All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
//March
11 03, 2018

Google Doodle – Dinosaurs for Mother’s Day

By | March 11th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page|0 Comments

Mother’s Day Dinosaurs

The Google doodle for the UK and Ireland today is a pair of dinosaurs (we think).  The doodle has been put up in honour of Mother’s Day and the painting represents one child’s view of a mother dinosaur with its baby.  At least to us, who spend a lot of the time looking at dinosaurs, this is what the drawing resembles.

Google Doodle Dinosaurs

Google Doodle - dinosaurs.

Google Doodle March 11th 2018 for Mother’s Day.

Picture Credit: Google

Do Armoured Dinosaurs Make Good Parents?

Whether or not the non-avian dinosaurs made good parents is a topic often debated amongst palaeontologists.  Like their close relatives, the birds, non-avian dinosaurs probably adopted a range of strategies when it came to looking after their young.  Nesting sites discovered in the United States strongly suggest that Maiasaura, (M. peeblesorum), a Late Cretaceous Hadrosaur, fed their young and looked after them, whilst other types of dinosaur probably adopted different behaviours.

To read our post about “Good Mother Lizard”: Maiasaura and Marsh

An Illustration of a Maiasaura and Young

Maiasaura drawing.

The person in the picture provides a scale so the size of this dinosaur can be estimated.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Fossils of very young Maiasaura indicate that these dinosaurs were not capable of leaving their nest and that they were dependent on the adult animals to feed them.  At the other end of what is a spectrum, precocial animals are born ready to lead much more independent lives.  Precocial young are able to leave the nest shortly after birth/hatching and are capable of feeding themselves.  As for evidence of armoured dinosaurs and their behaviour with regards to bringing up baby, the evidence is less substantial.  However, a number of young individuals of armoured dinosaurs have been found in a single bone bed.  The fossils come from an armoured dinosaur known from northern China (Inner Mongolia), called Pinacosaurus (P. grangeri).  If these young Pinacosaurus died together, it does suggest that these animals lived in social groups.  This may have implications for parenting behaviour.

Late Cretaceous Northern China

China - Late Cretaceous

Late Cretaceous China.  Pinacosaurus can be seen in the foreground.

Picture Credit: Zhao Chuang

Team members at Everything Dinosaur also recall coming across a research paper that reported upon the discovery of an adult armoured dinosaur and a juvenile being found together.  Although, it is difficult to interpret the exact circumstances, the fossils could represent an adult and offspring having perished together.

An Armoured Dinosaur Themed Artwork on Display in School

Stegosaurus artwork in school.

How many hands?

Picture Credit: Bamford Academy Foundation Stage

On this Mothering Sunday, it is fitting to consider whether dinosaurs were altricial or precocial.  It is likely, that just like birds, the Dinosauria exhibited a number of behaviours.

A “Handy” Illustration of a Monster Created by School Children

Hands inspire artwork in school.

A “handy” way to create a prehistoric animal in the classroom.

Picture Credit: Feversham Primary

Happy Mother’s Day.

10 03, 2018

Finalising Fact Sheets for March Deliveries

By | March 10th, 2018|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Brontosaurus Fact Sheet for the CollectA Brontosaurus Model

The first of the new for 2018 CollectA figures are due in stock at Everything Dinosaur at the end of this month (March 2018).  Preparations to receive the new models along with deliveries from Papo and Mojo Fun are well underway.  However, as we send out a fact sheet on virtually every named animal we supply, our team members have been busy compiling a fact sheet on the famous Sauropod Brontosaurus, as CollectA will be introducing a Brontosaurus figure this year.

Everything Dinosaur’s Scale Drawing of Brontosaurus

Drawing of Brontosaurus.

A scale drawing of Brontosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Bully for Brontosaurus

The CollectA Brontosaurus model has a release date of mid-2018, it will be part of the company’s extensive “Prehistoric Life” collection of not-to-scale dinosaur models.  The double row of scutes running along the back of the figure is an interpretation of the fossil material related to diplodocids that suggests that some types of these long-necked, Late Jurassic dinosaurs had dermal armour.

The New for 2018 CollectA “Prehistoric Life” Brontosaurus Model

CollectA Brontosaurus replica.

The CollectA Brontosaurus dinosaur model with a double row of dermal spikes running down the body.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Observant model collectors will have noticed the red flash on the neck of this herbivore.  Palaeontologists believe that these large animals lived in herds and the brightly coloured patch of skin on the throat might have acted as a signalling device in visual displays.  This colouration, along with the double row of dermal spikes is speculative, however, these features on this excellent figure have a grounding in science and reflect what has been deduced about these dinosaurs from their fossils and from studying animals living in herds today.

Several Sauropods in the CollectA Range

The CollectA range “Prehistoric Life” already includes several not to scale models representing Sauropods.  For example, the range contains Cetiosaurus, Shunosaurus, Agustinia, Amargasaurus, Ampelosaurus, Argentinosaurus, Brachiosaurus, Diplodocus, Daxiatitan, Rebbachisaurus, a rearing Rhoetosaurus and an Alamosaurus.  It is great to see a replica of “Thunder Lizard” being added to this collection.

The CollectA “Prehistoric Life” Range Features Several Sauropods

Daxiatitan model by CollectA.

A Daxiatitan replica is amongst numerous Sauropods featured in the extensive CollectA “Prehistoric Life” model range.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Commenting on the impending introduction of a Brontosaurus model, a spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur stated:

“Brontosaurus has had a rather chequered taxonomic career since the genus was first erected in 1879.  For a long time, Brontosaurus was thought to be a junior synonym of Apatosaurus until a substantial review of diplodocid fossils undertaken in 2015 led to the resurrection of the genus”.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s article on this research into the Diplodocidae: The Return of Brontosaurus

Everything Dinosaur Already Has a Fact Sheet on the Closely Related Apatosaurus

Apatosaurus scale drawing.

Scale drawing of Apatosaurus (A. ajax).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We are looking forward to completing our fact sheets as we await the arrival of the new models.

To view the CollectA “Prehistoric Life” models including the Sauropods in stock at Everything Dinosaur: CollectA Prehistoric Life Figures

9 03, 2018

Working to Honour Mary Anning and Mary Leakey

By | March 9th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Famous Figures, Main Page, Press Releases, Teaching|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Helping to Honour Female Scientists

With International Women’s Day having been very much in the news this week, Everything Dinosaur is taking this opportunity to honour two female pioneers in the Earth sciences, both called Mary.  Today, March 9th, is the anniversary of the death of Mary Anning, the famous amateur fossil collector from Dorset who did much to bring the amazing geology of that part of the coast of southern England to the world’s attention.  It is only in the last few decades that her contribution to the nascent science of palaeontology has begun to be recognised.  As part of our continuing work in schools, we have developed a lesson plan based around researching the life of Mary Anning for Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 pupils.

Everything Dinosaur’s Non-chronological Report Focused on Mary Anning

Mary Anning Non-chronological report.

A non-chronological report exercise based on the life and work of Mary Anning.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Non-chronological Report Focused on Mary Anning

A non-chronological report is a non-fiction report that is not written in time order.  Usually written in the third person, these reports help children to practice structuring texts and working with a variety of writing styles.  They involve a planning phase in which the compiler has to research the subject area and to decide what to include or discard.   It helps children to evaluate sources of information, encourages cross-checking of references and provides the opportunity for the teacher to check learning.  Everything Dinosaur’s lesson plan includes a template for the creation of a non-chronological report focused on the life and work of Mary Anning.

Mary Anning Honoured in a Google Doodle

Google celebrates the life and work of Mary Anning.

Google pays tribute to Mary Anning (1799-1847).

Picture Credit: Google/Everything Dinosaur

Mary Douglas Leakey (1913-1996)

The British palaeoanthropologist Mary Leakey, who along with her husband Louis, did much to improve our understanding of the evolution of humankind has also been the subject of a Google doodle.  Everything Dinosaur is working towards honouring the work of this ground-breaking scientists by having a blue plaque erected at her childhood home in London.  We shall update blog readers with regards to our progress in the near future.

A Google Doodle Honouring the Work of Mary Leakey

Mary Leakey honoured by Google.

Celebrating the role of women in science.

Picture Credit: Google/Everything Dinosaur

To read more about the life and work of the remarkable Mary Leakey: Celebrating the Role of Women in Science – Mary Douglas Leakey

8 03, 2018

Straight-Tusked Elephant Model

By | March 8th, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|0 Comments

Eofauna Scientific Research – Straight-tusked Elephant

Eofauna Scientific Research have announced that the next figure to be added to their replica range will be a 1:35 scale replica of a Straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus).  The model is currently in production and it will be available late May, perhaps early June.

The Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked Elephant

Straight-tusked elephant model.

Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus).

Picture Credit: Eofauna Scientific Research

Palaeoloxodon antiquus – A Prehistoric Giant

These large prehistoric elephants ranged across much of southern Europe and the Middle East during the Pleistocene Epoch.  Their fossils have even been found in southern England and several fossil sites record the interaction of hominins with this large proboscidean.  For example, in 2013, Everything Dinosaur published an article summarising research from Southampton University that suggested that the remains of a Straight-tusked elephant found in Kent, could have been hunted and killed by Homo heidelbergensis.  The flints found at the site, along with cut marks preserved on the bones indicated that the carcass was butchered.  Perhaps H. heidelbergensis was capable of bringing down such a large mammal, evidence from elsewhere in Europe would suggest so.  In late 2017, a team of scientists published a paper describing the fossilised remains of a large bull Palaeoloxodon found in Greece that also exhibited evidence of having been butchered by ancient humans (probably H. heidelbergensis).

The Straight-tusked Elephant – It Might Have Been Hunted by Ancient Humans

Straight-tusked elephant model.

Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus).

Picture Credit: Eofauna Scientific Research

Based on Actual Fossil Specimens

Just like the Eofauna Steppe Mammoth replica that proceeded it, the  Palaeoloxodon antiquus figure from Eofauna Scientific Research is based on actual fossil specimens.  Fossils representing three individual animals formed the basis for the sculpt.  The elephant remains that helped to inspire this amazingly detailed model come from the state of Sachsen-Anhalt in central Germany.  Open cast mining in the area has led to the excavation of around seventy individual Palaeoloxodon antiquus specimens.  These remains were preserved in ancient lake deposits and they have enabled scientists to learn a great deal about these ancient herbivores.  Scientists have been able to determine the physical appearance of Palaeoloxodon, how big it was, how much it weighed and to study growth rates.  Fully grown bulls weighed twice as much as the living bush elephant (Loxodonta africana) and just like extant elephants today, the males were much larger than the females.

 Models Based on Actual Fossil Remains

Eofauna models (Steppe Mammoth and Straight-tusked elephant).

The Eofauna Straight-tusked elephant and the Eofauna Steppe mammoth models.

Picture Credit: Eofauna Scientific Research

Everything Dinosaur – A Sneak Peak

Everything Dinosaur team members got the chance to examine this beautiful model a few weeks ago, when we met up with Eofauna Scientific Research staff.  We even took some exclusive pics of the figure so that when the time came, we could provide more photographs of this new addition to the Eofauna range for our customers.

Available Around Late May/Early June from Everything Dinosaur

Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked elephant.

Straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) model.  It comes complete with a data card.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Reserve List for the Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked Elephant Has Been Opened

The Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked elephant is expected to be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in a few weeks (in stock late May or early June).  We shall keep our customers and blog readers updated on production.

In the meantime, we have opened a priority reserve list for the Eofauna Scientific Research Straight-tusked elephant…

To request to be added to our priority reserve list: Email Everything Dinosaur

7 03, 2018

Dinosaurs A Year 1 Art Project

By | March 7th, 2018|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Year 1 Art Project Dinosaurs

Whilst searching through our extensive archives, we came across a photograph taken during one of our many visits to schools to conduct dinosaur and fossil themed workshops.  The children in a Year 1 class at Wellgate Primary have used prehistoric animal drawings to help inspire them in their art classes.  Various dinosaur drawings were used to help the children gain an appreciation of perspective and to learn about the influence of shading on the appearance of a drawing.  How very creative!

Dinosaurs Inspire a Year 1 Art Class

Dinosaur drawings inspire Year 1.

Super dinosaur drawings by a Year 1 class.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Wellgate Primary

Black and White Illustrations

The teacher instructed the children to only use pencil to shade in their drawings and not to add anything else to their illustrations.  This display formed part of an extensive collage that highlighted various painting and drawing styles, all focused on the theme of fossils and prehistoric animals.  Our dinosaur and fossil expert who visited the school to conduct a workshop, took the picture to demonstrate the creative approach to the scheme of work adopted by the teaching team with its cross-curricular touch points clearly evident.

It looks like we have some budding future palaeoartists, all the various pieces of art made a fantastic display.

6 03, 2018

Jinyunpelta sinensis – Oldest Swinger in Town

By | March 6th, 2018|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Basal Ankylosaurine Dinosaur Jinyunpelta is Described

Scientists, including researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences have published details of a new genus of club-tailed, armoured dinosaur that roamed China around 100 million years ago.  The dinosaur has been named Jinyunpelta sinensis, it represents the first definitive ankylosaurid dinosaur from southern China.

An Illustration of the Basal Ankylosaurine Jinyunpelta sinensis

Jinyunpelta sinensis illustrated.

An illustration of Jinyunpelta sinensis.

Picture Credit: The Chinese Academy of Sciences

Two Fossil Specimens

This new dinosaur, very distantly related to Late Cretaceous Ankylosaurs like Euoplocephalus and Ankylosaurus (from which the group is named), has been described based on two fossil specimens.  The fossils come from Jinyun County, Zhejiang Province, China and have been excavated from rocks which form part of the Liangtoutang Formation, which covers the important boundary between Lower and Upper Cretaceous sediments (Albian faunal stage to the Cenomanian faunal stage of the Cretaceous).

The fossil material consists of an almost complete skull, parts of the jaw and postcranial remains including a beautifully-preserved tail club.

The Skull and Jaw of Jinyunpelta sinensis

The skull and mandible of Jinyunpelta sinensis.

Skull and jaw of Jinyunpelta (a) dorsal view, (b) ventral view and (c) anterior view, with accompanying line drawings.

Picture Credit: The Chinese Academy of Sciences/Scientific Reports

The generic name derives from “Jinyun” (Mandarin) honouring Jinyun County where the fossils were found and “pelta” (Latin), a small shield, in reference to the osteoderms found on all ankylosaurians.  The root of the specific name “sin” (Greek) refers to China, the country of origin.

Photographs and Line Drawings of the Spectacular Tail Club

The Tail Club of Jinyunpelta sinensis.

The tail club Jinyunpelta sinensis paratype ZMNH M8963 in dorsal (a) and ventral (b) views.

Picture Credit: The Chinese Academy of Sciences/Scientific Reports

The Oldest Swinger in Town

J. sinensis is described as a basal ankylosaurine dinosaur and it represents the oldest and the most basal ankylosaurian known to have a well-developed tail club knob.  It is quite a sizeable bony club too, getting on for nearly half a metre across at its widest part.  The researchers conclude that large and highly modified tail clubs evolved at the base of the ankylosaurine at least about 100 million years ago.

Jinyunpelta possesses unique cranial features which differentiates this Chinese dinosaur from other armoured dinosaurs known from the northern hemisphere, these autapomorphies support the establishment of a new genus.  Several other types of Ornithischian dinosaur have been reported from this part of China, including another armoured dinosaur – a  Nodosaur and basal Ornithopod that was named and described in 2012 (Yueosaurus tiantaiensis)

The discovery of Jinyunpelta expands the known diversity and palaeogeographical distribution of ankylosaurians in Asia.

The scientific paper: “The Most Basal Ankylosaurine Dinosaur from the Albian–Cenomanian of China, with Implications for the Evolution of the Tail Club” by Wenjie Zheng, Xingsheng Jin, Yoichi Azuma, Qiongying Wang, Kazunori Miyata & Xing Xu published in the open access journal “Scientific Reports”.

5 03, 2018

Watching the Birdie – Early Cretaceous

By | March 5th, 2018|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Palaeontological articles, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Early Cretaceous Enantiornithine Shines Light on Early Bird Evolution

A tiny, beautifully preserved fossil of a baby bird is helping scientists to shine a light on the early evolution of some of the first birds.  The fossil represents an enantiornithine bird and researchers, including Dr Fabien Knoll (Manchester University), have used synchrotron radiation to analyse the microscopic structure of the bird’s skeleton in order to assess at what stage of development the poor creature was at when it met its demise.

An Elemental Map of the Fossilised Skeleton was Created using Synchrotron Radiation

The enantiornithine bird fossil (elemental mapping).

Elemental mapping of the tiny bird fossil.  Mapping the slab and the counter slab of the fossil to determine the chemical composition of the skeleton.

Picture Credit: Manchester University

The Enantiornithes – Early Birds

The Enantiornithes were a clade of diverse Cretaceous birds that possessed several characteristics of modern birds (Neornithines) but were also anatomically different in a number of respects.  They retained claws on their wings and most species had teeth, in contrast to all modern Aves which are edentulous.  Despite having an almost global distribution and being regarded as the most specious and successful birds of the Cretaceous, the Enantiornithes are thought to have become extinct at the same time as the last of the non-avian dinosaurs.

A study published in 2016 proposed that the evolution of a toothless beak may have helped some types of birds to survive the end Cretaceous mass extinction event.  To read an article summarising the study’s findings: Seed Eating May Have Helped Some Birds Survive the End Cretaceous Extinction Event

One of the Smallest Mesozoic Avian Fossils Described

The specimen preserved on a slab and counter slab is one of the smallest Mesozoic bird fossils to have been found to date.  The specimen measures less than five centimetres in length and the baby bird would have been able to sit in an egg-cup.  However, it is remarkably well-preserved and the skeleton is virtually complete and what makes this fossil so significant is the fact that the baby bird died shortly after emerging from its egg.

The poor, unfortunate bird might have had an extremely short life, but it has given researchers a rare opportunity to analyse a baby bird’s bone structure and assess its skeletal development.

A Reconstruction of the Cretaceous Bird

A reconstruction of the baby Cretaceous bird.f

A reconstruction of the enantiornithine baby bird with insert showing scale.

Picture Credit: Raul Martin

Assessing Bone Structure and Development

The scientists have been able to study the ossification of the bones, how they were growing and developing.  A better understanding of the skeleton of the very young bird will help researchers to better understand whether this bird species was capable of flight soon after birth and how independent it was.

Lead author of the study, Dr Fabien Knoll (Interdisciplinary Centre for Ancient Life [ICAL] at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Manchester University) and the ARAID Dinopolis in Spain stated:

“The evolutionary diversification of birds has resulted in a wide range of hatchling developmental strategies and important differences in their growth rates.  By analysing bone development, we can look at a whole host of evolutionary traits.”

Lead Author of the Study Dr Fabien Knoll Prepares the Specimen for Analysis

Dr Knoll (Manchester University) studying the enantiornithine bird fossil.

Dr Fabien Knoll studying the slab and counter slab of the bird fossil.

Picture Credit: Manchester University

Altricial, Precocial or Somewhere in Between

As the fossil was so small, being less than the length of the average person’s little finger, the team used synchrotron radiation to analyse the specimen at a “submicron” level.  The skeleton could be assessed in extreme detail and the microstructures of the bones observed.

Dr Knoll explained:

“New technologies are offering palaeontologists unprecedented capacities to investigate provocative fossils.  Here we made the most of state-of-the-art facilities worldwide including three different synchrotrons in France, the UK and the United States.”

New Technology Helps to Map the Elemental Composition of an Ancient Bird Fossil

Phosphorous mapping and a photograph of the fossil.

A phosphorous map of the bird skeleton and photograph of the fossil.  The fossil is around 127 million years old (Early Cretaceous).

Picture Credit: Manchester University

The synchrotron analysis determined that the baby bird’s sternum (breastplate bone) was largely composed of cartilage and had not completely ossified.  The absence of hard bone in the sternum suggests that this bird could not fly.  The patterns of ossification observed in this and the other few, very young enantiornithine birds known to date also suggest that the developmental strategies of this particular group of ancient avians may have been more diverse than previously thought.

The researchers remain cautious and don’t wish to definitively come down on one side of the argument in terms of how dependent/independent this baby bird could have been.  The lack of bone development does not necessarily prove that the hatchling was reliant on its parents for feeding and care (altricial trait).  Modern birds demonstrate a variety of behavioural responses when it comes to bringing up babies.  Some bird species like chickens and ostriches have highly precocial young.  The babies are able to leave the nest and feed themselves within hours of hatching.  In contrast, most of the passerines (song birds) such as robins, blackbirds and thrushes are helpless when they hatch and rely on their parents to feed them and to keep them warm.

Altricial and precocial behaviours tend to be at opposite ends of a spectrum, the breeding strategy employed by this enantiornithine remains obscure.  As extant Aves exhibit a variety of breeding strategies from totally altricial through to super precocial (such as the megapodes, an example being the Australian brush turkey), it is difficult to clarify the development strategy of any extinct species.

Altricial and Precocial Behaviours can be Viewed as Opposite Ends of a Spectrum

Birds - altricial and precocial behaviours.

Altricial and precocial behaviours in Aves – a spectrum.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Co-author of the study, Luis Chiappe (Los Angeles Museum of Natural History) added:

“This new discovery, together with others from around the world, allows us to peek into the world of ancient birds that lived during the age of dinosaurs.  It is amazing to realise how many of the features we see among living birds had already been developed more than 100 million years ago.”

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of a press release from Manchester University in the compilation of this article.

4 03, 2018

Celebrating 4,000 Blog Posts

By | March 4th, 2018|Adobe CS5, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Reaches Landmark of 4,000 Blog Posts

Team members at Everything Dinosaur are celebrating the landmark of having achieved 4,000 blog posts.  Since our first article was posted up in May 2007, a lot has happened in the world of palaeontology and the Earth sciences in general.  We have done our best to update readers on these exciting developments, covering news stories, fossil discoveries, new dinosaurs, updates on extinction theories, breakthroughs in the use of research technologies and so much more.  For model collectors and dinosaur fans, we have seen entire ranges come and go and just like the study of the Dinosauria, which is often thought of being in a golden age of discovery, so collectors of models seem to be in a golden age when it comes to prehistoric animal replicas and figures.

Everything Dinosaur Celebrates Posting Up 4,000 Blog Articles

4,000 articles on the Everything Dinosaur blog.

Everything Dinosaur celebrates posting up 4,000 blog articles.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our First Thank You

A very big thank you to all the researchers, press officers, undergraduates, university professors, field team members, media companies, professional palaeontologists, dedicated fossil collectors, teachers, manufacturers, scientists and prehistoric animal fans who have shared stories with us so that we can post them up on this weblog.  We really do appreciate all the help and assistance that we have had along the way.

Our Iguanodon Gives Everyone a Big Thumbs Up!

 

Iguanodon thumbs up!

Praise from a dinosaur!  A big thank you to all our contributors and to our readers.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our Second Thank You

Also, a very big thank you to all our readers, feedback providers, reviewers, commentators, email senders, letter writers, picture takers and so forth that have helped keep our blog so fresh, vibrant and diverse.  We will continue to strive to bring you updates on research, information on new discoveries and photographs of fossils and other amazing wonders.  Next week’s blog postings are already in place, we can’t give too much away at this time as a number of them have embargoes, but what we can say is that the next few posts will reflect the aims and objectives of our weblog, to educate, inform and indulge fans of dinosaurs and prehistoric animals.

One article scheduled for release next week has been written with the co-operation of the University of Manchester, it covers research into an aspect of Cretaceous Theropod behaviour.  Another article prepared and ready for adding in the next few days has been compiled in collaboration with Eofauna Scientific Research, we will be announcing the next prehistoric animal figure in this exciting, new model range.  We will also be posting up some exclusive photographs of the new Eofauna Scientific Research model.

Wonder what exciting scientific developments, discoveries and new products we will be covering in the next 1,000 posts?

3 03, 2018

Schleich New Models for 2018 (July)

By | March 3rd, 2018|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Schleich New Models for 2018 (July)

At the end of last month, Everything Dinosaur posted up information summarising the retirements from the Schleich range of prehistoric animal models.  The Germany-based figure and replica manufacturer has announced a number of retirements and several dinosaur models are now out of production.  However, Schleich has already introduced five new figures into their “Dinosaurs”* range in 2018 and Everything Dinosaur is aware of plans to add a further three models in the summer.

“Dinosaurs”* – the prehistoric animal figures produced by Schleich come under the sub-brand of “Dinosaurs” although this part of their range also includes several non-dinosaurs such as Dunkleosteus, the new for 2018 Dinogorgon (see picture below) and Dimetrodon.  The exact taxonomic position of Herrerasaurus remains controversial but for the time being we include this Triassic carnivore within the Theropod dinosaur Suborder.

Five New Schleich Figures Were Introduced in Early 2018

New Schleich prehistoric animals (2018).

New Schleich prehistoric animal models (2018).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To read Everything Dinosaur’s recent article about Schleich retirements: Prehistoric Animal Model Retirements from Schleich

Three New Large Prehistoric Animal Figures for Summer 2018

As stated previously on this blog, Schleich intend to bring out three large prehistoric animal figures in the summer of 2018.  We are expecting our first deliveries around July, the models could arrive a little earlier, perhaps a little later, but three new Schleich replicas are expected in the summer.

The Schleich Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex

Schleich T. rex juvenile.

Schleich Tyrannosaurus rex juvenile.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Schleich will also be bringing out a juvenile Therizinosaurus, with a similar colouration to the red/black adult Therizinosaurus figure that was introduced a few weeks ago.

The Schleich Juvenile Therizinosaurus Figure Due Out in Summer 2018

Schleich juvenile Therizinosaurus.

Schleich juvenile Therizinosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Schleich juvenile Therizinosaurus looks a very fearsome beast indeed.  There may also be a number of colour variants of existing Schleich models introduced, a blue coloured Psittacosaurus and a sandy coloured Herrerasaurus for example, if we get further information from Schleich about product developments we will post it up on this blog and on our social media platforms to help keep all our customers informed.

The third figure due to be introduced next summer is a colourful Pteranodon.  Schleich will be adding to their Pterosaur portfolio by adding a Pteranodon longiceps figure to their range.   This is good news as the future of the “World of History” Quetzalcoatlus looks uncertain and this model may well be retired.

The Schleich Pteranodon Model – Close-up View of the Head

Schleich Pteranodon replica.

Schleich Pteranodon model.  Due to be flying high in the summer of 2018.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Schleich Quetzalcoatlus Model – Heading for Extinction?

Schleich Quetzalcoatlus model.

The Schleich Quetzalcoatlus model due for retirement?

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Schleich Quetzalcoatlus (pictured above), was introduced in 2011, the bizarre wing markings caused a bit of a “flap” when it was first introduced and many collectors and model fans commented that the “Saurus” Quetzalcoatlus (pictured below), had more realistic wings.  If the Quetzalcoatlus figure is withdrawn, then perhaps Schleich will consider adding a new flying reptile model to its range over the next couple of years or so.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s original 2011 article about the arrival of a controversial Quetzalcoatlus figure: Schleich Quetzalcoatlus Causing a Flap

The “Saurus” Quetzalcoatlus Figure

Schleich "Saurus" Quetzalcoatlus model.

A more conventional Pterosaur model?

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of Schleich prehistoric animal figures available from Everything Dinosaur: Schleich Prehistoric Animal Models

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2 03, 2018

Snow and Ice Affecting Deliveries

By | March 2nd, 2018|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Bad Weather in the UK – Delays with Deliveries

Currently much of the UK is experiencing severe weather conditions.  Snow and icy conditions are affecting much of Scotland, East Anglia, Yorkshire, the Pennines, north-eastern England, the south-west and south-eastern England.  This prolonged period of cold weather has led to the cancellation of many trains and the road network, including several major roads, has been very badly disrupted.  Driving conditions are described as treacherous for many parts of the United Kingdom and we at Everything Dinosaur are aware that the weather has caused widespread transport chaos.

Deep Snow Covers Much of the UK and More Snow is Forecast

Heavy snow falls.

Heavy snow falls across much of the UK causing disruption.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Impact on Deliveries/Collections

The severe weather is having a deleterious effect on parcel deliveries and collection services.  Everything Dinosaur has been informed that courier services in parts of the country are likely to be very badly affected with a temporary suspension of some deliveries and collections.  The safety of the drivers is paramount and whilst we are aware that the courier companies will do their best to operate as normal, we do appreciate that due to the bad weather, some services such as next day delivery may not be possible in parts of the UK for the time being.

Dinosaur Deliveries in the Snow Can Be Difficult

Everything Dinosaur's "dino van" covered in snow.

A dinosaur van covered in snow.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Whilst our dedicated team members continue to pack and process orders as quickly as they can, we do appreciate that delivery delays are likely to occur.  We advise all our customers to allow extra time for deliveries, purchasing a couple of days early can make all the difference.”

International Deliveries Affected

Several international airports such as Glasgow and Dublin have been closed due to heavy snow.  This has affected flights and as such, our international customers may find delays in deliveries too.  Everything Dinosaur has implemented contingency plans to help minimise the disruption to our packing and despatch of orders.  We have put in place arrangements to assist with the prompt collection of parcels from our premises and team members have ensured that orders placed by 2.30pm yesterday afternoon for first class or second class delivery by Royal Mail, have already been sent out.

The Arrival of Stock at Everything Dinosaur’s Warehouse

The Everything Dinosaur warehouse remains open, but there may be delays in shipments/deliveries reaching our warehouse due to the severe weather.  Contingency plans are in place to help minimise the impact of this period of very bad weather on deliveries into our own warehouse.

Everything Dinosaur team members urge customers to try and place orders early to help give delivery companies more time in the current severe weather conditions.

We will continue to monitor the situation and update you as and when necessary.

Be safe, stay warm.

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