Category: Teaching

Year 2 Send Thank You Letters to Everything Dinosaur

Schoolchildren Say Thanks after Dinosaur Workshop

Earlier this month, a team member from Everything Dinosaur visited Southglade Primary School to deliver a dinosaur workshop in support of Year two’s study topic all about dinosaurs.  As part of our follow up support for the teaching team, we discussed extension ideas and emailed over further resources to assist the enthusiastic teachers with their scheme of work.

One of the things discussed was to encourage the children with their writing by asking them to write a thank you letter to Everything Dinosaur.  Sure enough, a couple of days ago we received a big envelope  from Mrs Hyland containing a super set of letters.  We have enjoyed reading them all and we have posted them up onto a notice board in our warehouse.

What a Lot of Thank You Letters we Received!

Year 2 pupils send in thank you letters to Everything Dinosaur.

Year 2 pupils send in thank you letters to Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Southglade Primary School

 The children had taken great care in how they laid out their letters.  There was lots of proper addressing on display, some super, clear writing as well as effective use of punctuation.  Many of the children had incorporated some amazing vocabulary as well, words like “appreciate” and “sincerely” occasionally trip us up, so to see them used in a letter from a seven year old and spelled correctly too was fantastic!

Lots of Fantastic Letters to Read

Thank you note from Alina.

Thank you note from Alina.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Alina

Dinosaur Mike who visited the school to conduct the dinosaur and fossil themed workshop exclaimed:

“We had so many letters from the children that we had to find a big space in our warehouse to lay them all out so we could take a photograph.  My colleagues and I really enjoyed reading them and I was delighted to see just how many facts that Year 2 had remembered.”

Keira, Aiden, Ella, Amr, Joy and Theo liked looking at the fossil teeth best, whilst Jude, Alex, Grace and Ewan enjoyed learning all about Triceratops.  For Tyler and Lexi-Mai they were delighted to hear all about Tylosaurus and Lexivosaurus, prehistoric animals that have names that are like their own.

Dinosaur Themed Thank You Letter

A thank you letter from Year 2.

A thank you letter from Year 2.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Aimee

Jayden, the other little boy called Theo, Milly, Kai and Demi-Lea all wanted to know whether Everything Dinosaur will be coming back to their school to teach about dinosaurs and fossils.

Young Aimee wrote:

“Thank you for travelling to our school from a long way away today.  I was excited because we all love dinosaurs.  The fossils that we touched all felt cold and hard and I liked moving around making gigantic steps just like a dinosaur.”

Ezekiel, Gracie-Jai, Amira and  Shantel asked how our dinosaur expert came to know so much about dinosaurs?  That’s easy, he had a really enthusiastic teacher at school just like the children in Year 2.

Heasandford Primary School Year 1 – Dinosaurs

Lower Key Stage 1 Study Dinosaurs

Year 1 children at Heasandford Primary school in Lancashire have been studying dinosaurs this term and all three classrooms had lots of dinosaur themed displays.  Everything Dinosaur was invited into the school to conduct a series of dinosaur and prehistoric animal workshops with the three classes of Year 1 pupils.  One of the first things seen as we discussed the intended teaching outcomes for the day, was a clever display posted up in one of the classrooms that showed the differences between fiction and non-fiction texts.

Learning All About Different Types of Books

Helping to learn the difference between fiction and non-fiction texts

Helping to learn the difference between fiction and non-fiction texts

Picture Credit: Heasandford Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

Using dinosaurs as a template to help the children to learn about different types of books is very clever.  During the course of the term topic, the Year 1 children were given plenty of opportunities to undertake creative writing.  In addition, the children were challenged to produce their own fact books based on their favourite dinosaurs.  Our dinosaur expert spent some time over lunch looking at one of these dinosaur fact books that had been produced.  Allosaurus seems to have been this budding young palaeontologist’s favourite dinosaur, there was even a model of Allosaurus made from green tissue included in the book, along with lots of prehistoric animal facts and dinosaur drawings.  With the aid of one of the enthusiastic teaching assistants, some children had even taken photographs of fossils.  We compared these pictures with some photographs of fossils in a magazine that we just happened to have with us.

Children Produce Non-Fiction Texts All About Dinosaurs

Colourful books all about dinosaurs demonstrate lots of independent learning.

Colourful books all about dinosaurs demonstrate lots of independent learning.

Picture Credit: Heasandford Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

Some of the children had even brought dinosaur toys to show our expert.  Some of these proved to be just the job when it came to explaining about different types of dinosaur such as Apatosaurus and Triceratops.  This Burnley based school is one of the largest primary schools in England.  There are twenty-one classes at the moment, and the size and scale of the school enables it to be at the very heart of the local community.  With each Year group being made up of three classes, this sets the dedicated teaching team some challenges but there was plenty of evidence to demonstrate that despite the large numbers of children at the school, there was a really strong cohesion between all the classes.  The teaching teams and their learning support providers co-ordinate schemes of work to ensure that every pupil has the opportunity to learn in a safe, stimulating and enthusiastic environment.  For example, all three classes had produced some wonderful silhouette paintings of different prehistoric animals as the children explored different types of media.  These paintings made very colourful displays.

Colourful Paintings on Display

Effective use of different media.

Effective use of different media.

Picture Credit: Heasandford Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

One of the benefits of having an expert from Everything Dinosaur visit, is that there is an opportunity to discuss extension activities to help support learning.  Whilst one class was outside busy calculating the length of a Stegosaurus, we took the chance to explore one of the dinosaur museums that the children had created in the classrooms.  There was lots of evidence on display of the varied and stimulating activities that the children had been undertaking.

One of the Dinosaur Museums in a Classroom

Year 1 classes create their own dinosaur museums.

Year 1 classes create their own dinosaur museums.

Picture Credit: Heasandford Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

As part of our follow up work with the school we emailed over some further information on the prehistoric animals that the children had learned about over the course of the day.  We even set them one or two of our special “pinkie palaeontologist challenges”, one of which included comparing Tyrannosaurus rex teeth to bananas, a great way to support the numeracy elements of the teaching scheme of work.  Could the children produce a table of their results?  Could they create a graph and plot the data?

Dinosaurs Roam at John Locke Academy

EYFS Children Learn All About Dinosaurs at John Locke Academy

It has been a busy and exciting term for the children at John Locke Academy.  Early Years Foundation Stage have been learning all about dinosaurs with the help and support of the enthusiastic teaching team at this new school, which was only opened last September.  The Spring Term topic was entitled “Stomp, Stomp, Roar” and there were some very colourful displays of the children’s work posted up in the spacious classrooms.  A Reception class had even set up their very own dinosaur museum and the fossil expert from Everything Dinosaur who visited the school to conduct Foundation Stage dinosaur workshops, was lucky enough to be given a guided tour.

Visit our Dinosaur Museum (Reception Class)

Come visit our dinosaur museum

Come visit our dinosaur museum

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/John Locke Academy

The children’s interest in all things prehistoric had been sparked by the discovery of some strange and very large eggs. What sort of creature could have laid eggs so big?  This was one of the questions posed by the teachers, all part of an exciting, learning through play focused curriculum which is currently being rolled out across the Foundation Stage (Nursery and Reception).  Using the giant eggs as a stimulus, the teaching team encouraged the children to explore what sort of animals alive today lay eggs and to make links between the size of the eggs and the size of the animal that could have laid them.  Could a dinosaur have visited their school?

“Egg-citing” Discovery Made in the Classroom

Dinosaur eggs made from a balloon covered in paper mache.

Dinosaur eggs made from a balloon covered in paper mache.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/John Locke Academy

Dinosaurs as a term topic had certainly enthused teachers and children alike.  Prehistoric animals such as Stegosaurus, Triceratops and the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex are rarely out of the media spotlight these days, as our dinosaur expert pointed out when he explained that a new dinosaur species is, on average, named and described every thirty days or so.  The children demonstrated a remarkable level of knowledge, some of the Nursery class knew about geological periods and which dinosaurs lived in them.  In addition, the children were keen to point out which dinosaurs ate meat and which ones ate plants.

With all the wonderful examples of writing the children had produced, they needed somewhere to display them all, so one part of the dinosaur museum had been set aside as an area for showcasing all the books about prehistoric animals that the children had written.

Dinosaur Books Written by FS2 On Display

"Stomp, stomp, roar"!  Reception class make books about dinosaurs.

“Stomp, stomp, roar”! Reception class make books about dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/John Locke Academy

The nursery children too, had created some wonderful and very informative dinosaur themed displays, all good examples of learning through imaginative, creative play.   If you are going to have a dinosaur museum in the classroom, then just like any other museum it might be a good idea to have a set of “Golden Rules” for visitors to follow.  The children were so engrossed in the idea of their very own classroom museum that they had drafted a set of rules to help guide visitors. This certainly demonstrates the children’s ability to apply what they had been learning to an appreciation of the wider world.

“Golden Rules” Designed for the Classroom Dinosaur Museum

Children design rules for their dinosaur museum.

Children design rules for their dinosaur museum.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/John Locke Academy

The concept of learning through exploring, developing ideas and allowing the children the freedom to challenge themselves is certainly a philosophy that John Locke himself, would have approved of.  There was lots of evidence on display demonstrating that this new school is certainly meeting learning needs, allowing the children the opportunity to fulfil their potential in a rich, diverse environment with plenty of support.

As part of the topic, the children in the two Reception classes have been working on a number of writing exercises, all aimed at helping them to develop their competence and to expand their vocabularies.  The visitor from Everything Dinosaur was presented with a large number of  questions that the children had written in preparation for the dinosaur workshop.  There were so many excellent examples that our expert had to use part of the school hall to lay them out so they could be photographed.

Dinosaur Topic Aims to Develop Writing Skills

Encouraging FS2 to write about dinosaurs.

Encouraging FS2 to write about dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/John Locke Academy

All in all, the topic entitled “Stomp, Stomp, Roar”, has been a “roaring success”, for the Academy.  A topic that has been enthusiastically embraced by children and teachers alike.  The children certainly enjoyed the Foundation Stage dinosaur workshops.

International Women’s Day 2015

Recognising the Role of Women in Science and Education

Today, March 8th is International Women’s Day.  A day for celebrating the role of women in society and for championing the continuing struggle for equality.  Although, the origins of this special day go back to pre World War One, the fight to recognise the role of women in society continues and we at Everything Dinosaur, with our female boss, take time out to recognise the immense contribution of women to the Earth Sciences and science teaching.  Our team members have been lucky enough to have worked with some of the most enthusiastic and engaging science teachers in the country.  This dedicated group, many of which, at the Primary School level at least are women, are tasked with enthusing and motivating the next generation of scientists.

Take for example, Miss Sparre, a Primary School teacher we met last week.  As part of her mixed Year 1/FS2 classes’s study of dinosaurs they had turned part of the classroom into a dinosaur museum.  The children were eager to show off their museum to our fossil expert who had come to the school to conduct a dinosaur workshop.

A Science Museum in the Classroom

Come to our dinosaur museum!

Come to our dinosaur museum!

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Young Megan, (aged five), had been to the “Jurassic Coast” of Dorset and found lots of amazing Ammonite and Belemnite fossils, she was delighted to be able to explain what the fossils mean and we presented her with a drawing of what an Ammonite looked like when it swam in the Mesozoic seas.  The contribution to science and education by women has been immense and with enthusiastic young Megan explaining that she too, wants to be a palaeontologist, the important role of women in science is set to continue.

A Trip to the Bathonian

The Bathonian Stage of the Middle Jurassic

Just like a book is divided up into chapters so geological time is divided up into a series of units.  There are Eons, Eras, Periods, Epochs, and faunal stages, these are the typical units of division when it comes to exploring the geological timescale.  A point reinforced when a team member from Everything Dinosaur made a visit to Somerset recently.

Descending order of size for the units of the geological timescale (deep time):

  • Eon for example, the Phanerozoic (visible life) from 542 mya to the present day.
  • Era for example, the Mesozoic, from 251 mya to 65 mya) or thereabouts.
  • Period, for example, the Jurassic (199 mya to 145 mya) approximately.
  • Epochs, for example, the Middle Jurassic (175 mya -161 mya) approximately.
  • Stages or Ages such as the Bathonian (167.7 mya to 164.7 mya) approximately.

We mention this, as whilst working with Year 6 children and their teachers in the Bath area, we explained that the limestone rocks in their part of the world, were used as building materials and have been quarried for centuries.  Many of the buildings around the school, and the walls of the school were constructed using these limestones.  These limestones are the preserved remains of the shells of ancient sea creatures, that lived during the Jurassic.  The Bathonian faunal stage was named after the spa town of Bath and the limestone found in this part of south-western England.  It was included in scientific literature as early as 1843.  A number of Ammonite species are recognised from this Middle Jurassic strata and they help to provide a biostratigraphic profile and assist with relative ageing of the rocks.  Bathonian rocks have provided a number of dinosaur fossil remains including Sauropods, armoured dinosaurs, meat-eaters and even a distant relative of the most famous dinosaur of all Tyrannosaurus rex (Proceratosaurus).

Typical Bathonian Limestones used as Local Building Materials

A faunal stage of the Middle Jurassic named after the spa town of Bath.

A faunal stage of the Middle Jurassic named after the spa town of Bath.

It was a nice moment to ask the school children did they want to see something from the Jurassic?  When they all said yes, we simply asked them to look out of the window.

EYFS at Purston Infant School Learn All About Dinosaurs

Foundation Unit Studies Dinosaurs

It was an exciting Friday for the children at the Foundation Unit at Purston Infant School (West Yorkshire) as yesterday, they had a visit from Everything Dinosaur to help them learn all about dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals.  The two classes of Lower Foundation Stage along with the two classes of Upper Foundation Stage have been learning about dinosaurs and there was lots of colourful artwork on display around the classrooms.

One of the Colourful Dinosaur Inspired Displays at the School

Colourful prehistoric animals.

Colourful prehistoric animals.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The children have two beautiful, giant dinosaur eggs to look after.  Both the eggs were made from paper mache.  In discussion, with the teaching team we suggested that an extension activity could involve the children thinking about what sort of animals lay eggs/do not lay eggs.  Perhaps a classroom display could be created with the children being encouraged to list the types of animals they know that lay eggs.  Can the children sort and group the animals that they have thought of?  For example, those with scales, those with feathers, those that can fly etc.  What might a dinosaur nest be made off?  Can the children sort out different types of material and work out which materials would be good/would not be good to line a nest for a dinosaur egg?

A Giant Dinosaur Egg in a Classroom

A big, blue dinosaur egg.

A big, blue dinosaur egg.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Under the enthusiastic tutelage of the teachers and their support staff the children were certainly enjoying this term topic and there was lots of evidence on display of the children enjoying a broad based, varied activity topic.  The Lower Foundation Stage children had a wonderful sensory bin filled with sand and small stones as well as dinosaur skeletons for them to explore.  In addition, dinosaur models had been made using all sorts of household odds and ends, helping the children to learn about the properties of different materials.  The older children in the two Upper Foundation Stage classes (Monkeys 1 and Monkeys 2) had been busy painting their favourite dinosaurs and there was lots of expressive artwork posted up around the classroom as well as plenty of evidence of vocabulary development.

During the dinosaur workshops with the children, our dinosaur expert encouraged the children’s confidence with counting by introducing simple dinosaur fossil themed counting activities all developed with the aim of helping the budding young palaeontologists to improve their confidence in counting and their understanding of numbers.

Enabling Children to Explore and Play Using a Wide Range of Media

Using different media, important in learning and development.

Using different media, important in learning and development.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Our dinosaur expert, promised to email over some more extension resources to help support the scheme of work prepared by the dedicated teaching team, one of whom stated “the children were very responsive and enjoyed looking at all the resources”.

Exploring Dinosaurs at Hadfield Infant School

Foundation Stage/Year 1/Year 2 Study Dinosaurs and Fossils

Children at Hadfield Infant School have had a busy day learning all about dinosaurs, fossils and life in the past.  The children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 have started a term topic all about prehistoric animals.  Some of the children found a “dinosaur egg” in their classroom, what type of dinosaur could have laid such a big egg?

The egg had started to hatch and sure enough, the children had a baby dinosaur to look after.  We hope that they will learn all about dinosaur plant-eaters and meat-eaters so that they can work out what to feed it!

The Dinosaur Egg in One of the Classrooms

Schoolchildren discover dinosaur egg.

Schoolchildren discover dinosaur egg.

Picture Credit: Hadfield Infant School/Everything Dinosaur

What would happen if the baby dinosaur escaped one evening?  Where would the dinosaur go?  Can the children follow the dinosaur’s travels around the world?

Our dinosaur expert felt very much at home at the school today.  On the wall in the hall where he had been working was a big picture with lots of bones in it.  The children learned that scientists look at the fossilised bones of dinosaurs so that they can work out what they looked like and how they lived.

A Great Backdrop for a Dinosaur Workshop

Learning all about fossil bones of dinosaurs.

Learning all about fossil bones of dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Hadfield Infant School/Everything Dinosaur

With the enthusiastic support of the teaching team the children will have a wonderful and engaging topic to study up to the end of the spring term.  There were so many amazing questions asked during the day, questions such as what was the biggest crocodile of all time?  How big were the plates on the back of Stegosaurus?  Good job the children had been working on their phonics to help them work out the difference between big, bigger and biggest.

We sent over some extension resources to help the teaching team answer some of the questions that we did  not get round to in our dinosaur workshop.  We think this term topic is going to be a “roaring success”!

Bamford Academy Foundation Stage Study Dinosaurs

Chicks and Ducklings Learn All About Dinosaurs

For children in the Chicks and Ducklings classes at Bamford Academy, this term has been a very busy one as they have been learning all about dinosaurs, fossils  and life in prehistoric times. There were lots of colourful dinosaur themed artwork on display in the classroom and the budding young palaeontologists had looked at dinosaur eggs and pinned up many different types of prehistoric animals on the classroom’s “WOW” wall.

Class 1 and 2 Have Discovered That There Were Many Different Types of Prehistoric Animal

Lots of different extinct animals on display.

Lots of different extinct animals on display.

Picture Credit: Bamford Academy/Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur’s fossil expert who visited the school was shown where the volcanoes were in the picture and another very knowledgeable child pointed out that dinosaurs laid eggs.  During the tactile dinosaur workshop we looked at describing words for dinosaurs and fossils.  Real fossils feel cold and hard and some fossils can be really heavy.  When it came to considering appropriate describing words for a jawbone from a Triceratops, the children came up with words like “large” and “massive”, it took three of us to carry the jaw round to show the class, our expert was reliably informed that the teeth of Triceratops feel rough!.

The children were keen to take part and we had lots of describing words volunteered, one little girl, stated that the tooth of “Tyrannosaurus rex was gigantic!”

Lots of Evidence on Display of Activities to Develop Vocabularies

Lots of describing words for dinosaurs on display.

Lots of describing words for dinosaurs on display.

Picture Credit: Bamford Academy/Everything Dinosaur

A key theme of the teaching topic had been comparing our bodies to those of dinosaurs.  The enthusiastic teaching team had come up with a very creative way of demonstrating how big T. rex was.  A drawing of the three-toed print of a Tyrannosaurus rex was made and the children counted how many pairs of their shoes would it take to fill up the footprint.  The feet of some dinosaurs were very big and it was wonderful to see such a thoughtful method used to demonstrate just how large some dinosaurs were.

Working out the Size and Scale of Some Dinosaurs

Measuring and comparing.

Measuring and comparing.

Picture Credit: Bamford Academy/Everything Dinosaur

Some dinosaurs really did make enormous footprints.  The very biggest dinosaurs made footprints so large that if the track was filled with water a member of Chicks or Ducklings class could have had a bath in it?

Getting to Grip with Dinosaur Footprints

Potential Tyrannosaurid Print

Potential tyrannosaurid Print

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above shows one of Everything Dinosaur’s chums with a fossil footprint that could have been made by Tyrannosaurus rex.  The picture was taken in America (United States) and the children learned during the workshop that the big dinosaur fossil that was kept in the heavy, wooden box also came from America.

We looked at plant-eaters as well as meat-eaters and the children were keen to demonstrate their knowledge as to what Triceratops and other dinosaurs ate.  It is a pity that we did not have any Stegosaurus fossils to show the children as there was a lovely, friendly Stegosaurus painted on one of the walls outside the classroom area.   The teaching team had encouraged the children to decorate the plates that ran along this dinosaur’s back and the children had also measured how long this dinosaur was by comparing it to the size of their own hands.

Measuring a Stegosaurus

How many hands?

How many hands?

Picture Credit: Bamford Academy/Everything Dinosaur

Dinosaurs as a term topic has certainly proved to be very popular with the children and it was clear that a very effective, creative and challenging scheme of work for this topic had been prepared by the teaching team.

Seabirds and Pterosaurs with Reception

Reception Class Stomping Like Dinosaurs and their Dinosaur Exhibit

Another busy day for Reception class at Eaton Primary School as they have been studying dinosaurs and other animals that lived long ago.  Our dinosaur expert was very impressed with the colourful dinosaur drawings that had been posted up around the classroom.  Under the expert tutelage of teacher Mrs Duffell, ably supported by Miss Parker (Teaching Assistant), the children had been learning together, helping each other to explore prehistoric animals.  Reception class had learned about fossils and how some of them are formed, they had used charcoal to create some very decorative Ammonite fossil drawings, it was helpful to have Ammonite fossils available for the children to handle.  Some wonderful use of vocabulary as the eager young palaeontologists explored how fossils felt.

There were some very confident counters as the class compared the size of their hands to the footprints of various dinosaurs.  Our dinosaur expert, who had visited the school for the morning, also had his hand measured.  He was told that some dinosaurs had small feet and left small footprints, whilst other dinosaurs had massive feet and left massive, huge footprints.  A lovely example of children using language to express ideas and demonstrate understanding.

A special dinosaur shop/exhibit had been set up in a corner of the classroom, a great location for role play.  Hanging above this area was a wonderful model of a seabird, that reminded our dinosaur expert of a Pterosaur (flying reptile).  Pterosaurs were not dinosaurs, but they were related to the group of reptiles called the Dinosauria.  Many Pterosaurs adapted to life in marine habitats and just like many seabirds today, they hunted fish.  Whilst the big Ammonites under the water caught fish, flying over the waves Pterosaurs were on the lookout for any fish foolish enough to swim close to the surface.

The seabird model, reminded us of the Pterosaur called Guidraco, a flying reptile whose fossils have been found in China.  The name of this flying reptile translates as “malicious ghost dragon”, with those sharp teeth even the most slippery fish would not escape.

Comparing the Model Seabird to a Pterosaur

Comparing a seabird to a flying reptile.

Comparing a seabird to a flying reptile.

Picture Credit: Eaton Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

When it came to designing the Guidraco replica, it was suggested that since this animal lived in a marine habitat, perhaps it should be coloured in a similar way to a Puffin.  The colourful crest on the Pterosaur reminds us of the large, colourful beak of the seabird that hangs over the dinosaur shop area.  Both Puffins and Guidraco Pterosaurs ate fish and the big teeth of the Pterosaur are quite impressive, but not as big as those of a meat-eating dinosaur like Tyrannosaurus rex.

A challenge was set, could the young palaeontologists work out how big a T. rex tooth was?  Could they answer the question which was bigger a Tyrannosaurus rex tooth or a banana?  No doubt the Reception class will have fun with this investigation and perhaps they can think of creative ways in which they could display the information.

To conclude the visit, the children performed their dinosaur stomping song, lots of fierce dinosaur expressions all around the classroom.

Dinosaurs Helping Reception

Dinosaurs Help Reception with Vocabulary and Maths

Children in Reception class at St Michael and St John’s R.C. school have been learning all about dinosaurs this term.  With the enthusiastic help of teachers Mrs Collinge, Mrs Clarkson and teaching assistants Mrs Venguedasalon and Mrs Lambert the budding young palaeontologists have been designing their very own dinosaurs and creating lots of very colourful artwork.  The children have been exploring some of the vocabulary associated with prehistoric animals, there was plenty of evidence of meat-eaters, plant-eaters and other terms related to animals, habitats and food chains.

Imaginative, Creative Dinosaurs on Display

Colourful dinosaurs including a "Spikeosaurus".

Colourful dinosaurs including a “Spikeosaurus”.

Picture Credit: St Michael and St John’s R.C. School/Everything Dinosaur

The children had designed their own dinosaur and a number of very imaginative creations were on show, surrounding a large, red “Spikosaurus” with its green spotted tail.  Reception class has thought hard about the sort of questions they would like answers to as they explored dinosaurs and part of the children’s display featured post-it notes with questions the children had written.

Questions All About Dinosaurs

All about dinosaurs.

All about dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: St Michael and St John’s R.C. School/Everything Dinosaur

Care had been taken with the use of capital letters and full stops and it was clear that phonics sounds had helped the pupils to write their questions down as they considered how to design their very own dinosaur.  There were many examples around the classroom demonstrating how literacy aims had been woven into the prehistoric animal themed teaching activities.  Numeracy and confidence with numbers had also been carefully considered as part of the scheme of work.  Part of classroom had been dedicated to a dinosaur themed addition and subtraction area, with pictures of Triceratops, Apatosaurus and other dinosaurs being used to help the children familiarise themselves with terms associated with adding and taking away.

Dinosaurs Explore Numeracy

Subtracting dinosaurs

Subtracting dinosaurs

Picture Credit: St Michael and St John’s R.C. School/Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur had visited the school in support of the term topic, conducting a morning of activities with Reception and Class Three.  Both classrooms were covered in examples of the children’s work. Class Three had compiled an impressive timeline which explained key developments in the history of human civilisation.  Our visit helped to reinforce learning as these Lower Key Stage 2 children explored rocks and fossils.  One little boy in Class Three even brought in a lovely fossil of a fish and some of the Reception children showed us their dinosaur books.

We had a great time helping the children learn about life in the past and how fossils form, the school is certainly a vibrant, dynamic learning environment.

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