School Site Updates

Everything Dinosaur’s School Site Updates

Busy days at Everything Dinosaur, not only are team members starting the first of the autumn term’s teaching assignments this morning, but there are further updates being added to the company’s bespoke teaching website.  Everything Dinosaur provides a lot of educational resources and support to schools, home educators, teaching assistants and museums.  The teaching website was set up so as to provide a dedicated support site about dinosaurs and fossils to assist those involved in education.

Teaching tips, articles, resources and free downloads.

Teaching tips, articles, resources and free downloads.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Amongst the free downloads, teaching plans, schemes of work and other resources, Everything Dinosaur team members have been busy writing bespoke articles about how dinosaurs and fossils can help in education on the site’s teaching blog.  Trouble is, we have hundreds of articles and even more ideas for new articles so this task is monumental.  Still we shall persevere and new articles are being posted up all the time.

To visit Everything Dinosaur’s dedicated teaching site: Dinosaur and Fossil Themed Resources for Schools

New Species of Titanosaur Named – Rukwatitan bisepultus

Rukwatitan bisepultus – A Rare African Giant

Titanosaurs are a bit like buses, you wait for ages and then two of them come along together.  No sooner did we complete our synopsis on the research on the colossal Dreadnoughtus schrani, a newly described Titanosaur from south-western Patagonia, then we have the opportunity to discuss another new species, this time from Africa.  This new Titanosaur, named Rukwatitan bisepultus may not be quite as big as the newly described Dreadnoughtus but we at Everything Dinosaur estimate that fossils excavated from a hazardous cliff face in a steep quarry represent a dinosaur that was around ten metres long, or possibly much bigger.  Comparisons with the fossil bones from the Malawisaurus indicate that this Titanosaur could have exceeded sixteen metres in length.  This herbivore would have been able to survey its floodplain home from a height of approximately four metres.

An Artist’s Impression of the New Titanosaur (Rukwatitan bisepultus)

New genus of Titanosaur described from Tanzania.

New genus of Titanosaur described from Tanzania.

Picture Credit: Mark Witton

But with Titanosaurs, size isn’t everything.  Rukwatitan may not be a record breaker in terms of its body mass but its discovery is perhaps more significant than the fossils of the South American giants.  This is only the fourth genus of Titanosaur discovered in Africa* and the palaeontologists at the University of Ohio, who excavated the fossils out of the cliff over two field seasons, are confident that their find will help scientists to understand more about the global distribution and the diversity of the titanosaurids as well as helping to piece together more data on the evolution of sub-Saharan dinosaurs.

A Silhouette of Rukwatitan bisepulutus Showing Fossils Found

Scale bar = 1 metre

Scale bar = 1 metre

Picture Credit: Eric Gorscak (Ohio University)

The picture above shows a bauplan of the new Titanosaur and the position of the fossil bones that were found in relation to the body plan.

Titanosaurs are wide-bodied Sauropods that probably evolved sometime in the Late Jurassic and survived until the Cretaceous mass extinction event.  They are the only Sauropods known to have survived into the Late Cretaceous, but only in South America did these animals make up a significant proportion of the herbivorous megafauna, elsewhere, the Ornithopods dominated.  When compared to other types of Sauropoda, Titanosaurs tended to have wider bodies, due to the more robust and larger pectoral area (chest).  The limbs were strong and stocky, often the front limbs were longer than the hind limbs.  The spinal column was more flexible than in diplodocids, perhaps helping them to rear up more easily.  The heads were small, proportionately smaller than other types of Sauropod.  Titanosaurs were geologically widespread and their fossils have been found on all the continents including Antarctica.  A number of sub-families have been identified and some of the titanosaurids are amongst the largest, terrestrial vertebrates known to science.

To read about the Antarctica fossil find (2011): Titanosaurs of the Antarctic

The fossils were found in the Rukwa Rift Basin area of south-western Tanzania (hence the genus name).  Scientists from Ohio University in collaboration with several other universities have carried out a number of excavations from the Red Sandstone Group deposits, that form part of the Galula Formation.  Fossils of turtles, crocodilians and primitive mammals have also been found in the formation, as well as dinosaur remains.  The fossil bearing strata is believed to have been laid down approximately 100 million years ago (Late Albian faunal stage of the Cretaceous).

The Fossils were Excavated from a Steep Cliff Face

The fossils were excavated from a steep cliff.

The fossils were excavated from a steep cliff.

Picture Credit: Patrick O’Connnor (Ohio University)

The vertebrates associated with the Galula Formation have shown some unique anatomical features indicating that the floodplain environment which is represented by these sandstone deposits may have been separated from other parts of Gondwana, permitting a unique fauna to evolve.  Last year, scientists from Ohio University reported the discovery of a new type of crocodilian (Rukwasuchus yajabalijekundu) that was different from other crocodilians found in deposits of the same geological age but from further north.

Some of the Fossils Exposed after Excavation

Fossil material exposed.

Fossil material exposed.

Picture Credit: Ohio University

One of the authors of the scientific paper, published in the “Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology”, Patrick O’Connor (Professor of Anatomy at Ohio University) stated:

“There may have been certain environmental features, such as deserts, large waterways and/or mountain ranges that would have limited the movement of animals and promoted the evolution of regionally distinct faunas.  Only additional data on the faunas and the palaeo-environments from around the continent will let us further test such hypotheses.”

Two Caudal Vertebrae (Tail bones) from the Site

A number of caudal vertebrae including several articulated vertebrae have been found.

A number of caudal vertebrae including several articulated vertebrae have been found.

Picture Credit: Ohio University

* Team members have had a go at naming the four genera of African Titanosaurs currently described, here we go:

  1. The basal Titanosaur from Tanzania (Upper Tendaguru Formation) – Janenschia robusta (Late Jurassic)
  2. The Lithostrotian Titanosaur from Malawi (unknown formation) Malawisaurus dixeyi (Cretaceous)
  3. The basal Lithostorian Titanosaur? Rukwatitan bisepulutus (described above)
  4. The Lithostrotian Titanosaur from Egypt (Bahariya Formation) Paralititan stromeri (Late Cretaceous)

To read the acclaimed article written by Everything Dinosaur on the newly discovered Titanosaur Dreadnoughtus: New Titanosaur from South-Western Patagonia

Time Running Out To Enter Dinosaur T-shirt Contest

Name the Dinosaur Competition

As we celebrate the introduction of Everything Dinosaur’s range of childrens’ dinosaur themed T-shirts, our competition to think of a suitable name for one of the dinosaurs featured in the new designs, really seems to have taken off.  We have lots of entries so far, but there is still time to enter (competition closes on Friday 19th September).  Please note this competition is now closed.

One of the designs on our dinosaur T-shirts features a baby T. rex.  He (or she), looks very cute and the competition is simple – come up with a name for this little critter.

The Range of Exclusive Everything Dinosaur T-shirts

The first of the dinosaur themed T-shirts from Everything Dinosaur.

The first of the dinosaur themed T-shirts from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Give a name to our baby dinosaur and we will send one lucky winner a dinosaur T-shirt from our new range* for their junior palaeontologist to wear!

Think of a name for me to win a T-shirt!

Think of a name for me to win a T-shirt!

To enter the contest for a chance to win a dinosaur themed T-shirt for your own young dinosaur fan, all you have to do is “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s FACEBOOK page, then comment on the picture of the baby dinosaur design on the red T-shirt (pictured above).  Our friendly baby dinosaur needs a name, what can you come up with?

To enter, just visit Everything Dinosaur on FACEBOOK  and “like” our page and remember to leave a suggested name by making a comment under the “apprentice dinosaur” image.

Everything Dinosaur on Facebook

Click the logo to visit our Facebook page and to give our page a "like".

Click the logo to visit our Facebook page and to give our page a “like”.

Everything Dinosaur on FACEBOOK: “LIKE” Our Facebook Page and Enter Competition

We will draw the lucky winner at random and the name caption competition closes on Friday 19th September 2014.  Good luck!

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of dinosaur and prehistoric animal themed clothing click on the picture below:

Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Pjs, T-shirts, Sweatshirts etc.

Exclusive to Everything Dinosaur

Exclusive to Everything Dinosaur

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of dinosaur T-shirts and other dinosaur themed clothing for children: Dinosaur Clothes including Dinosaur T-shirts

*The range of T-shirt sizes available to the prize winner

Competition Winner can choose from these sizes.

Competition winner can choose from these sizes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* please note the red “Appentice Palaeontologist T-shirt is only available in sizes up to 9 yrs-11 yrs, chest size 82 cm.

Terms and Conditions of Name Our Baby Dinosaur Competition

Automated entries are not permitted and will be excluded from the draw.

Only one entry per person.

The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative will be offered.

The Everything Dinosaur name a baby dinosaur caption competition runs until Friday 19th September 2014.

Winner will be notified by private message on Facebook or email.

Prize includes postage and packing.

For full terms and conditions email: Contact Everything Dinosaur

PLEASE NOTE THIS COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED.

Everything Dinosaur’s New School Site Goes from Strength to Strength

Teachers Getting Access to Free Downloads

The new school website from Everything Dinosaur has only been “live” for a little over a week but already teachers and learning support providers from as far away as Australia and California have been taking the opportunity to download the free teaching resources.  With the new curriculum being rolled out in England, there is a strong emphasis on “working scientifically” and our trained teachers and academics have been enthusiastically offering support and teaching advice.

New Schools and Educational Website From Everything Dinosaur

Teaching tips, articles, resources and free downloads.

Teaching tips, articles, resources and free downloads.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In the science curriculum, rocks and fossils are an integral part of Key Stage 2 and dinosaurs make a fantastic term topic subject for Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) and Reception.  Everything Dinosaur’s school visits start in earnest next week, but our teaching team hope to post up some more, free dinosaur and fossil themed teaching resources before the teaching schedule and dinosaur workshops get into full swing.

A spokes person for Everything Dinosaur commented:

“We have been very pleased with the take up, lots and lots of free dinosaur and fossil themed teaching resources have already been downloaded by teachers, teaching assistants and home educators.”

To visit Everything Dinosaur’s teaching website, a website aimed at helping teachers and other educationalists with the delivery of Earth science based teaching schemes and lesson plans: Everything Dinosaur School Site

Fossil Damaged at Dinosaur National Monument (Utah)

Dinosaur Fossil Damaged and a Piece Stolen from Dinosaur National Monument

It once was a near perfect fossil of the upper arm bone of a Sauropod dinosaur, now it is broken and damaged with a fist-sized chunk missing.  Rangers at the Dinosaur National Monument in Utah have reported the vandalism and theft of part of a humerus.  It is extremely sad to have to report on yet another theft of a dinosaur fossil, officials at the Monument are appealing to members of the public to help them trace the culprit(s).

The Damaged Portion of the Dinosaur Fossilised Bone

The damaged dinosaur bone.

The damaged dinosaur bone.

Picture Credit: National Parks Service

The picture above shows the missing section of the dinosaur bone, the bone seems to have been deliberately smashed.

The Dinosaur National Monument is well-named.  Managed by the United States Department of the Interior National Parks Service, the park covers some 85,000 hectares and overlies the border between the states of Colorado and Utah (although the main dinosaur quarry site is in Utah, close to the town of Jenson).  The Monument is world famous for its amazing collection of dinosaur and other vertebrate fossils which date from the Upper Jurassic.  At least ten different types of dinosaur genera are known from the Morrison Formation exposures.  The Utah sequence represents high energy riverine deposits and on show at the visitor centre is a sandstone “wall” that reveals some 1,500 dinosaur bones.  Dinosaurs were probably swept away and drowned during floods.  At bends in the river as the current slowed down, so debris, including the carcases of dinosaurs was deposited.  The Dinosaur National Monument preserves these “log jams” of dinosaur bones.  Genera associated with the Monument include Camarasaurus, Allosaurus, Stegosaurus, Apatosaurus, Diplodocus and Dryosaurus.

On Tuesday, September 2nd , a park ranger was leading a tour party along the Fossil Discovery Trail when the damaged bone was noticed.  The vandalism and theft probably took place sometime between the Monday guided walk along the Fossil Discovery Trial and Tuesday morning.  The Fossil Discovery Trail is a 1.2 mile trail that runs between the Quarry Visitor Centre and the Quarry Exhibit Hall where the famous sandstone “wall”of dinosaur bones that we described above, is located.  The trail is unique as it is one of the few places where visitors can hike to see and touch dinosaur fossils and fragments in situ.  It allows visitors to experience what it may have been like for palaeontologist Earl Douglass (Carnegie Museum of Natural History), when he discovered the first fossils in what is now the Monument.

A spokes person from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“This is such a shame as the Dinosaur National Monument is going to celebrate its centenary next year and to have fossils damaged and stolen is deeply upsetting.  Although the fossils along the trail are of limited scientific value they provide a wonderful opportunity for members of the public to get up close to real dinosaur fossils.”

The Sauropod Humerus (before and after) Photographs

Two photographs showing the fossil before and after the theft.

Two photographs showing the fossil before and after the theft.

Picture Credit: National Parks Service

The picture above shows two photographs, the picture of the humerus without the damage (left) and a close up showing the damaged portion (right).  Although our dinosaur experts cannot be certain, the bone portion in question looks like the distal end of a left humerus, probably part of a Camarasaurus.  Park officials are seeking help from the public and anyone with information regarding this theft are invited to contact staff on (435) 781-7715.  A reward of $750 USD has been put up by the Intermountain Natural History Association for information that leads to a conviction.

The Part of the Fossil Discovery Trail where the Bone was Situated

The arrow shows the position of the damaged dinosaur bone.

The arrow shows the position of the damaged dinosaur bone.

Picture Credit: National Parks Service

Everything Dinosaur would like to take this opportunity to stress that visitors to the Dinosaur National Monument are not allowed to collect/damage any fossils or rocks.  Under Federal law, all features, artifacts and resources are protected. No collection of park geological resources for commercial sale, private collections or for classroom educational purposes is permitted.  We advise all visitors to National State Parks of America to familiarise themselves with the various protection laws and polices that relate to that particular location.

A Little Detail on a Great Big Dinosaur – Dreadnoughtus

Dreadnoughtus schrani – A Dinosaur on a Massive Scale

And so the announcement came this week about the discovery of a super-sized, South American dinosaur that weighed as much as thirteen, bull African elephants.  Dreadnoughtus was so named as the huge bones (and for a change when it comes to the Titanosauria, there are quite a lot of them), reminded the scientists of the impervious super-structure of turn-of-the-Century battleships.  This was a plant-eating dinosaur that was simply too big to be vulnerable to attack from predators.  Invulnerability would have been very handy for this immense creature as this dinosaur would have been preoccupied with eating, trying to cram enough calories into its enormous digestive system to keep its house-sized body functioning.

A Dinosaur on a Massive Scale - Dreadnoughtus schrani

Huge dinosaur from southern Patagonia.

Huge dinosaur from southern Patagonia.

Picture Credit: Jennifer Hall

Many articles have already been written about this new Titanosaur, the scientific paper was published by the Nature Publishing Group on the 4th September, this paper has already received more than 20,000 page views and the story has been picked up by dozens of news outlets.  We at Everything Dinosaur, had known about this research for some time, there are more exciting titanosaurid discoveries from South America still to be announced, so this blog article hopes to recap the main points about the significance of this study and to focus on a couple of areas that may not have been covered by other media outlets.

Firstly let’s deal with the size – this is a real “elephant in the room” moment, as with all large dinosaur fossils, this seems to be the most prominent and frequently asked question – just how big was this dinosaur?

The Size and Scale of the Dinosaur Discovery

Heavier than a 737 Jet.

Heavier than a 737 Jet.

Picture Credit: Dr. Ken Lacovara

Although D. schrani may not be the very biggest of all the dinosaurs that ever existed.  It is certainly right up there, with an estimated body mass of 59,300 kilogrammes (the actual measurement was 59,291 kilogrammes but some rounding has taken place in the media).

How do Scientists Estimate the Body Mass?

This leads us to one the most important points to note about this discovery.  The international research team led by Drexel University’s Dr. Kenneth Lacovara was able to recover around 45% of the total skeleton of a single individual specimen, including cranial material (skull bones).  Most of the rear portion of the animal was excavated including a left humerus (upper arm bone) and femur (thigh bone).  These limb bones hold the key to estimating body size.  Earlier studies have shown that an analysis of the these limb bones and measurements of their circumference, corresponds to relative body mass in terrestrial quadrupeds.

Put simply, imagine weighing several different herds of cows before they are slaughtered for meat.  The cows would be of different sizes and therefore there would be some variance in total body weights.  Once the cows had met their demise, the upper arm bones and thigh bones could be collected for each animal.  The mid shaft circumference for these bones would then be measured and recorded.  A correlation would most likely be found between the mid shaft circumference measurements and the body weight recorded earlier.  For instance, bigger circumference equals a heavier animal.

This correlation provides accurate data on the body mass estimates of four-limbed, terrestrial animals that are alive today.  So the theory goes, that if it works for animals that are extant (living today), then it should also work for extinct animals such as the Dinosauria.  This correlation is extremely useful as the Sauropods and the later Titanosaurs are so different from living creatures that anatomical comparisons are just not relevant.

The preservation of these limb bones which have been found to scale with body mass, permits the scientists to make an estimate of the body mass of Dreadnoughtus schrani.  The same equation has been used to estimate the body masses of a number of other substantial dinosaurs, but none of them quite match the bulk of Dreadnoughtus.  It therefore suggests that the Dreadnoughtus schrani holotype material represents an individual titanosaurid that was much heavier than other Titanosaurs and indeed much more massive than most other Sauropods.

Dreadnoughtus Compared to Other Sauropoda (Limb Circumference Analysis)

Dreadnoughtus - the most complete skeleton of a giant titanosaurid dinosaur discovered to date.

Dreadnoughtus – the most complete skeleton of a giant titanosaurid dinosaur discovered to date.

Table Credit: Everything Dinosaur, data compiled from Nature Publishing Group and Benson et al.

Still Growing?

Astonishingly, of the two specimens found together, the largest one, the Dreadnoughtus that was estimated to be heavier than a Boeing 737 aircraft was probably not yet fully grown.  Identifying when a dinosaur reached its maximum size is a complicated business (related to indeterminate growth), however, the research team found that it was likely that this super-sized dinosaur was still growing at the time of its death.  The scapula (shoulder blade) had not fused completely to the coracoid bone.  The posteromedial margin of the coracoid foramen (small opening, located in the middle of the coracoid), was butted up against the distal portion of the shoulder blade.  Palaeontologists have cited these conditions as indicating that the individual was still growing.  A study of the humerus supports this hypothesis, the lack of lines of arrested growth indicate that this dinosaur was immature at the time of death.  Although some scientists have questioned the validity of these indicators, whatever the outcome, the larger individual of the two Dreadnoughtus specimens found to date, represents the biggest dinosaur known to science for which a robust body mass has been calculated.

Not reported by many media sources but for the record the femur length is in excess of 1.9 metres and the humerus is 1.6 metres long.

Dinosaur Fossils Found in Southern Patagonia

Another, significant point we wanted to make concerns the location of the dinosaur fossils.  Whilst Patagonia may now be synonymous with dinosaur discoveries, Argentinosaurus, Giganotosaurus et al, many of these fossils come form the northern and central parts of this vast region.  These fossils come from a relatively unexplored part of south-western Patagonia.  The fossil material was excavated from the Cerro Fortaleza Formation, an exposure on the eastern bank of the Río La Leona, (Santa Cruz Province), this is more than 750 miles (1,200 kilometres) away from the location of other major Cretaceous-aged dinosaur fossil finds.  We at Everything Dinosaur are unaware of any radiometric dating and although Campanian-aged biostratigraphical material is associated with some horizons of the Cerro Fortaleza Formation, the precise age of these fossils remains unclear.  They are between 83 million and 66 million years old, with some sources stating 77 million years of age (Campanian to Maastrichtian faunal stages).

Location of the Dreadnoughtus Quarry

The site of the fossil discovery.

The site of the fossil discovery.

Picture Credit: Map de la provincia de Santa Cruz

A Team Effort

Last but not least, the 116 fossils, some of which do show potential evidence of scavenging by Theropod dinosaurs, have been excavated, prepared and digitally mapped by a dedicated team of researchers.  This has certainly been a colossal undertaking, yes, we know the tail itself measures some thirty feet in length, (the total length of Dreadnoughtus schrani has been estimated at 26 metres) and the skull (only one fragment of which has been found) was around eighty-eight centimetres in length.  It is quite right to focus on the huge size of this member of the Titanosaur family, but we at Everything Dinosaur would like to take this opportunity to thank all the researchers for their hard work.

The first fossil was spotted during a expedition back in 2005, the femur we think. From 2005 to 2009 a series of field trips took place to excavate the two individual specimens, since then a great deal of preparatory work and fossil prep has been carried out by scientists from Drexel University, a number of graduates from this institution but also with the aid and support of the likes of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History,  the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales, Argentina and Laboratorio de Paleovertebrados, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia (also Argentina).

Even a scientist from the University of Manchester (Dr. Victoria Egerton), a lecturer in Applied Palaeontology, was involved.   Our congratulations to everyone who has participated in this amazing study, an exceedingly rare opportunity to learn about one of the largest terrestrial vertebrates that is known to science.

Prehistoric Animal Tycoon Simulator Starts to Stir

 The Ultimate Tycoon Building Experience

The gaming world might be dominated by some industrial giants, but just as in the Jurassic, when the slow-moving Sauropods would have been occasionally startled by much smaller, more agile dinosaurs, the gaming leviathans can find themselves up against faster, sleeker and speedier developers.  Everything Dinosaur’s team members have been informed that an independent studio (Underdog Interactive), are working on a new simulator that intends to deliver the ultimate in tycoon building experiences.  The working title for this new prehistoric animal simulator is “Jurassic Planet”, but a new name is due to be announced shortly.

Gaming Thrills with Prehistoric Tycoon Simulator

One of the backgrounds for the game.

One of the backgrounds for the game.

Picture Credit: Max Wood

The project is being developed on the Unreal Engine 4 platform which boasts stunning graphics and powerful visuals.  Underdog Interactive, have big plans and they intend to make a mark on the game development environment about as big as the Chicxulub impact crater.  Currently the team is focusing on bringing the best possible graphics together with the most up to date fossil discoveries so that a spectacular and accurately depicted menagerie of prehistoric animals can feature.

Commenting on this fast-moving project, insider Max Wood stated:

“With the versatility of Unreal Engine 4, the team are looking to wow players with realistic graphics and to include game enhancing features such as Co-op missions and even the “dinosaur capture feature” inspired directly by the scene from the second Jurassic Park move – Lost World.”

Other projects such as Prehistoric Kingdom have been largely fan based projects, the difference here is that Jurassic Planet is a game development project and the talented team are working around the clock on making this game a reality.

Spinosaurid Rendering by Underdog Interactive

spinosaurid.

spinosaurid.

Picture Credit: Max Wood

Fresh Rockfalls at Monmouth Beach (Lyme Regis)

Warnings for Fossil Hunters at Lyme Regis

The cliffs that surround the picturesque town of Lyme Regis in Dorset on England’s famous “Jurassic Coast” are very treacherous.  Rockfalls and landslips are a relatively common occurrence and team members at Everything Dinosaur, have done much to help inform and to warn visitors to the area of the potential hazards.  Fossil collecting or simply exploring the beaches can be a lot of fun, but the recent cliff fortification and shore stability measures put in place by the local council will not solve the problem of the unstable geology of the area.   The cliffs are composed of relatively loose sediment, that when saturated after heavy rain or somewhat dried out after a prolonged spell without too much precipitation, are prone to rockfalls.  It is always advisable to stay well away from the base of the cliffs, fossil collecting on a falling tide helps, as this gives an increasing distance between the sea and the cliffs.

Dangerous Cliffs at Lyme Regis

Good idea to go fossil collecting on a falling tide and to keep away from the steep cliffs.

Good idea to go fossil collecting on a falling tide and to keep away from the steep cliffs.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Recently, we were sent some photographs by Lyme Regis fossil expert, Brandon Lennon.  The photographs showed a rockfall that had taken place on Monmouth beach (to the west of Lyme Regis).  Brandon explained that he had observed a number of cliff falls this year and that he expected more to occur as the autumn weather sets in.   This particular rockfall had occurred on that area of the beach famous for its extensive ammonite and nautiloid fossils preserved within the blue lias limestones – an area known as the “Ammonite Pavement” or the “Ammonite Graveyard”.

Recent Rockfall at Monmouth Beach

Rockfall onto the Ammonite Pavement on Monmouth Beach.

Rockfall onto the Ammonite Pavement on Monmouth Beach.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A supervised, fossil collecting walk is one of the best ways to explore the beaches around Lyme Regis, for further information on such tours: Fossil Walks in the Lyme Regis Area

Perhaps if you are lucky enough to go on a field trip with Brandon to Monmouth beach, you might be able to hear the theories that have been proposed to help explain why so many large ammonite fossils are found together at this spot.

Everything Dinosaur was sent a beautiful piece of fossilised wood from nearby Portland.  The specimen still had the bark preserved on it and when polished in section, growth rings could still be made out. We think that the fossil represents an Araucaria spp. (monkey puzzle tree).  This fossilised wood dates from the Upper Jurassic.  Fossil wood can occasionally be found on the beaches of Lyme Regis and nearby Charmouth, but this is usually much older dating mainly from the Lower Jurassic.

A Polished Section of Fossilised Wood

A polished section of fossilised wood.

A polished section of fossilised wood.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Remember if fossil collecting, be careful out there.

Dinosaurs Provide Rapid Dispatch

Everything Dinosaur Promotes Rapid Dispatch

Our customers know all about our rapid dispatch of parcels, our speedy service has been commented upon over 1,000 times on Everything Dinosaur’s website but we ourselves don’t very often mention it.  It’s not that we are hiding our light under a bushel, but for Everything Dinosaur’s team members, we are just so used to getting things packed and dispatched as quickly as we can.  We appreciate that once an order has been placed, customer communication does not end there.  We always contact customers to let them know that their order has been received and when it is going to be dispatched, we like to give these assurances.  As many of us shop on line as well we know how important it is to be kept informed.

Same Day Dispatch Monday to Friday with Everything Dinosaur

Prompt service and rapid dispatch of orders from Everything Dinosaur.

Prompt service and rapid dispatch of orders from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Whilst writing this article, we were interrupted by a phone call from a customer (other team members were grabbing lunch at the time).  The customer had telephoned as they were planning a party for their little boy, but they had been let down over deliveries from some mail order companies in the past.  We are always saddened to hear things like this, however, within a few minutes, the customer’s party order had been packed and prepared for dispatch.  It will be on its way this afternoon and the customer should receive her party favours and dinosaur items tomorrow.  An email was sent just to reassure the customer that her order had been prepared and that it was ready to go out.

Everything Dinosaur team members do try their best.  Very occasionally a parcel can be lost in the delivery networks that we use, this can be frustrating but at least our customers know that once having placed an order with us, parcels are rapidly prepared and made ready for dispatch.  Speedy dinosaurs whatever next!

Try us for yourselves visit: Everything Dinosaur for all your dinosaur and prehistoric animal product needs.

New School Curriculum With Rocks, Fossils and Dinosaurs

New Curriculum – New Challenges For Teaching Teams

This week sees the introduction of the new national curriculum for school children in England.  A more “rigorous” curriculum with English, Mathematics and Science as core subjects with pupils at Key Stage 1 (five to seven years old) being introduced to simple fractions and even computer programming.  The aim of this new curriculum which is being rolled out across all state-funded primary and secondary schools, is to improve standards.  However, academies, which now form the majority of secondary schools, will not be required to follow the new curriculum.  State funded schools in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are managed differently but current policies and practices are being reviewed in many parts of the British Isles.

Why the Changes?

The Department for Education, responsible for children’s’ services and education in England, cites falling academic standards when students in England are compared to students from other countries, particular countries such as Singapore, South Korea and China.  From Everything Dinosaur’s perspective, our teaching work aims to help promote the concept of working scientifically and we deal with classes ranging from EYFS (Early Years Foundation Stage) right up to Key Stage 4 (students from fourteen to sixteen years).  A number of comparative studies have been undertaken and just like schools themselves, the results vary.  For example, back in 2012 Everything Dinosaur team members reported on the biannual comparative study carried out by researchers at Boston College (USA), which covers the results from two very important international teaching studies, the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) and the trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).  Broadly, the United Kingdom had shown good progress when it came to mathematics but standards seemed to be slipping when it came to the sciences.

Teaching about Dinosaurs and Fossils in School – Working Scientifically

Lots of facts about dinosaurs.

Lots of facts about dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A topic all about dinosaurs, fossils and extinction helps to bring together core teaching subjects such as science, English and mathematics.

To read more about the study: Mixed Results for Science and Maths in English Schools

 Where does Everything Dinosaur Come In?

With the emphasis on scientific knowledge, conceptual understanding and learning about scientific methods, dinosaurs as a term topic or part of a special science themed teaching week is a great way to engage young minds at Key Stage 1 and earlier.  As children tend to have a fascination with prehistoric animals, our dinosaur workshops help to introduce and reinforce learning objectives as outlined by the new curriculum.  Lower Key Stage 2 have to learn about fossils, how they are formed and what they tell us about the once living things that they represent.   As one of our colleagues declared “Mary Anning is on the curriculum” – great to see a female role model in science.

Older students  in Key Stage 3 and heading up to Key Stage 4 are being given the opportunity to study genetics, evolution and the work of such notable scientists as Darwin and Wallace.

Teachers and their support providers have been working hard to get to grips with this new “rigorous” curriculum.  We are aware that some of the teaching resources related to dinosaurs and fossils used in the past are in some cases out of date, or worse still inaccurate. Everything Dinosaur offers lots of free, downloadable prehistoric animal themed teaching resources from its bespoke teaching website, as well as helpful articles, tips, advice and the opportunity to invite our dinosaur experts into school.

To visit Everything Dinosaur’s teaching website: Everything Dinosaur’s Website For Schools

A Teaching Exercise – Our Hands versus the Hands of a Dinosaur

Examining Dinosaur Hands (Key Stage 2/3)

Examining Dinosaur Hands (Key Stage 2/3)

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In terms of teaching resources, Everything Dinosaur team members have been advising learning support providers about all sorts of prehistoric animal related merchandise – from finger puppets to science kits.  All the resources we supply have been tested and reviewed by our own teaching team, there’s even free dinosaur fact sheets included as well.

Resources for schools: Teaching Resources for Schools

Here’s to that dedicated group of professionals who serve our school children so well and we wish all the students starting the new curriculum every success with their studies.

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