All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
//September
22 09, 2016

Paleo-Creatures Range at Everything Dinosaur

By | September 22nd, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Paleo-Creatures Models Available from Everything Dinosaur

The Paleo-Creatures range of hand-crafted, scale model prehistoric animals created by talented Spanish artist and designer Jesús Toledo is now available from Everything Dinosaur.  These unique, polyurethane scale replicas are all hand-painted with the finest quality acrylic paints and each one makes a fantastic piece for any model collector.

The Beautifully Crafted Paleo-Creatures Range of Prehistoric Animal Models

Paleo_Creatures prehistoric animal models.

The wide range of Paleo-Creatures replicas.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Paleo-Creatures

To view the range of Paleo-Creatures prehistoric animal replicas available from Everything Dinosaur: The Paleo-Creatures Range of Prehistoric Animal Replicas

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We are delighted to introduce the Paleo-Creatures range to our customers.  Each carefully crafted replica is unique and we have admired the work of Jesús Toledo for a while now.  This range features amazing ancient creatures such as the awesome anomalocarid Aegirocassis and the spectacular Koolasuchus model, it is great to see an artist introducing scale replicas of some of the more unusual creatures that once roamed our planet.”

A Wide Range of Prehistoric Animal Models

The Paleo-Creatures range includes a number of models representing animals not covered in other mainstream product ranges, for example, there is a model of the bizarre Triassic marine reptile Atopodentatus and the incredible “Tully Monster” (Tullimonstrum gregarium), whose fossils are known from just one place in the world – the Mazon Creek fossil beds of Illinois, United States.

The “Tully Monster” – Tullimonstrum gregarium Paleo-Creatures Replica

The Paleo-Creatures "Tully Monster" model.

The Paleo-Creatures Tullimonstrum replica.

Picture Credit: Paleo-Creatures

Very little is known about the very strange “Tully Monster”, it was only recently that palaeontologists were able to classify this animal to a Phylum.  To read an article about the classification of Tullimonstrum: “Tully Monster” Riddle Solved.

 Eotyrannus, Concavenator, Kosmoceratops and Other Dinosaur Models

The Paleo-Creatures portfolio also includes a number of dinosaur models including the Theropods Concavenator and Eotyrannus.  Everything Dinosaur will be adding more dinosaurs shortly, new models as well as the likes of the beautiful Dilophosaurus dinosaur replica.  Look out for new Paleo-Creatures replicas coming into stock.

The Superb Torvosaurus Dinosaur Model Available From Everything Dinosaur

The Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus dinosaur model.

The Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Paleo-Creatures

Spanish artist  Jesús Toledo is already working on a number of exciting additions to the Paleo-Creatures portfolio.  His skilfully crafted models and replicas have already built up a strong reputation amongst model fans and dinosaur enthusiasts and Everything Dinosaur team members look forward to posting up more pictures of some of the forthcoming attractions in this rapidly expanding model range.

21 09, 2016

A Photograph of a Trilobite Fossil

By | September 21st, 2016|Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils, Teaching|0 Comments

A Trilobite Fossil

We were contacted by a teacher to help explain how Trilobite fossils formed, how old they were and what Trilobites actually looked like.  We were happy to email over a fact sheet all about the Trilobita and to send over some pictures of Trilobite reconstructions along with some photographs of fossils.

A Photograph of a Trilobite Fossil

A fossil of an Trilobite.

A beautiful Trilobite fossil.

We received a lovely email in return thanking us for providing such a lot of useful teaching material and for being so responsive.  The fossil above shows the headshield (cephalon) and the trunk but the tail-piece (pygidium) is missing.  We are not sure what family of Trilobita this fossil comes from.  As Trilobites shed their exoskeletons in order to grow (moulting), most Trilobite fossils are actually shed shells, rather than the corpses of dead animals.  Whatever the species, we are always keen to see pictures of Trilobites and we were happy to help out the teacher.

20 09, 2016

Quotes from Confucius (Confuciusornithiformes et al)

By | September 20th, 2016|Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page|0 Comments

An Appropriate Quotation from Confucius

As Everything Dinosaur team members are currently running around the country delivering lots of dinosaur and prehistoric animal themed workshops in schools, we hardly have time to pause for breath let alone appreciate how lucky we are to have such fantastic jobs.  A colleague came across this wonderful quotation, attributed to the great Chinese teacher and philosopher Confucius, who, coincidentally, was born in this month (September), but some 2,567 years ago.

Confucius said:

“Choose a job that you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

That’s something that we will have to remember as we whizz from school to school.  Wise words indeed and from a sage who also had a species of Early Cretaceous bird named after him (Confuciusornis sanctus).  In fact, not only does Confucius have the prestige of a genus name but a whole Order of ancient prehistoric birds were named in his honour – Confuciusornithiformes.

An Illustration of Confuciusornis sanctus

Confuciusornis sanctus.

Confuciusornis sanctus a primitive bird but it had a beak.

Picture Credit: University of Manchester

19 09, 2016

The Food Chains of Messel

By | September 19th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Main Page, Photos/Pictures of Fossils|0 Comments

Fossil Preserves Snake ate Lizard, Lizard ate Beetle

Scientists from the Senckenberg Museum of Natural History have published a paper on a spectacular fossil from the famous Messel oil shales that shows evidence of a food chain preserved from the Eocene.  A fossil snake contains the preserved remains of its last meal, a lizard inside its stomach, astonishingly the exquisite fossil has also preserved evidence of the unfortunate lizard’s last supper too – a beetle.  The discovery of a tripartite fossil food chain is unique for this UNESCO World Heritage site and the only other tripartite food chain known in the fossil record dates from the Early Permian*, coincidentally, it also was found in Germany.

Who’s Eating Who?  Remarkable Three Party Trophic Chain (Food Web)

The Messel Tripartite Food Chain fossil.

The snake fossil which contains a lizard fossil which contains a fossilised beetle.

Picture Credit: Dr. Krister Smith (Senckenberg Museum of Natural History)

Scientists from the Senckenberg Museum of Natural History in collaboration with colleagues from Argentina were able to study this “Russian Doll” of a fossil, that dates from around 48 million years ago and gain new information about the diets of these ancient creatures.  For example, the twenty centimetre long lizard, identified as Geiseltaliellus maarius, is only known from the Messel shales.  Specimens found to date with preserved stomach contents, only had plant remains within the body cavity, this new research indicates that G. maarius was not entirely herbivorous, insects such as beetles were also on the menu.

Commenting on the study, published in the Museum’s scientific journal, Doctor Krister Smith, one of the authors of the paper stated:

“In the year 2009, we were able to recover a plate from the pit that shows an almost fully preserved snake. As if this was not enough, we discovered a fossilised lizard inside the snake, which in turn contained a fossilised beetle in its innards!”

A Magnified View of the Snake Gut with Line Drawings Indicating the Presence of Other Fossil Specimens

Tripartite food chain in Messel fossil.

The orange represents the lizard fossil, the blue the beetle remains.

Picture Credit: Dr. Krister Smith (Senckenberg Museum of Natural History)

The picture above shows the bones of the snake outlined with the lizard shown in orange (skull to the left of the picture), the blue shape in the lizard gut indicates the fossilised remains of the lizard’s last meal- a small beetle.  Unfortunately, the scientists were not able to identify the beetle genus.  The way in which the lizard remains were overlapped by the ribs of the snake prove that the body of the little reptile was definitely inside the snake when the snake, identified as a type of early constrictor (Palaeopython fischeri), met its own demise.

There was an Old Lady who Swallowed a Fly…

This beautifully preserved fossil specimen reminds team members at Everything Dinosaur of the song “there was an old lady who swallowed a fly”.  For the scientists, the Palaeopython specimen provides a new insight into the feeding habits of these Eocene snakes.  The snake fossil measures around 89 centimetres in length, but adult Palaeopythons exceeded two metres in size and they were amongst the largest terrestrial predators known from the Messel shale biota.  Just like modern constrictors and pythons, the authors suggest that the diet of these snakes changed as the animals got bigger.  The juvenile Palaeopython represented here (specimen number SMF ME 11332), may have fed on small rodents and lizards, whilst the adult snakes may have taken larger vertebrates such as young Propalaeotherium (an ancestral horse).

Based on an assessment of the degree of preservation of the lizard’s remains when compared to digestive speeds in extant snakes, the researchers conclude that the snake died within 48 hours of consuming the lizard.  That’s a remarkable insight considering the age of the fossil itself (approximately 48 million-years-old).

The scientific paper: “Fossil Snake Preserving Three Trophic Levels and Evidence for an Ontogenetic Dietary Shift”.

Early Permian Trophic Chains

* The first direct evidence of a three-level vertebrate trophic chain was published in the “Proceedings of the Royal Society Biology” in January 2008.  The fossilised remains of a species of Xenacanthiformes freshwater shark (Triodus sessilis) contained the remains of two ancient amphibians (Archegosaurus decheni and Cheliderpeton latirostre) preserved within its gut.  The C. latirostre specimen contained the remains of a small fish, inside its digestive tract.  The small fish was identified as a juvenile Acanthodes bronni.

Xenacanthiform (T. sessilis) with Ingested Prey Items

Xenacanthiform ate amphibians which ate fish.

Three level trophic levels in Early Permian fossil.

Picture Credit: Proceedings of the Royal Society Biology

The picture above shows the siderite concretion that preserves the remains of the freshwater shark and evidence of a three-level food chain from the Early Permian of south-western Germany.  Below the fossil specimen photograph is a line drawing that highlights the material representing the shark as well as the fossils of two ingested Temnospondyl larvae.  One of the amphibian fossils contains the preserved remains of its last meal, a small fish (acanthodian).

Illustrating an Early Permian Food Chain

Fish east amphibians which ate fish.

Xenacanthiform eats amphibians which in turn consumed fish.

Picture Credit: Proceedings of the Royal Society Biology

The illustration above depicts the three level trophic food chain.  Its a question of fish eats amphibian which ate fish!

18 09, 2016

Early Humans and their Ancient Fish Hooks

By | September 18th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Main Page|0 Comments

World’s Oldest Fish Hooks Found on Okinawa

The largely volcanic island of Okinawa, south of the Japanese mainland has provided the earliest known evidence of early humans using fish hooks.  Ancient fish hooks, skilfully carved from snail shells are amongst the artefacts discovered in a limestone cave (Sakitari Cave).  Archaeologists have stated that these fish hooks and other finds demonstrate the importance of adapting to maritime ecosystems as it permitted the spread of our species across the Pacific.

Ancient Fish Hooks Provide Clues to Human Expansion in the Late Pleistocene

Ancient fish hooks.

Ancient fish hooks from a limestone cave on the island of Okinawa.

Picture Credit: M. Fujita et al (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)

The island of Okinawa lies between the mainland of Japan and Taiwan, at roughly three times the size of the Isle of Wight, it might be thought that this location would have been a very suitable habitat for human habitation, but the researchers, writing in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences”, suggest that this geographically isolated island may only have been occupied for part of the year, permitting early humans to exploit a seasonal food source.  In truth, Okinawa would have been a relatively inhospitable place for early settlers.  Fossil finds indicate that there were just a handful of kinds of large, terrestrial mammals on the island that could have acted as a source of meat.  There were two species of dwarf deer and wild boars.  Okinawa has virtually no raw materials that would have suited the technological demands of early humans, as a result, a number of researchers have hypothesised that the islands that make up this Japanese archipelago were too small for sustained occupation by Palaeolithic people.

The discoveries made by Japanese archaeologists including scientists from the Okinawa Prefectural Museum and Art Museum, along with colleagues from the University of Tokyo, have helped to “fill in a gap”, plotting the migration of Late Pleistocene humans across the western Pacific.

Charting the Spread of Humanity in the Western Pacific

A map charting the movement of humans in the Pacific (Pleistocene).

Pleistocene migration of humans across the Pacific.

Picture Credit: M. Fujita et al (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)

Sakitari Cave lies more than a mile from the present coastline of south Okinawa, however, when the fish hook makers visited the island, sea levels were lower and the cave would have been located more than two and a half miles from the sea.  The archaeologists were able to successfully carbon date layers in the cave which indicate successive human occupation extending back to 35,000 to 30,000 years ago.  It is thought that maritime adaptation was one of the essential factors that enabled modern humans to spread all over the world.  The lack of clear data provides only a patchy picture of how humans moved into new parts of the world during the Late Pleistocene Epoch.  This new study of the well-stratified layers in Sakitari Cave, lends support to the idea that early modern humans were more advanced in their maritime technology than previously thought.  The finished and unfinished fish hooks, which had been carved from snail shells, have been calculated to be between 22,380 and 22,770 years old (radiocarbon dating of the carbon from the charcoal layer in which the fish hooks were found).  Other finds include marine molluscs as well as an abundance of freshwater mollusc shells, a potential grind stone and stone flakes along with a tooth and fragmentary human remains including bones representing an infant.

Finds from Sakitari Cave

Finds including human fossils from Sakitari cave.

Artefacts from the cave on Okinawa.

Picture Credit: M. Fujita et al (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)

Accounting for any margin of error within the dating assessment, these fish hooks are older than similar fishhooks found in East Timor (between 23,000 and 16,000 years old) and New Ireland in Papua New Guinea (20,000 to 18,000 years old).  The findings lend support to the idea that these early modern humans were more advanced with maritime technology than previously thought, and that they were capable of sustaining themselves on relatively small, geographically remote Pacific islands.

The persistent occupation on this relatively small, geographically isolated island, as well as the appearance of Palaeolithic sites on nearby islands by 30,000 years ago, suggest a wider distribution of successful maritime adaptations than previously recognised, spanning the lower to mid-latitude areas in the western Pacific coastal region.  It seems that fishing has been a part of human activity for a very, very long time.

The paper: “Advanced Maritime Adaptation in the Western Pacific Coastal Region extends back to 35,000 to 30,000 Years Before Present”.

To read an article about the East Timor artefacts including ancient fish hooks: Tuna Catching Prehistoric Fishermen (or women)

To read an article published in 2015 about research into human teeth found in Sri Lanka that suggests a highly adapted rainforest technology in Late Pleistocene humans: Those Highly Adaptable Ancestors

17 09, 2016

Schleich T. rex Model and a Young Dinosaur Fan

By | September 17th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page|0 Comments

A Young Dinosaur Fan and a Schleich T. rex

Team members at Everything Dinosaur have been busy cataloguing and classifying lots of dinosaur pictures.  This work is being carried out for a special project we are working on, we can’t tell you about the project in too much detail for the moment, suffice to say we are very excited about it and it does involve looking at lots and lots of pictures of dinosaur models.  Whilst browsing all the data files we came across this wonderful picture that had been sent to us by our friends at Schleich.  It shows one the World of History Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaur models being played with by a young dinosaur fan.

The Schleich Tyrannosaurus rex Dinosaur Model with a Young Dinosaur Fan

Tyrannosaurus rex model and a young dinosaur fan.

T. rex model and a young dinosaur fan.

Picture Credit: Schleich

The budding young palaeontologist seems very pleased with this prehistoric animal replica and he is full of admiration for the “King of the Tyrant Lizards”.  The model is actually the dark green Tyrannosaurus rex, it was introduced by Schleich in 2012.  A light green version of T. rex was introduced in 2014, both models have proved to be very popular with young dinosaur fans.

Schleich Tyrannosaurus Models Side by Side

A pair of Schleich T. rex dinosaur models.

2012 version on left
2014 version on right

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Spotting the Differences Between Two Schleich Dinosaur Models

There are subtle differences between these two dinosaur models.  The easiest way to tell the two models apart (even in a black and white photograph), is to look at the area that approximates to the knee.  The earlier version has a series of dots, whereas the 2014 replica does not.  Schleich will be adding some more T. rex dinosaur models to their range in 2017, for a preview of the new models including the new tyrannosaurids, try this link: Schleich Prehistoric Animal Models for 2017 (part 2).

These types of dinosaur models make for great, creative, imaginative play and over the years Schleich has re-modelled their product range, tending to produce very colourful figures including some wonderful Theropod dinosaurs.  We recall a Schleich T. rex model being specially commissioned to celebrate the centenary of the scientific description and naming of this Late Cretaceous, North American, meat-eating dinosaur back in 2006.  These German manufacturers certainly have a long and proud prehistoric animal model legacy.

To view the current range of large dinosaur and prehistoric animal models made by Schleich: Schleich World of History Prehistoric Animal Models

We wonder what other interesting dinosaur themed pictures and graphics we will find as we trawl through our extensive archive.

16 09, 2016

Dinosaur Drawing from India

By | September 16th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Dinosaur Fan Sends in Dinosaur Drawing

Our thanks to Eashwar from India who sent into Everything Dinosaur’s offices another dinosaur drawing.  Eashwar emailed us a picture of Hypoendocrine rex, a mutant tyrannosaurid from the virtual reality prehistoric animal themed game “The Isle”.

Eashwar’s Mutant Tyrannosaur Drawing

Mutant tyrannosaurid.

Hypoendocrine T. rex drawing.

Picture Credit: M.V. Eashwar

The Isle Game

The Isle is a substantial, multi-player platform created by a group of veteran gaming developers (which we think are based in the United States).  Team members at Everything Dinosaur are not that familiar with this particular platform but the island is inhabited by a large number of mutant dinosaurs including a Hypoendocrine T. rex.

Our thanks to M. V. Eashwar for sending in his mutant tyrannosaurid drawing.

15 09, 2016

Calculating the Colour of Psittacosaurus

By | September 15th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Colour, Camouflage and Countershading in Dinosaurs

It turns out that the little dinosaur Psittacosaurus (parrot lizard), was light underneath and darker on its back.  This colour pattern, known as countershading is a common form of camouflage in extant animals.  Scientists including researchers from Bristol University conclude this in a new study of a beautifully preserved Psittacosaurus specimen currently on public display at the Senckenberg Museum of Natural History in Germany.  The study has been published in the academic journal “Current Biology”.

Reconstructing the Colour of Psittacosaurus

Reconstructing countershading in Psittacosaurus.

Physical reconstruction of Psittacosaurus with original colour patterns.

Picture Credit: Jakob Vinther and Bob Nicholls

Knowing the potential colour of an animal gives clues to its probable habitat.  The research team postulate that this little herbivore lived in an environment with diffuse light, such as in a forest.  To test this idea, a three-dimensional model of this Early Cretaceous dinosaur was created, step forward the very talented Bob Nicholls who has made a number of prehistoric animal models before for various museums and exhibitions.

The specimen on display at the Senckenberg Museum of Natural History, most likely originates from the Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, China.  The fossil was illegally exported from China, in violation of Chinese law, but was purchased by the German museum.

The Fossilised Skeleton of Psittacosaurus (Senckenberg Museum of Natural History)

Psittacosaurus dinosaur fossil.

Psittacosaurus, early Cretaceous (120 million years old), preserving skin with colour patterns, Senckenberg Museum, Frankfurt, Germany

Picture Credit: Jakob Vinther and Robert Nicholls

One of the authors of the new scientific paper, Dr. Jakob Vinther (School of Earth Sciences and Biological Sciences, Bristol University) stated:

“The fossil, preserves clear countershading, which has been shown to function by counter-illuminating shadows on a body, thus making an animal appear optically flat to the eye of the beholder.”

Behavioural ecologist and co-author of the study, Professor Innes Cuthill from the School of Biological Sciences, added:

“By reconstructing a life-size 3D model, we were able to not only see how the patterns of shading changed over the body, but also that it matched the sort of camouflage which would work best in a forested environment.”

Countershading  most likely served to protect Psittacosaurus, a facultative biped and a member of the bird-hipped dinosaur group (Ornithischians), against predators that use patterns of shadow on an object to determine shape, just as we humans do.

Dr Vinther realised that structures previously thought to be artefacts or dead bacteria in fossilised feathers were actually “melanosomes,” small structures that carry melanin pigments found in the feathers and skin of many animals.  In some well-preserved specimens, such as the Psittacosaurus the researchers worked on in the new study, it is possible to make out the patterns of preserved melanin without the aid of a microscope.
Professor Cuthill and colleagues at Bristol had also been exploring the distribution of countershading in modern animals.  But it was no easy matter to apply the same principles to an extinct animal that had been crushed flat and fossilised.  To explore this idea further they teamed up with local palaeoartist, Bob Nicholls in order to reconstruct the remarkable fossil in to a physical model which, they say, is the most scientifically accurate life-size model of a dinosaur with its real colour patterns.

Days of careful studies of the fossil, taking measurements of the bones, studying the preserved scales and the pigment patterns, with input on muscle structure from Bristol palaeontologists Professor Emily Rayfield and Dr Stephan Lautenschlager, led to months of careful modelling of the dinosaur.
Bob Nicholls explained:

“Our Psittacosaurus was reconstructed from the inside-out.  There are thousands of scales, all different shapes and sizes, and many of them are only partially pigmented.  It was a painstaking process but we now have the best suggestion as to what this dinosaur really looked like.”

In order to investigate what environment the psittacosaur had evolved to live in, Dr Vinther, Bob Nicholls and Professor Cuthill took another cast of the model and painted it all grey.  They then placed it in the Cretaceous plant section of Bristol Botanic Garden and photographed it under an open sky and underneath trees to see how the shadow was cast under those conditions.  By comparing the shadow to the pattern in the fossil they could then predict what environment the psittacosaur lived in.

Psittacosaurus in the Bristol Botanic Garden

Psittacosaurus model in the Bristol Botanic Garden.

Psittacosaurus photographed in the Bristol Botanic Garden.

Picture Credit: Jakob Vinther

Dr Vinther stated:

“We predicted that the psittacosaur must have lived in a forest.  This demonstrates that fossil colour patterns can provide not only a better picture of what extinct animals looked like, but they can also give new clues about extinct ecosystems and habitats.  We were amazed to see how well these colour patterns actually worked to camouflage this little dinosaur.”

Psittacosaurus, which Professor Cuthill describes as “both weird and cute, with horns on either side of its head and long bristles on its tail”, lived in the Early Cretaceous of China and has been found in the same rock strata where many feathered dinosaurs have been discovered.  A number of species have been assigned to the Psittacosaurus genus, more species assigned to this genus than in any other genus of the Dinosauria.

Everything Dinosaur congratulates the researchers for this most insightful study and also acknowledges the efforts of the design team at the model maker CollectA for producing such an accurate representation of Psittacosaurus in the company’s dinosaur model range.

The Accurate CollectA Psittacosaurus Dinosaur Model

A typical psittacosaurid.

A typical psittacosaurid.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The deposits that make up the Yixian Formation include evidence for a forest environment (based on wood and plant fossils).  The researchers say that they would now like to explore other types of camouflage in fossils and to use this evidence in understanding how predators could perceive the environment and to understand their role in shaping evolution and biodiversity.
The Scientific Paper: Vinther, J., Nicholls, R., Lautenschlager, S., Pittman, M., Kaye, T. G., Rayfield, E., Mayr, G. and Cuthill, I. C. 2016. 3D Camouflage in an Ornithischian Dinosaur. Current Biology.

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the help of Bristol University in the compilation of this article.

14 09, 2016

Dinosaurs Visit Coventry

By | September 14th, 2016|Key Stage 1/2|Comments Off on Dinosaurs Visit Coventry

Dinosaurs Visit Coventry

Yesterday, one of our dinosaur experts along with lots of fossils was “sent to Coventry”.  Not to worry, one of our enthusiastic team members has not been ostracised, they went to Coventry to visit Howes Primary to conduct a series of dinosaur and fossil themed workshops with Year 1 and Year 2.  During the session with the first class, our dinosaur expert challenged the budding young palaeontologists to have a go at drawing their very own dinosaur.  At the end of our busy morning we were presented with a selection of very colourful prehistoric animal drawings that the children had produced.

The Children Wrote a “Thank You” on Their Colourful Dinosaur Drawings

Year 1 draw dinosaurs.

A colourful dinosaur drawing by Year 1.

Picture Credit: Howes Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

The children in Year 2 were accompanied by some of the budding palaeontologists from the Hearing Impaired Unit.  All the children enjoyed handling the various fossils and learning lots of prehistoric animal facts and figures.  We helped explain about just how big some dinosaurs could be and we looked at herbivorous dinosaurs such as Ankylosaurus and Triceratops as well as meat-eating dinosaurs.  Some of the children were keen to demonstrate their dinosaur knowledge by naming dinosaurs that were omnivores.

Even Flying Reptiles (Pterosaurs) Featured on the Children’s Prehistoric Animal Drawings

Year 1 draw Pterosaurs.

Dinosaur and Pterosaur drawings from Howes Primary school.

Picture Credit: Howes Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

Carnivores, Omnivores and Herbivores

The teaching team requested some additional support with helping to explain simple food chains and the diets of dinosaurs.  Our dinosaur expert was happy to oblige.  Some extension resources had been brought with us on the day, but that evening, our dedicated dinosaur experts emailed over some additional support resources including a couple of exercises all about dinosaur food webs.

Howes Primary School Children Draw Dinosaurs (Year 1)

Lots of colourful dinosaur drawings.

Children at Howes Primary (Coventry) draw dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Howes Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

 We even “tweeted” some pictures to the school’s Twitter account, it’s all about providing support and additional resources to assist the hard-working teaching team.

14 09, 2016

The Next Edition of Prehistoric Times

By | September 14th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Magazine Reviews, Main Page|0 Comments

Sneak Peek – Prehistoric Times (Issue 119)

Our thanks to Mike Fredericks (editor), who emailed over to Everything Dinosaur an image of the front cover of the next issue of Prehistoric Times, which is due out shortly.  It was a cheering sight amidst the dark clouds, torrential rain and thunder that we experienced yesterday evening.  It was definitely a night for staying indoors and perusing previous editions of this quarterly magazine for dinosaur fans and collectors of prehistoric animal models.

The Front Cover of the Next Prehistoric Times

The front cover of Prehistoric Times magazine (issue 119)

A very colourful and action packed front cover.

Picture Credit: Mike Fredericks

The front cover artwork has been provided by the fabulously talented palaeoartist Fabio Pastori, what a spectacular pair of fighting tyrannosaurids!  If we recall correctly, the last time the artwork of Fabio graced the front cover was back in the winter of 2014 (issue 108), we look forward to seeing more of Fabio’s amazing illustrations in the autumn edition, which should be with us shortly.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s review of the winter 2014 issue of Prehistoric Times: A Review of Prehistoric Times (issue 108)

Zdeněk Burian

The autumn edition also contains a feature on the prehistoric landscapes of Zdeněk Burian, a Czech artist and book illustrator whose prehistoric animal illustrations played a pivotal role in the development of scientific drawings used by museums and book publishers.  This artist, whose work can be found in many natural history museums throughout the world, is regarded by many people as the doyen of palaeontological artwork.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur are also looking forward to the special features on Acrocanthosaurus and the “dawn horse” Eohippus, which will also be included in the forthcoming issue.

Prehistoric Times, is an excellent magazine for the serious dinosaur fan, to visit Prehistoric Times website, simply click the link below:

Visit Prehistoric Times: Prehistoric Times Magazine

Our thanks to Mike Fredericks for sending us a sneaky peek of the front cover.

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