All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
12 06, 2016

Year 2 Children Make Dinosaur Posters

By | June 12th, 2016|Key Stage 1/2|Comments Off on Year 2 Children Make Dinosaur Posters

Half-term Activities for Year 2 Pupils

Children in Year 2 at Newport Infant School (Shropshire), were given a special task by their teachers for the half-term holiday.  The three classes that make up Year 2 (Hedgehog, Deer and Squirrel) were going to be studying dinosaurs as their term topic for the latter part of the Summer term, so as preparation, the enthusiastic teachers challenged the children to produce a piece of dinosaur themed work over the holidays.  Some children chose to make prehistoric animal models, others decided to build their own “Jurassic World” diorama.  The Everything Dinosaur fossil expert who visited the school to conduct a series of dinosaur themed workshops with the children, was given the opportunity to view the colourful display.

Year 2 Pupils at Newport Infant School Make a Dinosaur Themed Display

A dinosaur world created by Year 2

A dinosaur world created by a pupil in Hedgehog class (Year 2)

Picture Credit: Newport Infant School/Everything Dinosaur

The children had clearly enjoyed this half-term holiday challenge.  We suspect that some mums and dads got involved too.  Our Everything Dinosaur staff member even saw a superb chocolate cake that had been baked by young Will and his mum.  It looked very tasty indeed!

One Pupil Brought a Dinosaur Inspired Chocolate Cake

An inspiring dinosaur chocolate cake.

Could this be a “choco-lot-saurus”?

Picture Credit: Newport Infant School/Everything Dinosaur

Children Make Dinosaur Posters

 A number of children had produced science posters all about dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures.  The posters showed that the pupils had undertaken a considerable amount of research into this topic before creating their poster.  Grace for example, produced a poster that showed different types of dinosaur and asked questions that our fossil expert was able to answer during the dinosaur workshop with Grace’s class.

A Number of Pupils Made Super Dinosaur Posters Over Half-Term

A dinosaur poster created by a Year 2 pupil.

Grace (Hedgehog class) made a super dinosaur poster.

Picture Credit: Grace – Newport Infant School/Everything Dinosaur

With an enthusiastic teaching team and such a carefully crafted scheme of work the pupils in Year 2 at Newport Infant School are going to have an exciting end to their school year.

12 06, 2016

Natural History Museum Diplodocus and Kentrosaurus

By | June 12th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Dinosaur Collection Diplodocus and Kentrosaurus

An old friend of Everything Dinosaur is back in stock, the Natural History Museum dinosaur collection set featuring Diplodocus and the armoured dinosaur Kentrosaurus.  It is great to see this dinosaur model set that features two Late Jurassic herbivores back on the shelves of the warehouse.

The Natural History Museum Dinosaur Collection Diplodocus and Kentrosaurus

The Kentrosaurus and Diplodocus dinosaur models.

The Diplodocus and Kentrosaurus dinosaur models.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view this model set and the rest of dinosaur replicas in this range available from Everything Dinosaur: Dinosaur Replicas – The Natural History Museum

The Diplodocus model measures around forty centimetres in length whilst the Kentrosaurus, (which was a much smaller dinosaur), measures a fraction under ten centimetres long.

Late Jurassic Dinosaurs

Although these dinosaurs lived at the same time, palaeontologists are quietly confident that they never co-existed.  Fossils of Diplodocus are associated with Upper Jurassic deposits of the western United States, whilst Kentrosaurus fossils have been found in Tanzania.  Diplodocus is one of the most famous of all the long-necked dinosaurs.  It is so well known, in part, because a cast of a Diplodocus was donated to the London Natural History Museum by the Scottish-American philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.  This 87 foot long replica greeted visitors to the museum as it was located in the centre of the Museum’s Hintze Hall, close to the main entrance.  However, in 2015 a decision was made to relocate “Dippy” as the specimen had become affectionately known as and replace it with the skeleton of a Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus).

Kentrosaurus is a member of the Stegosaur family, it was formally named in described 101 years ago by the German palaeontologist Edwin Hennig (in 1915).  These dinosaur models are superficially similar, both have spikes running down the back to the tail.  Many palaeontologists now believe that Diplodocus may have had narrow, pointed spikes lining the hips and located down the long tail.  Although this view is not universally accepted as Everything Dinosaur’s latest illustration of “double beam” shows:

An Illustration of Diplodocus from the Everything Dinosaur Database

A Diplodocus drawing.

A drawing of Diplodocus “double beam”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It is always a pleasure to see this model set on the shelves in our warehouse and the Natural History Museum dinosaur collection remains a very popular model range amongst collectors and dinosaur fans alike.  Diplodocus and Kentrosaurus may have never encountered each other, but they seem very happy together in this well crafted model set.”

Load More Posts