Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus

By | July 9th, 2019|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus

Safari Ltd have published a series of images depicting some of the latest introductions in the Wild Safari Prehistoric World model range.  Today, we feature the Parasaurolophus, a dinosaur that has been depicted several times over the history of Safari Ltd models.  The latest incarnation of Parasaurolophus, was introduced in 2017, one of thirteen prehistoric animal models launched by the U.S.-based company that year.

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus Dinosaur Model

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Parasaurolophus dinosaur model.

A pair of Parasaurolophus cooling off in the Late Cretaceous of North America.

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd/Everything Dinosaur

Parasaurolophus walkeri

Known from numerous very nearly complete and partial skeletons, Parasaurolophus was geographically widely distributed (Alberta to New Mexico – possibly), it is known from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian faunal stage), although there are some unverified reports that this dinosaur may have persisted into the Maastrichtian faunal stage of the Cretaceous.  It is easily recognisable for its long, backward pointing head crest.   Despite the amount of fossil material scientists have to study, the exact size of this herbivorous dinosaur remains open to speculation, with some estimates putting this dinosaur’s maximum length at more than ten metres.  Measurements of the femur (thigh bone), indicate that this duck-billed dinosaur may have weighed more than three tonnes.  Several species have been assigned to the Parasaurolophus genus, perhaps the best known of which is P. walkeri, mainly because this Parasaurolophus species had the more spectacular crest compared to other species in this genus.

Parasaurolophus walkeri – Scale Drawing

Scale drawing Parasaurolophus walkeri.

A crested, duck-billed dinosaur.  A scale drawing of the Late Cretaceous lamebeosaurine dinosaur Parasaurolophus walkeri.  Note the thick-set upper legs and the wide tail.  Recent studies indicate that this facultative biped was very robust.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur