Science Week in Schools

Teachers at Everything Dinosaur are frequently asked to attend schools and participate in school projects, events or programmes promoting science.  Such activities can involve students in all sorts of exciting and curriculum enriching lessons and palaeontology does lend itself to become the basis for a science or maths orientated lesson plan.  After all, if the children are genuinely interested and excited about something they are doing they are likely to learn more and remember.  Everything Dinosaur team members recently took part in Lorton Primary School’s science week, we met lots of enthusiastic students and as usual we were bombarded with questions as we cast dinosaur teeth, showed fossils and demonstrated how much you can learn by looking at dinosaur foot prints.  We even took a peep inside a dinosaur’s stomach!  All part of our teaching about fossils in schools.

Nervous Moments with an Experiment

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above shows a pupil at Lorton Primary School, carefully preparing a cast of a real Tyrannosaurus rex tooth, that was found in Alberta, Canada.  A steady nerve is required, but with luck the class will have their very own T. rex tooth to study in a few minutes time.

Fossils are Really Cool!

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

One of the really great things about fossil hunting is that in most case, when looking in the United Kingdom, you can keep what you find.  One pupil is rather taken by this beautiful Ammonite fossil found by an Everything Dinosaur team member at Charmouth, Dorset.  We use the Ammonite fossils to explain a little about the fossilisation process and to demonstrate that not all fossils are dinosaurs.

Rather Taken with T. rex Toes

Rather taken with T. rex Toes

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

With all the museum quality fossils and casts that we have in our collection, young palaeontologists get the chance to handle and get close to some amazing objects such as this cast of an adult Tyrannosaurus rex left metatarsals (II,III and IV), part of our section of the teaching programme where we try to compare the bones of a big dinosaur to those of own bodies.  With our qualified teachers we certainly get invited to a lot of schools and who knows, we might just inspire a young person to take up a career in science.

We always appreciate the hard work of the teachers, teaching assistants and the PTA for organising such activities, as part of our commitment to the Institute for Learning and other bodies we are members of, we get feedback on our work.  We get some lovely comments and team members are always thinking up new ways to inform and to educate.

Dinosaur Workshops and Dinosaur Teaching: Dinosaur Teaching and Dinosaur Workshops for School

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