All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
//December
6 12, 2017

Thornton Triceratops is Actually Torosaurus

By | December 6th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Triceratops Skeleton Turns Out to be Torosaurus

A partial, horned dinosaur skeleton, initially thought to represent a young adult Triceratops has been reassessed following a month of preparation and cleaning and identified as a Torosaurus (T. latus).  It was back in September that Everything Dinosaur first reported on the dinosaur fossil discovery in Thornton, Colorado (USA).  Sadly, the highly respected Denver Museum of Nature and Science palaeontologist, Mike Getty was taken ill at the dig site and passed away shortly afterwards.

Turns out, what was initially identified as a Triceratops has proved incorrect.  As the Denver Museum of Nature and Science preparators have worked on the fossil bones, they have uncovered enough material to confidently ascribe the fossils to the closely related, but much rarer Torosaurus latus.

An Illustration of the Horned Dinosaur Torosaurus latus

Torosaurus illustrated.

An illustration of Torosaurus latus (Sergey Krasovskiy).

Picture Credit: Sergey Krasovskiy

Triceratops and Torosaurus

Analysis of the large head shield that projects backwards from the skull has shown the frill of bone to be quite thin, with two distinct large holes (fenestrae), anatomical traits that are associated with Torosaurus and not Triceratops.  The new diagnosis was made after a careful comparative study using Triceratops specimens already within the Museum’s vertebrate fossil collection.  Torosaurus fossils are exceptionally scarce.  There are several thousand Triceratops (T. horridus and T. prorsus) fossils, representing something like 2,000 individuals.  In contrast, there are approximately 7 partial skulls of Torosaurus known.

A Skeletal Drawing Showing the Extent of the Fossil Material Found at the Thornton Site

Thornton Triceratops turns out to be a Torosaurus.

The yellow parts of the skeleton represent those elements of the Torosaurus found.

Picture Credit: Denver Museum of Nature and Science

A spokesperson for Everything Dinosaur commented:

“The fossil find at Thornton is highly significant.  The majority of the front-end of the individual has been excavated including an almost complete skull.  This specimen may provide palaeontologists with valuable information on how Torosaurus changed as it grew up.  In addition, these fossils could help to identify other Torosaurus specimens in museums that have been misidentified and labelled as Triceratops.”

Is Torosaurus Just a Very Old Triceratops?

The lack of Torosaurus fossil material compared to other horned dinosaurs from North America, led to speculation that Torosaurus was not a valid genus, that the fossil material ascribed to Torosaurus actually represented very old, very mature examples of Triceratops.  The Thornton specimen seems to represent a young adult animal, this may help to clarify the Torosaurus versus Triceratops debate.

To read an article published in 2010, that details an American study that suggested that Torosaurus fossils were actually Triceratops: The Extinction of Torosaurus – Second Time Around

Fossilised Bones Being Exposed at the Thornton Dig Site

The fossils of Torosaurus (T. latus).

Parts of the skeleton are exposed (Torosaurus latus).

Picture Credit: Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Joe Sertich (Curator of Dinosaurs at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science), stated:

“Not only is the fossil more complete and better preserved than I imagined, but it has also revealed itself to be something extremely rare.  The Thornton beast is by far the most complete, and best preserved, ever found.”

Nicknamed “Tiny”

The specimen has been nicknamed “Tiny”, but the work of preparing and studying these fossils is no small task.  The material was unearthed at a Saunders Construction site for a new Public Safety Facility.  Cleaning efforts have also revealed several more skull bones and a complete tibia (lower leg bone).  An estimated 95 percent of the skull and at least 20 percent of the skeleton have now been identified, making this the most complete Cretaceous-aged fossil discovered in Colorado.

Visitors to the Museum can observe the fossil preparation process in the Fossil Prep Laboratory, cleaning and preparing is estimated to take several more months.

Joe Sertich at the Dig Site Working on “Tiny” the Torosaurus

Excavating an Torosaurus.

Joe Sertich, curator of dinosaurs, (Denver Museum of Nature and Science) at the dig site (Thornton, Colorado).

Picture Credit: Denver Museum of Nature and Science

We wonder what Mike Getty would have made of it all?

To read more about the sad death of renowned scientist Mike Getty: Highly Respected Palaeontologist Dies at Dig Site

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the assistance of the press team at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science in the compilation of this article.

5 12, 2017

The Archaeopteryx That Wasn’t

By | December 5th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Ostromia crassipes – The First European Member of the Anchiornithidae

The first fossil of Archaeopteryx to have been discovered, turns out not to represent the “Urvogel” at all.  In a reassessment of the fossil, known as the Haarlem specimen, as it is part of the vertebrate collection housed at the Teylers Museum in Haarlem (Holland), it has been re-described as a small predatory dinosaur belonging to the anchiornithid family.  The dinosaur has been named Ostromia crassipes, the genus name honours the late John Ostrom, who identified the Haarlem specimen as a Theropod and was instrumental in the work that led to the definition of dinosaurs as dynamic, active reptiles.

The Haarlem Specimen – the Holotype of Ostromia crassipes

Ostromia crassipes holotype fossil.

The holotype fossil of Ostromia crassipes, previously thought to represent Archaeopteryx.

Picture Credit: Oliver Rauhut/Ludwig-Maximilians-University (Munich, Germany)

The fossil studied, actually consists of two parts, the counterslab TM 6929 (left) and the main slab (right) TM 6928.

Archaeopteryx was named in 1861, however, the Haarlem specimen was found four years earlier.  To date, around a dozen specimens have been assigned to the Archaeopteryx genus, including a single, fossilised feather.  The discovery of Archaeopteryx supported the theory of natural selection proposed by Darwin and Wallace as it represented a transitional form between reptiles and birds.  Archaeopteryx fossils support the idea that modern birds are descendants of carnivorous dinosaurs.

Writing in the academic journal “BMC Evolutionary Biology”, palaeontologists Oliver Rauhut and Christian Foth from the Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde in Stuttgart have re-examined the Haarlem specimen.  They conclude that this fossil differs in several important respects from the other known representatives of the genus Archaeopteryx.  The researchers conclude that the fossil is not an Archaeopteryx at all, but a representative of the very bird-like maniraptoran dinosaurs known as anchiornithids.

These crow-sized, predatory dinosaurs possessed feathers on all four limbs, and they predate the appearance of Archaeopteryx by several million years.

Commenting on their study, Dr Oliver Rauhut stated:

“The Haarlem fossil is the first member of this group found outside China and together with Archaeopteryx, it is only the second species of bird-like dinosaur from the Jurassic discovered outside eastern Asia.  This makes it [the Haarlem specimen] even more of a rarity than the true specimens of Archaeopteryx.”

Subtle Anatomical Differences and Bone Osteology

The scientists looked at the relative proportions of limb, toe and finger bones and noted that the Haarlem material (TM 6929 and TM 6928), was different from other Archaeopteryx specimens.  In addition, it had affinities with the fossilised remains of Anchiornis from China.  Furthermore, differences in bone osteology were observed.  For example, the Haarlem fossil specimen has a regular, well-developed longitudinal furrow on the exposed medial side of the preserved manual phalanx, this furrow is not present on any of the finger bones ascribed to Archaeopteryx.

Comparing the Finger Bones (Manual Phalanges) of Various Theropods

Theropod manual phalanges comparison.

Comparison of Theropod finger bones in highly compacted sediments.  Scale bar in mm.

Picture Credit: BMC Evolutionary Biology

The photograph (above) shows close-up views of the finger bones (manual phalanges) of several Theropods, analysis of the shape of the bones, their features and their proportions led the researchers to conclude that the Haarlem specimen was not Archaeopteryx.

(a).  the right manus (hand) of the Thermopolis specimen of Archaeopteryx

(b). the right manus of the Solnhofen specimen of Archaeopteryx

(c). the left manus of the juvenile Theropod from Germany Sciurumimus albersdoerferi (image resolved under UV light)

(d). the second finger of the small Late Jurassic Theropod Compsognathus longipes

(e).  the impression from the first finger of the anchiornithid Anchiornis huxleyi

(f). the first finger of Caudipteryx, a feathered Theropod from the Early Cretaceous of China

Learning About Fauna of the Solnhofen Archipelago

Discovered in 1857, the Haarlem fossil specimen was found about 6 miles (10 kilometres), to the north-east of the closest Archaeopteryx locality known (Schamhaupten) which is near the town of Altmannstein in southern Bavaria.  The Jurassic-aged rocks in this area were laid down in a shallow sea, in which were scattered numerous small islands, an archipelago, that provided an environment, superficially similar to that of the Caribbean today.  These islands that once covered southern Bavaria, are known as the Solnhofen archipelago, the region from which all known specimens of the genus Archaeopteryx come from.  The taxonomic reassignment of the Haarlem specimen to the feathered Anchiornithidae has provided a fresh insight into the evolution of the Avialae and indicates that the first bird-like dinosaurs originated in Asia.  During the Middle to the Late Jurassic these creatures migrated westwards, reaching the Solnhofen archipelago of Western Europe some 150 million years ago.

The Haarlem fossil was originally recovered from what was then the eastern end of the archipelago, quite close to the mainland.  Unlike Archaeopteryx, anchiornithids were (most likely), unable to fly, and might not have been able to reach the more remote islands offshore.   All true fossils of Archaeopteryx found to date were recovered from the lithographic limestone strata further to the west, closer to the open sea.  This implies that dinosaurs like Ostromia may have been limited in their distribution, compared to the volant Archaeopteryx.

Faunal Distribution in the Solnhofen Archipelago (Late Jurassic)

The Solnhofen archipelago and Ostromia/Archaeopteryx distribution.

The researchers speculate that the flightless Ostromia could not have reached the islands furthermost from the mainland whilst Archaeopteryx with its powered flight capability was able to reach outlying islands.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In the diagram above, Ostromia may have been unable to reach the more remote parts of the island chain whilst Archaeopteryx, which was capable of powered flight (its aerial abilities are still debated), would have been more able to “island hop”.

Based on these new findings, the researchers postulate that other known Archaeopteryx fossils may need reassessment.

Dr Rauhut suggests:

“Not every bird-like fossil that turns up in the fine-grained limestones around Solnhofen need necessarily be a specimen of Archaeopteryx,”

The scientific paper: “Re-evaluation of the Haarlem Archaeopteryx and the Radiation of Maniraptoran Theropod Dinosaurs” by Christian Foth and Oliver W. M. Rauhut published in BMC Evolutionary Biology.

An article on Archaeopteryx research: Archaeopteryx Had Feathered “Trousers”

The oldest Archaeopteryx fossil: The Oldest Archaeopteryx in Town?

4 12, 2017

Everything Dinosaur 5-Star Rating

By | December 4th, 2017|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Top Marks from Feefo for Everything Dinosaur

Despite being exceptionally busy, what with the Christmas rush and plans for new model introductions, Everything Dinosaur has continued to maintain our five-star customer service rating with Feefo.  Hundreds of customer reviews have now been received and the UK-based dinosaur company continues to consistently achieve the highest customer satisfaction rating.

Everything Dinosaur Earns a 5-Star Rating from Feefo

Top marks from Feefo for Everything Dinosaur.

Everything Dinosaur 5-stars on Feefo.

Picture Credit: Feefo/Everything Dinosaur

With an overall product rating at 4.8 (96%), Everything Dinosaur’s products and customer service continues to set the pace.

Collecting feedback is an excellent way of engaging with our customers and helps to build trust amongst those browsers visiting Everything Dinosaur’s website for the first time.  Each review is genuine and independently verified by the team at Feefo, one of the world’s most respected review and rating companies.

Some of Our Latest Reviews

Stefano from Italy wrote:

“Perfetto!  Rivenditore serio e con prezzi convenienti.”  This translates as “perfect!   A serious dealer with reasonable prices.”

Michael (United States) said:

“Everything Dinosaur!  A wonderful place for all your dino needs!  I love this company!  I am a huge dinosaur enthusiast and this website is excellent.  The customer service is very professional and courteous and I look forward to my next purchase.”

Dorte from Denmark commented:

“Excellent.  I needed a Sabre-tooth Tiger for my grandchildren but could not find anyone in Denmark.  Then I found Everything Dinosaur.  Wonderful place.  They had everything the children needed.  I ordered 7 animals and they are gorgeous.  With the animals you get papers telling all what is known about it and we even got drawings to colour.  My best recommendation.”

Everything Dinosaur is not only impressing international customers, we have our own home-grown supporters too.

For example, Julie from Cumbria wrote:

“Brilliant personal service.  Easy to navigate website, kept informed at each stage of the order, fast delivery service, packaged well and loved the information included.”

Jodie said in her Feefo review:

“Fantastic service!  Personalised emails telling me when the items would be posted.  Received really fast, no issues with anything at all.  Will use again.”

Five-Star Customer Service from Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur 5-star Feefo rating.

5-star rating for Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Feefo/Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur added:

“We are very grateful for all the feedback that we receive and we are delighted to hear that our dedication and enthusiasm has been acknowledged by our customers in such a generous way.  Our thanks to everyone who takes the time to complete a Feefo review.”

To see what all the fuss is about, check out Everything Dinosaur’s website here: Everything Dinosaur for the full list of Feefo reviews just click on the tab that appears towards the right of the screen on our website pages.

3 12, 2017

Dromaeosaurid Drawing

By | December 3rd, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Dromaeosaurid Drawing

As Everything Dinosaur prepares for the introduction of the Beasts of the Mesozoic 1:6 scale range of model raptors, we are busy compiling fact sheets on all the new figures.  A series of dromaeosaurid and related Maniraptora drawings have been commissioned.  These illustrations will be used to show the approximate size of each of the prehistoric animals represented by a Beasts of the Mesozoic figure.

A Typical Member of the Dromaeosaurids – A Dromaeosaurid Drawing

Maniraptor illustration (dromaeosaurid).

Dromaeosaurid drawing for Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Feathered Friends

We aim to have all the fact sheets finished by the middle of January, in plenty of time for the launch of this range.  The above illustration shows the typical bauplan of a dromaeosaurid, note the addition of a feathery coat and a large fan of feathers on the end of the long tail.  The family Dromaeosauridae is very diverse, geographically widespread and with a wide temporal range.  The term “Dromaeosaur” means “running lizard”, all the dromaeosaurids were bipedal and in all likelihood, fast runners.

Distantly related to modern birds, we shall try not to get in a flap as we compile the dozen or so fact sheets that we need.

Coming to Everything Dinosaur in 2018 the “Beasts of the Mesozoic Range”

Beasts of the Mesozoic Deluxe 1:6 scale "Raptors".

The Deluxe Raptors in the Beasts of the Mesozoic range coming to Everything Dinosaur in 2018.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

2 12, 2017

Hamipterus Nesting Ground Discovery

By | December 2nd, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Pterosaurs Even More Like Birds

Pterosaurs like birds, were capable of powered flight.  It seems that command of the skies is not the only thing that these two types of vertebrate had in common.  Thanks to a remarkable series of discoveries from the remote Turpan-Hami Basin located in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (north-western China), palaeontologists have learned that Pterosaurs, like many living birds nested in colonies, that they had preferred nesting sites and when young, Pterosaurs needed a degree of parental care, just like many species of birds today.

Pterosaur Nesting Colony (Hamipterus tianshanensis)

Hamipterus tianshanensis nesting ground.

Male (right) and female Hamipterus tianshanensis looking after their brood, whilst more Pterosaur chicks hatch in the foreground.

Picture Credit: Zhao Chuang

Hundreds of Pterosaur Eggs Discovered

Writing in the journal “Science”, researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences along with collaborators from a number of research institutions in Brazil have published a paper describing the discovery of 215 Pterosaur eggs, 16 of which contain the remains of embryos.  The eggs and the numerous fossil bones associated with the site have been attributed to Hamipterus tianshanensis, a flying reptile first named and described in 2014 whose exact taxonomic position in the Pterosaur family tree remains open to debate.

That point notwithstanding, H. tianshanensis has been propelled to super-stardom, like a Pteranodon taking to the air, representing one of the most significant Pterosauria discoveries made to date.

An Assemblage of Pterosaur Fossils

Hamipterus tianshanensis fossils including eggs and embryos.

Pterosaur fossil eggs and bones representing individuals of various ages.

Picture Credit: Xinhua/Wang Xiaolin

Pterosaur Nesting Grounds

Significantly, the number of eggs discovered are far too many to have been laid by a single female.  This suggests that these flying reptiles nested in colonies and furthermore, the overlaying of multiple clutches of eggs indicates that Pterosaurs, like many birds today, returned to the same nesting sites each year.  As the authors conclude, “the similarity between these groups goes beyond wings”.

The Remains of Numerous Individuals at the Site

Hamipterus fossil remains.

Hundreds of Pterosaur bones lying on the surface.  Note the tip of a geological hammer providing a scale.

Picture Credit: Xinhua/Alexander Kellner

Three-Dimensional Fossil Egg Preservation

The eggs were not laid at the location where they were discovered.  This exceptional Lagerstätte preserves a series of tragic events, it seems that periodically, the nesting area was subjected to flooding as a result of seasonal storms.  Many of the eggs have been preserved in three dimensions, caused by the encroachment of sediment.  Computed tomography scans have revealed minute details of some of the embryos preserved within the eggs.  For example, an almost complete skeleton of a hatchling shows that bones related to flight were less developed than bones of the hind limb, indicating that new-borns might have been able to walk but not fly.   The front limb bones lack ossification and had yet to fully form, whilst the leg bones such as the femora are well developed.  This suggests that the young Pterosaurs were unable to fly, but not completely helpless, their strong legs would have meant that they would not have been stuck in the nest but quite capable of locomotion.  However, these new insights have led the palaeontologists to conclude that, in the case of Hamipterus at least, the offspring were less precocious than previously assumed.

In short, mum and dad (coming to that bit next), had to take care of their young, bring food to them and protect them from predators.

Evidence Suggests that Pterosaurs Cared for their Young

Hamipterus feeding their young.

The male Hamipterus (background) stands guard whilst the female regurgitates food to her offspring (altricial behaviours in Pterosaurs).

Picture Credit: Zhao Chuang

The Significance of Dad

Hamipterus tianshanensis was named and described three years ago.  This fossil location had been discovered several years before, but the Pterosaur body fossils and the associated Pterosaur egg material (forty specimens and five eggs), were not scientifically described until 2014.  In the 2014 paper (Wang et al), which was written by many of the scientists involved in this latest study, it was postulated that differences in head crest shape or size helped to distinguish males from females.  It was proposed that specimens with larger skull crests were males.  This suggests sexual dimorphism in this species and, if this idea is taken a little further, it implies that the males may have played a role in helping to bring up the next generation. After all, fossilised remains of what might represent adult males have been swept together with the nest site fossils.  Many male birds share parental responsibilities and lots of extant Aves such as the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) for instance, pair for life.  Perhaps, adult Pterosaurs also had monogamous behaviour.

A Close-up View of the Preserved Leathery Egg of Hamipterus

Egg fossils (Pterosaur).

Pterosaur egg fossils (Hamipterus tianshanensis).

Picture Credit: Xinhua/Wang Xiaolin

Inferring Behaviours

To what degree the Pterosauria and Aves share behaviours remains a controversial area.  Further research into the remarkable Hamipterus Lagerstätte has greatly increased our knowledge about flying reptiles but we must be careful not to infer or imply too much from the fossil evidence.  The scientists conclude that the discovery of all these bones and fossilised eggs supports the idea that these Pterosaurs nested in colonies and that they returned to a favoured nesting site to breed.

Two of the Authors of the Scientific Paper Inspect Part of the Remote Dig Site

Collecting egg fossil specimens (Pterosaur).

Palaeontologists Wang Xiaolin (right) and Alexander Kellner collect specimens in a desert in Hami, northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

Picture Credit: Xinhua

The scientific paper: “Egg Accumulation with 3D Embryos Provides Insight into the Life History of a Pterosaur” by Xiaolin Wang, Alexander W. A. Kellner, Shunxing Jiang, Xin Cheng, Qiang Wang, Yingxia Ma, Yahefujiang Paidoula, Taissa Rodrigues, He Chen, Juliana M. Sayão, Ning Li, Jialiang Zhang, Renan A. M. Bantim, Xi Meng, Xinjun Zhang, Rui Qiu and Zhonghe Zhou published in the journal “Science”.

1 12, 2017

Everything Dinosaur Gets Exclusive Access to Beasts of the Mesozoic Range

By | December 1st, 2017|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|2 Comments

Everything Dinosaur will be Stocking the Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptor range in 2018

Everything Dinosaur will be stocking in early 2018, the Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptor series.  The UK-based specialist supplier of dinosaur and prehistoric animal models has been granted exclusive access to this exciting 1:6 scale model range.  No need for collectors and prehistoric animal fans to get their feathers in a flap, these amazing, highly-detailed and scientifically accurate feathered dinosaurs will be available on this side of the Atlantic.

The Range of 1:6 Scale Deluxe “Raptor” Figures Coming to Everything Dinosaur in Early 2018

Beasts of the Mesozoic Deluxe 1:6 scale "Raptors".

The Deluxe Raptors in the Beasts of the Mesozoic range coming to Everything Dinosaur in 2018.

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptor series consists of 15 deluxe Maniraptora models, including Dromaeosaurus albertensis, Saurornitholestes langstoni, Balaur bondoc and of course, Velociraptor mongoliensis, all skilfully designed and sculptured by the highly-respected David Silva of Creative Beast Studio.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“This is great news for collectors.  David Silva has done a brilliant job producing what will be a highly sought after and very collectable model range, all backed by Everything Dinosaur’s formidable reputation for customer service.”

Accessory Packs will also be Stocked Including the Superb Desert Scene Featuring Mononykus

Desert Accessory Pack (Beasts of the Mesozoic)

The amazing desert accessory pack featuring a replica Mononykus (Beasts of the Mesozoic).  For serious model collectors!

Coming to the UK in Early 2018

The first shipment of figures is due to arrive at Everything Dinosaur’s warehouse in February, although sources close to the company have stated that models could be in stock as early as January 2018.

Everything Dinosaur will also be bringing in the beautiful accessory packs that feature the likes of Microraptor and Troodon.  Thanks to David’s creative skills, there will even be a range of “raptor nestlings” with three different types of plumage available.

“Raptor” Nestlings with Colourful Plumage

For serious collectors Beasts of the Mesozoic nestling raptors.

A set of three “raptor” nestlings (amber) part of the Beasts of the Mesozoic range.

With Everything Dinosaur on board, the Creative Beast Studio team can accelerate their development plans for future dinosaur models.  The spirit of transatlantic co-operation is already evident, with Everything Dinosaur providing helpful data sheets to assist Creative Beast Studio staff as they plan a new range of horned dinosaur replicas, whilst facts and useful information that inspired the Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptor series has been heading over to the UK.

David Silva (Creative Beast Studio) stated:

“We are immensely proud of the Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptors.  We want to create a range of scientifically accurate dinosaur figures that really does reflect the fossil evidence.  It is fantastic to be teaming up with such a well-respected company such as Everything Dinosaur, who like us, share a passion for prehistoric animals.”

The Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptor Series

This stunning model series highlights the amazing variety of feathered, meat-eating dinosaurs that once roamed our planet.  Each of the deluxe Raptors has 26 points of articulation, realistic detail and movement, all based on the latest scientific discoveries and is supplied complete with its own custom-made display base.

The Stunning Fan’s Choice Saurornitholestes langstoni will be Available from Everything Dinosaur in 2018

Saurornitholestes langstoni (Beasts of the Mesozoic).

Saurornitholestes langstoni 1:6 scale figure. A great replica for discerning collectors.

Thanks to Everything Dinosaur and the Creative Beast Studio, collectors have the opportunity to build up their own collection of highly accurate, museum quality figures.

Aimed at Dinosaur Figure Collectors from 14 Years Upwards

Zhenyuanlong suni packaging (Beasts of the Mesozoic).

The beautiful Zhenyuanlong suni in its packaging (Beasts of the Mesozoic).

Beasts of the Mesozoic Raptors will be flocking your way very soon…

To request more information about the Beasts of the Mesozoic range: Email Everything Dinosaur

Load More Posts