Monolophosaurus Voted Best Prehistoric Animal Toy Figure of 2014

Readers of “Prehistoric Times” magazine have voted the Monolophosaurus dinosaur model made by Safari Ltd as the best prehistoric animal toy figure for 2014.  This dinosaur is known from just one fossil specimen found in north-western China (Xinjiang Province), it has been assigned to the Megalosauroidea super-family of the Theropoda, although its phylogenetic affinities remain unclear.  It was certainly a formidable hunter, reaching lengths in excess of five metres and perhaps weighing as much as four male African lions (Panthero leo).

Award Winning Monolophosaurus Dinosaur Model

Middle Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur

Middle Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd

This model, originally sculpted by Doug Watson, is part of the highly successful Wild Safari Dinosaurs model range made by Safari Ltd.   The Monopholosaurus was one of three, new dinosaurs added to this range in 2014, the others being the spinosaurid Suchomimus and the horned dinosaur Pachyrhinosaurus.

Everything Dinosaur produced a short, video review of this model back in February 2014.  This video (running time of 5:49), provides details about this dinosaur, its discovery and reflects on the way the model maker has interpreted the fossil evidence.

Everything Dinosaur Reviews the Wild Safari Dinosaurs Monolophosaurus

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It’s a pat on the back for Safari Ltd for having their Monolophosaurus honoured in this way.  For us, it is very pleasing to see Middle Jurassic dinosaurs from China being included in such a prestigious model series.  Most model ranges include the likes of Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex but for a company to produce a replica of Monolophosaurus, this really helps to make that range stand out.”

To view the range of Safari Ltd models available from Everything Dinosaur: Safari Ltd Prehistoric Animal Models

For us, what’s the most intriguing thing about “Single Crested Lizard”?  Surprisingly, it’s not trying to work out the function of that bizarre, thin crest on the head.  The jawbone of the holotype showed signs of puncture marks and scratches that were made by the teeth of another meat-eating dinosaur.  Since no other parts of the holotype fossil material showed such signs, this was interpreted as not post-mortem scavenging on the carcase, but evidence of “face biting” between rivals, perhaps even siblings.

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