify many unique anatomical traits (autapomorphies), that permitted the establishment of this clade – the Saurornitholestinae.  This new information on the skull allows a more complete evaluation of the systematic position of Saurornitholestes langstoni within the Dromaeosauridae and supports the suggestion of at least two major faunal interchanges between Asia and North America during the Cretaceous.

At Everything Dinosaur, we have seen a resurgence in interest in “raptor” figures and models.  These theropod dinosaurs continue to feature prominently in dinosaur movies and the “Beasts of the Mesozoic” range of “raptor” models including an articulated replica of Saurornitholestes langstoni have been introduced.

To view the Beasts of the Mesozoic model range available from Everything Dinosaur: Beasts of the Mesozoic Figures

The scientific paper: “Cranial Anatomy of New Specimens of Saurornitholestes langstoni (Dinosauria, Theropoda, Dromaeosauridae) from the Dinosaur Park Formation (Campanian) of Alberta” by Philip J. Currie and David C. Evans published in the journal The Anatomical Record.

10 09, 2019

A Special Dinosaur Delivery

By | September 10th, 2019|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

A Special Dinosaur Delivery

Everything Dinosaur has lots of customers in South America.  Sometimes some of our customers visit the UK and they request that if they are staying in the UK, could they order some prehistoric animal models and have Everything Dinosaur despatch them to a UK address such as a hotel or guest house.  By doing this, model collectors can get their hands on the latest prehistoric animal models, without having to worry about international deliveries.  Andre is a case in point.  He contacted Everything Dinosaur some months ago requesting that we reserve some up and coming, 2019 dinosaur models for him.  He explained that he would be travelling to London in September and if possible, could we liaise with him so that his models could be delivered to the hotel where he was staying.  Sure enough, our team members were happy to oblige, to set aside the models he wanted as they came into stock and then organise a courier delivery to his hotel.

Delighted with our customer service, Andre kindly sent in a picture of the latest additions to his model collection.

Another Successful Everything Dinosaur Delivery

Safely delivered to a customer's hotel - a selection of prehistoric animal models.

All safely delivered to a customer’s hotel – a selection of prehistoric animal models.

Picture Credit: Andre

Papo and PNSO Prehistoric Animal Models

In total, our team members organised the delivery of seven dinosaur figures from the Papo “les dinosaures” model range and the PNSO “Age of Dinosaurs” scale figures.  We know that regular readers of our blog will be able to name all these replicas, but just for the record, here is the list of models that we sent out to Andre’s hotel.

  • PNSO Lucas the Giganotosaurus 1:35 scale figure (back left).
  • PNSO Lucio the Amargasaurus 1:35 scale figure (back centre).
  • The Papo new colour variant Stegosaurus model (back right).
  • PNSO “Sede” the Ankylosaurus dinosaur model (front left).
  • PNSO Dayong the Yangchuanosaurus and Xiaobei the Chungkingosaurus 1:35 scale model diorama (front centre).
  • The Papo Gorgosaurus dinosaur model (front centre).
  • The Papo Pentaceratops (front right).

Andre kindly emailed to let us know that his parcel had arrived, he stated:

“Everything perfectly delivered.  Thank you very, very much for reserving them for me.  These are the first PNSO models I got and they’re amazing!”

As model collectors ourselves we were happy to help out.

To view the Papo “les dinosaures” model range including the new Stegosaurus, Pentaceratops and Gorgosaurus models: Papo Prehistoric Animals and Dinosaurs

For the PNSO “Age of Dinosaurs” model range: PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Model Range

9 09, 2019

Picturing a Papo Pentaceratops

By | September 9th, 2019|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Picturing a Papo Pentaceratops

One of the most enthusiastically received new prehistoric animal models of 2019 is the Papo Pentaceratops.  When we first published photographs of this new horned dinosaur model from the French manufacturer (Papo), earlier this year, a number of collectors and dinosaur model fans commented on its unusual pose.  After all, a rearing ceratopsid is very different from the postures normally associated with Triceratops, Torosaurus, Styracosaurus, Pachyrhinosaurus and so forth.

However, this dinosaur model has proved to be a big hit.  Everything Dinosaur team members have received lots of photographs, positive feedback and drawings of this Papo dinosaur model.  For example, young dinosaur fan Caldey sent in a beautiful illustration of her Papo Pentaceratops.

Caldey’s Illustration of the Papo Pentaceratops Dinosaur Model

A drawing of the new for 2019 Papo Pentaceratops by Caldey.

Caldey’s illustration of the new for 2019 Papo Pentaceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Caldey

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Our thanks to Caldey and all the other dinosaur model collectors and fans who have sent in pictures and photographs of their Papo model.  It is great to see how this new prehistoric animal figure has inspired so many people to get in touch.”

Pentaceratops en Español “Cara Con Cinco Cuernos”

Everything Dinosaur has received feedback about the Papo Pentaceratops from customers all over the world.  One of our customers from Chile commented:

“Increíble modelo y pintura, además de una versatilidad en su forma de posar.”

This translates from the Spanish as:

“Incredible model and painting, as well as versatility in the way that it has been posed.”

It seems that this prehistoric posture has been very well received indeed.  Can we expect more posing prehistoric animals from Papo in the future?  Collectors and fans of dinosaur replicas will have to wait and see what 2020 brings.  The Pentaceratops “five horned face”, or as they say in Chile “cara con cinco cuernos”, has gathered a world-wide following.

Proudly Holding a Papo Pentaceratops

Papo Pentaceratops dinosaur model.

The Papo Pentaceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our thanks to Caldey and all the other Everything Dinosaur customers who have been in touch to sing the praises of the Pentaceratops.

To view the complete range of Papo prehistoric animals available from Everything Dinosaur, including the new for 2019 Papo Gorgosaurus and the Pentaceratops: Papo Dinosaurs (Les Dinosaures) and Prehistoric Animal Models

8 09, 2019

Providing a Testimonial for the Chamber of Commerce

By | September 8th, 2019|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Providing a Testimonial for the Chamber of Commerce

Last week, Everything Dinosaur was asked by our local Chamber of Commerce to provide feedback on the support we had received from the Chamber’s International Trade team.  We were happy to oblige and team members spent part of the weekend composing a suitable press release.  The Chamber of Commerce publishes a quarterly magazine and they wanted our permission to feature Everything Dinosaur in an article related to the Chamber’s support of exports and international trade.

The Press Release Sent to the Chamber of Commerce

Chamber of Commerce and Industry tesimonial request.

Everything Dinosaur’s testimonial about the support and advice received from the Chamber of Commerce (PR653).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Chamber wanted between fifty and hundred words from members who had benefitted from their advice and support.  The testimonials are to be included in an article about international trade in the next edition of the Chamber’s magazine.

The Everything Dinosaur testimonial states:

“The support and assistance of Jacqui [International Trade Manager] and her team has proved invaluable.  We have relied on their expertise and advice to help shape our efforts to internationalise our business.  Approximately, one third of all our mail order sales now come from overseas.  The South Cheshire Chamber of Commerce has played a significant role in helping to shape the future direction of Everything Dinosaur.”

We have been featured in a number of magazines and other publications in recent years.  After all, we now have thousands of customers all over the world.  Team members are looking forward to seeing our contribution to this article in print in the next few weeks or so.

7 09, 2019

Everything Dinosaur and the New Payment Services Directive 2

By | September 7th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur and the New Payment Services Directive 2

Back in July, we wrote a short blog post about changes to the way in which credit/debit card payments will be processed from September 14th 2019.  A new European Union directive is coming into force.  Known as PSD2, it aims to bring in new laws to increase consumer protection across Europe.  A key feature of this directive is the introduction of additional on-line security for ecommerce transactions.

Everything Dinosaur is compliant with this new directive, as you would expect, we have been planning for these changes for some months now and testing of the beta sites has been completed and the new framework placed on Everything Dinosaur’s live website.  All has been sorted, everything has been prepared in readiness for the deadline of September 14th.

Everything Dinosaur is Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) Compliant

Everything Dinosaur - Payment Services Directive 2 compliance.

Everything Dinosaur and PSD2 compliance.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

When PSD2 comes into effect next week, some customers may see some changes when it comes to paying for goods and services on-line.  In essence, stronger identity checks may be required and the customers’ payment journey through an on-line check-out may look a little different.

To read our July article that provides more information on this directive and what it might mean for your ecommerce transactions: Everything Dinosaur and 3-D Secure Ecommerce Transactions.

6 09, 2019

T. rex and Air-conditioning

By | September 6th, 2019|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles|0 Comments

T. rex had “Air Conditioning”

Scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and the University of Florida have turned a theory about Tyrannosaurus rex (and other archosaurs for that matter), on its head.  Previously, palaeontologists had thought that two large holes in the roof of the skull of T. rex (the dorsotemporal fenestra), were filled with muscles to assist with movement of the jaws.  However, a thermal imaging study of extant archosaurs, specifically American alligators at the St Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park (Florida), has led the researchers to suggest that these skull holes played a role in helping this huge animal to regulate its temperature.  The team, which included Larry Witmer, a professor of anatomy at Ohio University, conclude that, in essence T. rex had an air-conditioning unit in its head.

An Imagined Thermal Image Taken in the Cretaceous Night

The glowing dorsotemporal fenestra of T. rex and two crocodiles.

Archosaurs at night!  An imagined thermal image showing the glowing dorsotemporal fenestra of Cretaceous archosaurs.

Picture Credit: Brian Engh

Helping to Regulate Body Temperature

Lead author of the scientific paper, published in the journal “The Anatomical Record”, Professor Casey Holliday was puzzled by the idea that these skull holes were associated with muscle attachments.  The Professor of anatomy at the Missouri University School of Medicine commented:

“It’s really weird for a muscle to come up from the jaw, make a 90-degree turn, and go along the roof of the skull.  Yet, we now have a lot of compelling evidence for blood vessels in this area, based on our work with alligators and other reptiles.”

The researchers used thermal imaging cameras to examine alligators in captivity and they believe that these living archosaurs can provide key insights into the anatomy of their long dead, cousins the Dinosauria.

A Thermal Image of the “Hot Spots” on the Head of an American Alligator

American alligator thermal image.

A thermal image of the head of an American alligator.

Picture Credit: University of Missouri

Studying American Alligators

Explaining the significance of this new study, co-author Kent Vliet (University of Florida), stated:

“An alligator’s body heat depends on its environment.  Therefore, we noticed when it was cooler and the alligators are trying to warm up, our thermal imaging showed big hot spots in these holes in the roof of their skull, indicating a rise in temperature.  Yet, later in the day when it’s warmer, the holes appear dark, like they were turned off to keep cool.  This is consistent with prior evidence that alligators have a cross-current circulatory system — or an internal thermostat, so to speak.”

If the dorsotemporal fenestra of theropods such as Tyrannosaurus rex were also lined with blood vessels then these holes could have played a role in helping dinosaurs to control their body temperatures.  For such a big animal, the problem might not be trying to keep warm, but actually the avoidance of overheating.  The blood vessels occupying the dorsotemporal fenestra would have been covered by skin and the proximity of these vessels to the outside environment might have helped T. rex to lose heat.

An Speculative Thermal Image (Dorsal View) Showing the Head of T. rex

A thermal image of the head of T. rex.

A dorsal view of the head of T. rex showing the two “hot spots” the dorsotemporal fenestra.

Picture Credit: Brian Engh

T. rex and alligators have similar holes in the top of their head.  By studying the anatomy of living animals, scientists can gain valuable insights into the anatomy of long extinct relatives such as the dinosaurs.

The Skull of a Gharial Showing Two Large, Prominent Dorsotemporal Fenestra 

The skull of a gharial.

The skull of a gharial from the Grant Museum of Zoology (London).  The large holes in the skull roof are the dorsotemporal fenestra.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a press release from the University of Missouri in the compilation of this article.

The scientific paper: “The Frontoparietal Fossa and Dorsotemporal Fenestra of Archosaurs and Their Significance for Interpretations of Vascular and Muscular Anatomy in Dinosaurs” by Casey M. Holliday, William Ruger Porter, Kent A. Vliet and Lawrence M. Witmer published in the journal The Anatomical Record.

4 09, 2019

The Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

By | September 4th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

The Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

The Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model is back in stock at Everything Dinosaur.  This recently introduced Ceratopsian figure (spring 2019), has proved to be a favourite amongst fans of Schleich and dinosaur models.  Our initial stocks sold out quickly and it is great to see “devil horned face” back in our warehouse again.

Back in Stock at Everything Dinosaur – the Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur replica.

The Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Diabloceratops eatoni

Known from a single skull discovered in 2002 and a second skull specimen found eight years later, Diabloceratops is the oldest known ceratopsid, it having roamed the upper parts of the United States some 79 million years ago.  It is regarded as a basal centrosaurine and it was the first member of the Centrosaurinae to be have been discovered south of Montana.  Zuniceratops (Z. christopheri), which is known from the mid Turonian of New Mexico, is regarded as the sister taxon.

To view the Schleich Diabloceratops model and the rest of the replicas in the Schleich model range: Schleich Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models

A Close-up View of the Schleich Diabloceratops Dinosaur Model

Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.

A close up of the front end (anterior portion) of the Schleich Diabloceratops dinosaur model.  The model has beautiful detailing on the skin and the Ceratopsian frill is very striking.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

What’s in a Name?

The genus name reflects the remarkable pair of horns that stick out from the back of the neck frill, whilst the species name honours vertebrate palaeontologist Jeff Eaton of Weber State University. The geosciences professor has been honoured for his work in Utah (where the Diabloceratops specimens originate), Professor Eaton has had a trace fossil, a lizard and a marsupial, as well as a dinosaur named after him.  The holotype Diabloceratops fossil material consisting of a partial skull and elements from the jaw, along with a second skull ascribed to this genus in 2010, are housed in the Natural History Museum of Utah (Salt Lake City, Utah).

The fossils were excavated from the Wahweap Formation near Last Chance Creek in southern Utah.

The Schleich Diabloceratops has received many favourable reviews, including this one from a French-speaking Everything Dinosaur customer:

“Beau modèle avec couleurs splendides”, which translates as “beautiful model with splendid colours”.

A Scale Drawing of Diabloceratops eatoni

A scale drawing of Diabloceratops eatoni.

A scale drawing of Diabloceratops eatoni (human figure provides scale).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

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