Schleich Light Green Tyrannosaurus rex Video Review

The new for 2014 Schleich light green Tyrannosaurus rex is the first of the new Schleich dinosaurs to have a a video review created for it.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur have enthusiastically plotted the progress of the four new models scheduled for introduction this year by Schleich into their “World of History” series.  It is our intention to produce reviews for all the new models, but the T. rex replica is a very good place to start.

There are a total of three Tyrannosaurs currently made by Schleich, two within the larger model series and a third, smaller model in what was called “die kleinen Dinos” by our German friends.  As with all prehistoric animal model manufacturers, T. rex tends to act as a flagship model for the factory, after all, it is the one dinosaur replica that is made by all the model manufacturers and the new, light green Tyrannosaurus rex from Schleich stands up very well to scrutiny.

The Light Green Tyrannosaurus rex Model (Schleich)

T. rex (Schleich 2014)

T. rex (Schleich 2014)

It is a very tactile model, has lots of detail and the articulated lower jaw is bound to make it very popular amongst young dinosaur fans.  The five minute video review discusses some of the features of this new replica and compares it to the 2012 Tyrannosaur model introduced by Schleich when their revamped prehistoric animal model range “Urzeittiere Dinosaurier”, this translates as prehistoric animals – dinosaurs, first came out.

Everything Dinosaur’s Video Review of the Light Green T. rex (Schleich)

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In this short video, we look at the possibility of making this new T. rex model the male in a pair of Tyrannosaurs with the slightly larger, dark green, 2012 T. rex being the female.  There is evidence to suggest that the females were larger than the males.  The fossil record from locations such as the the Hell Creek Formation of the western United States indicates two forms of Late Cretaceous Tyrannosaur, a robust form and a gracile form.  Could this fossil material represent differences between boys and girls just as we see today with some species of birds?

To view the Schleich prehistoric animals available from Everything Dinosaur: Schleich Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animal Models

The females may have been bigger as they required wider hips to permit the storage and passage of eggs.  Females in many different types of animal tend to be bigger than the males, In Tyrannosaur circles, could the girls have ruled the roost?  For the moment, the fossil evidence poses this intriguing question finding definitive proof is somewhat tricky, however, thanks to Schleich at least dinosaur fans and model collectors can create their own family of Tyrannosaurs.

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