All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Teaching

Everything Dinosaur team members working in schools, helping museums and other educational bodies. Our work with and in schools.

22 04, 2017

The Tactile Nature of a Schleich Brachiosaurus

By | April 22nd, 2017|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

The Schleich Brachiosaurus and Creative Play

The recently introduced Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model is proving to be a big hit amongst teachers and teaching assistants who work with Foundation Stage children and those children in Year 1.  The model, which measures around thirty-two centimetres in length and stands a fraction under twenty centimetres high is an ideal size for little hands to handle and the dinosaur is sturdy enough to withstand the attentions of even the most enthusiastic, budding palaeontologist during creative play.

The Schleich Brachiosaurus Dinosaur Model

Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model.

The Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model (2017).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Suitable Dinosaur Models for Early Years Foundation Stage 

Children in Foundation Stage (Nursery and Reception) will be mostly learning through games and creative play activities, although in Reception classes (Foundation Stage 2), by the beginning of the summer term, many schools will be introducing more structured learning routines to help prepare the children for the greater emphasis on cognitive abilities which comes with Year 1.  One of the key areas of learning is to help children to develop language and communication skills, as well as learning about the properties of materials (understanding the world).  The Schleich Brachiosaurus model has a roughened texture over part of the dinosaur’s body.  Other areas are smooth, as a result, the figure is ideal for exploring how different objects feel.

The Beautiful Texture on the Schleich Brachiosaurus

The texture on the neck and shoulders of the Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model.

The beautiful texture of the Schleich Brachiosaurus is ideal for creative play.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Looking at the Properties of Different Materials

Dinosaur toys and models are a source of fascination for both young boys and girls.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur use an assortment of dinosaur models and figures in their outreach work with children, particularly those children in Year 1 and Foundation Stage.  The tactile, kinaesthetic quality of the Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur makes it ideal, as the children feel the model’s rough scales and smooth skin.  We also use this Schleich dinosaur model to help children learn and remember the names for different parts of the body and to compare our bodies to that of a dinosaur.

Can You See His Eyes?  How Many Eyes Does the Dinosaur Have?

The Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model.

The tactile quality of a Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Schleich model is ideal for exploring parts of the body with young children at Foundation Stage and Year 1.  Can they point to the teeth?  Where’s the dinosaur’s tongue?  Can you count the dinosaur’s toes?

To view the range of Schleich prehistoric animal models including the robust, sturdy Schleich Brachiosaurus figure: Schleich Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animal Models

The Schleich Brachiosaurus dinosaur model has a very tactile nature, a result of the carefully moulded scales on various parts of the body.  It is a robust and sturdy dinosaur model, ideal for use when working with EYFS (Early Years Foundation Stage).

28 03, 2017

EYFS Become Palaeontologists for a Morning

By | March 28th, 2017|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Foundation Stage Children Study Dinosaurs

Another busy day for the team members at Everything Dinosaur.  Children in the Foundation Stage classes (Nursery and Reception), at Saint Thomas C of E Primary have been learning all about dinosaurs and fossils.  Everything Dinosaur was invited into the school to work with the two classes over the course of the morning.  This well-appointed school conducts lots of outreach activities with its pupils, the children certainly get the opportunity to experience a wide variety of curriculum related activities.  The hall had been set aside for our visit, after all, some fossils can be quite big, or even “massive” as pointed out by a child in Nursery when we looked at the best way to describe fossils.

Using a Big Space for all the Big Fossils we Brought

The hall is closed for dinosaurs and fossils.

Dinosaurs and fossils in the school hall.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The morning assembly was cancelled, this allowed us to have more time working with the Foundation Stage children.  The Nursery class went first and they, very enthusiastically, mimicked the survival skills of armoured dinosaurs.  The children “froze like statues” when Tyrannosaurus rex came into their forest.  Prior to the workshop, we had checked with the teaching team so that we could deliver sessions that supported the scheme of work and learning objectives.  We were informed that one pupil loved looking at smooth objects, so we ensured that some polished fossils, including sectioned ammonites were incorporated into the tactile workshops.

The Reception Class has a Cave for a Fossil Display

We are palaeontologists!

We are palaeontologists (display area in school).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The light, airy and tidy Reception classroom had lots of space for dinosaur themed displays.  We especially liked the “cave” in the corner that the dedicated teaching team had created for the budding palaeontologists to practice their phonics and to display their fossil finds.

Dinosaur Themed Extension Activities for Foundation Stage

Having been advised that the Reception class were going to be learning about the famous fossil hunter Mary Anning, we made sure to provide some suitable extension resources featuring this pioneering Georgian woman.  We also challenged the class to draw their very own dinosaur, could they label the body parts including the skull?  This simple exercise is a great way to reinforce learning when it comes to parts of the body and the differences between ourselves and other animals.  A “dinosaur hokey cokey” that we had prepared was also handed over, a chance to help the children with their motor skills and to tie in drama and music/movement activities into the dinosaurs and fossils term topic.

After the conclusion of our morning’s work, the Foundation Stage Two teacher emailed to say:

“Thank you ever so much for the workshop with Reception and Nursery.  The children were highly engaged throughout the sessions and did not stop talking about all the things they learnt throughout the day.  The resources and delivery of the session were brilliant and enabled the children to stay focused and handle lots of interesting objects.  Also, the resources provided for the teachers will be a great way to supplement the topic after the workshop so the children can continue their learning.”

To request more information about Everything Dinosaur’s work in schools: Contact Everything Dinosaur

13 03, 2017

A Purple Woolly Mammoth Inspires Dexter and His Classmates

By | March 13th, 2017|Adobe CS5, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Whirley Primary School Reception Children Study Dinosaurs

Children in the Reception class at Whirley Primary School have been studying dinosaurs and learning about fossils this half term.  Under the expert guidance of their teachers, the children have been looking at different types of dinosaur and working out which ones ate meat and which ones ate plants.  Tyrannosaurus rex is certainly a big favourite amongst the enthusiastic, young palaeontologists and the pupils enjoyed learning lots of new facts about T. rex during a dinosaur themed workshop.  For many schools, this week is “Science Week” and it was great to see the Foundation Stage children joining in and using their big brains (which are twenty times the size of an armoured dinosaur’s brain), to remember where they had been sitting.

Working in the hall, our dinosaur expert was surrounded by wonderful art displays created by the schoolchildren, including some wonderful illustrations of erupting volcanoes by Mr Jackson’s Year 3 class.  Our dinosaur expert felt very much at home surrounded by such colourful drawings.

Year 3 Have Been Study Rocks Including How Igneous Rock is Formed

Volcano drawings by Year 3.

Drawings of volcanoes.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

A Purple Woolly Mammoth

Some of the Reception children found a purple Woolly Mammoth model in their classroom.  The teacher explained that dinosaurs lived a long time ago, millions of years before Woolly Mammoths and people.  Young Dexter was so intrigued to hear about Woolly Mammoths that he was inspired to draw a Woolly Mammoth for himself.

Foundation Stage Children Draw a Woolly Mammoth

A Foundation Stage pupil draws a Mammoth.

A child in Reception class draws a Woolly Mammoth.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Dexter/Everything Dinosaur

That’s a great drawing, Dexter’s teacher was very proud as he had written the words “Woolly Mammoth” and “tusks” on his illustration.  Well done Dexter!

Reception Children Write on their Prehistoric Animal Drawings

Labelling a Woolly Mammoth.

Helping young children become more confident with their writing.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Dexter/Everything Dinosaur

We set the children an extension activity.  In return for some dinosaur stickers, could the children have a go at drawing their very own dinosaur?  Could they label its body parts including the skull?  We hope the picture of a purple coloured Woolly Mammoth helps to inspire the children with their prehistoric animal designs.

A Purple Woolly Mammoth Drawing for the Reception Children at Whirley Primary School

A purple Woolly Mammoth.

A purple coloured Woolly Mammoth for Reception class.

Picture Credit: Whirley Primary School/Dexter/Everything Dinosaur

Can the children label the purple Woolly Mammoth’s body parts?  Can they label the skull?

All to soon the morning had come to an end and it was time to pack up so that the lunchtime supervisors could set up the tables ready for the school dinners.  Not to worry, we provided an assortment of teaching materials and other resources to the enthusiastic teaching team to help them carry on with this stimulating and challenging Foundation Stage term topic.

12 03, 2017

What Do You Know About Dinosaurs?

By | March 12th, 2017|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

What Do You Know About Dinosaurs?  K-W-L Technique

Children at Clutton Church of England Primary School in Cheshire have had a busy week.  The pupils in the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 have been learning all about dinosaurs and life in the past and on Friday, one of our dinosaur experts visited the school to work with the enthusiastic children for a morning.   Before our dinosaur workshop commenced, the Everything Dinosaur team member had the opportunity to examine some of the children’s work including mind maps created by the teacher to help the teaching team develop an appropriate scheme of work for the mixed age group class.

What Do You Know About Dinosaurs?

The KWL technique helps teachers understand subject pre-knowledge.

Using the KWL technique to start a term topic all about dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Clutton C of E Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

What is the K-W-L Technique?

The mind maps formed part of the teacher’s planning for the topic.  She was utilising a technique called the K-W-L.  The K-W-L concept aids teachers and helps them to plan a topic and to check understanding.  It consists of three phases, firstly, the children brainstorm and say what they think they know about dinosaurs and prehistoric animals.  During the brainstorming session, the children will make statements and assertions that provide the teacher with details as to what the children would like to find out about prehistoric animals.  The third phase, which is conducted at the end of the period of teaching, highlights what the children have learned at the end of their studies.  This third phase permits the teaching team to check understanding and gives them the opportunity to reinforce leaning if required.

The Three Phases of the K-W-L Technique

  • What do you know about a subject area?
  • What would you like to learn about a subject?
  • What have we learned about a subject at the end of the topic?

The Second Phase – What Would We Like to Learn About Dinosaurs?

KWL - technique used in schools (dinosaur term topic).

What do you want to know about dinosaurs?

Picture Credit: Clutton C of E Primary School/Everything Dinosaur

Helping to Guide Lesson Planning

When the children in Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 were asked to consider what they already knew about dinosaurs they demonstrated considerable pre-knowledge.  For example, the children knew what the term predator meant and they could explain a little bit about the extinction of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period.

The teaching team were able to gain valuable insights into gaps in the children’s understanding of the wider world when the second mind map was created.  For instance, Olivia wanted to know if dinosaurs killed people, whilst Josh asked how did the dinosaurs eat things?  These two questions could guide the teaching team and provide a stimulus for the scheme of work.  Perhaps, a timeline could be created explaining just how long ago the dinosaurs lived.  The children could look at the teeth of dinosaurs in books and compare these teeth to the teeth of animals alive today and try and work out which dinosaurs were herbivores and which ones were carnivores.

The K-W-L technique provides a useful planning aid for teachers and teaching assistants.

 To see how schematic story maps can help children learn: Schematic Story Maps Help Children to Remember Facts

For information on Everything Dinosaur’s dinosaur workshops in schools: Contact Everything Dinosaur Request Information

6 03, 2017

Abbey Hey Primary Pupils Imagine Prehistoric Animals

By | March 6th, 2017|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Year 1 Design Dinosaurs

Last month, a member of the Everything Dinosaur team visited Abbey Hey Primary Academy to work with the Year 1 classes as they studied dinosaurs and fossils.  During our dinosaur and prehistoric animal themed workshop, we challenged the eager, junior palaeontologists to have a go at designing their very own dinosaur.  The dedicated teachers kindly sent us a set of the children’s drawings and dinosaur designs and what a wonderful display they make.

Year 1 Children at Abbey Hey Primary Academy Design Dinosaurs

Amazing imaginary dinosaur drawings from Year 1,

Year 1 produced some amazing imaginary dinosaur drawings.

Picture Credit: Year 1 (Abbey Hey Primary Academy)

We laid out all the colourful dinosaur designs on the floor of our warehouse.  Once we had carefully sorted them and laid them out we took a photograph (see above).  We can’t wait to pin them all up onto our warehouse notice board.

Thinking of a Name for Your Dinosaur

As part of a series of carefully thought out extension activities, our dinosaur expert challenged the children to label their dinosaur’s body parts.  Once they had done this, could they think of a suitable name for their prehistoric animal?  We received lots of lovely examples, with some super labelling, well done Year 1!  The names the children came up with were very imaginative also, we loved Madison’s purple “Maddisonodon” (see below) for example.

A Very Purple Dinosaur by Madison

A purple dinosaur with a long neck.

A long-necked, purple dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Madison in Year 1 at Abbey Hey Primary Academy

In addition, we had a long-necked dinosaur called “Indiaraptor“, spiky dinosaurs, and a scary looking “Levirex“, what super prehistoric animal names!

Flying reptiles were also included in the extension activity and we received some very colourful pictures of Pterosaurs (flying reptiles), all with lovely labelling.

A Very Carefully Drawn and Labelled Flying Reptile

Children create imaginary prehistoric animals.

A “Tabita-dactyl” – wonderful prehistoric animal drawings from Year 1.

Picture Credit: Year 1 Abbey Hey Primary Academy

The teacher who kindly sent in the pictures included a note:

“We hope you like our lovely imaginary dinosaurs all with unique names”.

We certainly did and the drawings have been put up on display in our warehouse.  Our thanks to all the children in Year 1 and their teachers at Abbey Hey Primary Academy.

 

16 02, 2017

Helping to Organise a School Trip to Wren’s Nest

By | February 16th, 2017|Educational Activities, Geology, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

Wren’s Nest and School Trips

Everything Dinosaur has been contacted by a school based in the West Midlands, seeking advice about a trip to the famous Wren’s Nest National Nature Reserve, a place we know very well indeed!  This location is a popular destination for local schools which are studying fossils and rocks as part of the National Curriculum (England).  Wren’s Nest is to the north-east of the town of Dudley and it is a designated SSSI (site of special scientific interest), so no hammering at the cliffs of this former quarry is allowed. However, lots of fossils are being washed out of the scree slopes and there is something like seven hundred different types of fossil to collect, nearly ninety of which are unique to the Wren’s Nest area.

The Famous Ripple Beds at Wren’s Nest

Ripples preserved in limestone.

The famous ripple beds at Wren’s Nest SSSI located in the West Midlands.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above shows the famous “Ripple Bed Hill” at Wren’s Nest.  This near vertical cliff face was once at the bottom of a shallow sea.  The “ripples” are the preserved remains of wave action on the seabed, they are around 426 million years old.  Taking schoolchildren to this location, helps them to gain an appreciation of deep, geological time.

How Did the Ripple Beds Form?

These structures formed as a result of massive, probably seasonal storms that swept across the normally, relatively calm sea.  The huge waves generated by the storm, led to the seabed being disturbed, the waves created by the storm had much more energy and their effect was felt much deeper in the tropical sea than usual.  Sand and debris was picked up and washed backwards and forwards over the seabed, creating the ripples.  The seabed was nearly 100 feet (thirty metres), under water and normally it would have been unaffected by usual sea conditions.  However, the symmetrical ripples are evidence of storm damage to this part of the seabed back in the Late Silurian.

After the storm had passed, the sea would have once again returned to its relatively calm state.  Thirty metres down the seabed was once again protected by the effects of normal-sized waves, which could not penetrate deep enough to wipe away the ridges and ripples caused by the storm.  Crinoids, (sea-lilies) soon colonised this part of the sea floor. However, sometime later, perhaps a few months, or perhaps after several years a large amount of mud was dumped on top of the ripples, permitting their preservation.  The mud could have been deposited as a result of exceptional run-off from the land, or perhaps an earthquake or other seismic event led to a large amount of sediment being shifted.  Whatever, the cause the ripples (and the crinoids living on them), were buried.  Palaeontologists have identified a total of twenty-five ripple bed areas in the cliffs that make up this feature of Wren’s Nest.  Each ripple bed represents a separate storm event.

Fossils Galore to be Found

More than 700 different fossils found at Wren's Nest

Lots of brachiopod and coral fossils to find at Wren’s Nest.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Top Tips for a School Visit to Wren’s Nest

The site represents the remains of an ancient coral ecosystem dating between 423-426 million years ago (mya), it is Silurian in age and more than 700 different types of fossils have been found at this site.  A party of schoolchildren will not collect them all, but they are bound to find plenty of fossils to satisfy curious minds.  However, finding your own Trilobite fossil, a “Dudley Bug” Calymene blumenbachii, is most unlikely but you might find a fragment of the exoskeleton, a piece shed when the animal moulted.

• This is an SSSI (site of special scientific interest), no hammers or tools of any kind are permitted on site. However, you don’t need any tools as the constantly eroding scree provides lots of fossils that can simply be picked up.
• There are no toilet facilities at this location
• A mid-week visit is best, either quite early in the morning or in the afternoon, although, the area tends not to be that busy at most times
• When we visit we park close to the Caves Inn (car parking from 9.30am to 4pm Monday to Friday)
• The slopes are a magnet for young fossil hunters who love to try to climb them (and run up and down them), these slopes are very steep and very slippery after rain, so sensible precautions need to be taken.
• There is a slight risk of rock falls, after all, this is an old quarry site, but in all our visits, we have never seen any evidence of this.
• Contact Wren’s Nest here: Further information about Wren’s Nest. You might even be able to arrange short talk by one of the very knowledgeable wardens.

Typical Scree Slope at Wren’s Nest

Wren's Nest SSSI

A view of Wren’s Nest.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

9 02, 2017

Foundation Children and Year 2 Study Dinosaurs

By | February 9th, 2017|Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|0 Comments

January – A Month of Studying Dinosaurs

Children in the Foundation Stage and Year 2 at Our Lady & St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School, (Rotherham, South Yorkshire), spent last month learning all about dinosaurs and fossils.  The dedicated and enthusiastic teaching staff had put together an exciting and challenging scheme of work and as part of a planned range of experiences, Everything Dinosaur was invited into the school to deliver dinosaur and fossil themed workshops for the children.  The visitor from Everything Dinosaur had already liaised with the teaching staff to ensure that the Foundation Stage 1 children (Nursery), could be involved.  The Foundation Stage 1 children are split between a morning session and an afternoon session.  To allow all the Nursery and Reception children to participate, it was simply a case of dividing the Reception class into two.  This meant that some Reception children could have a workshop with the morning Nursery children, whilst the remainder of the class could have a workshop after lunch joining the afternoon Nursery class.  The dinosaur expert coordinated his lesson plans with the school so that each group had a similar kinaesthetic and visual learning experience.  This would help the Reception class team, when the children were brought together again, to review the many photographs of the workshop as part of a recall/recounting activity.

Lots of Amazing Dinosaur Designs

Drawings of dinosaurs.

Dinosaur drawings.

Picture Credit: Our Lady & St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School and Everything Dinosaur

Design Your Own Dinosaur!

Several extension ideas came out of the dinosaur workshops.  For example, we challenged the children to have a go at designing their own dinosaur.  We wanted to see if the children could label the body parts of their prehistoric animal creation, especially the skull.  We carefully arranged the drawings from the classes, (the teacher had kindly sent in the drawings to us), on our warehouse floor, these were photographed before they were pinned onto our various display boards.

Imaginative Dinosaur Designs

Dinosaur drawings.

Wonderful dinosaur drawings.

Picture Credit: Our Lady & St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School and Everything Dinosaur

We asked the Year 2 children to consider what colour the dinosaur might be?  Where would it have lived?  How would it have kept itself safe in the Age of Dinosaurs?  This activity for the Reception children helps them with their fine motor skills as well as reinforcing ideas about our own bodies and how they differ from animals.

Under the guidance of the teaching team, many of the children embellished their designs using different materials like sparkles, coloured circles, buttons and feathers.  Feathers are quite appropriate as palaeontologists are confident that a large number of dinosaurs were indeed, covered in a coat of shaggy feathers.

Lots of Dinosaurs were Feathered

A feathered ornithomimid dinosaur.

Mums and Dads with wings in the Ornithomimidae

Picture Credit: Press Association (illustration by Julius Csotonyi)

A Jessosaurus One of the Dinosaur Designs

A dinosaur design.

Jessosaurus – dinosaur design.

Picture Credit: Our Lady & St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School and Everything Dinosaur

A Long-Legged Dinosaur with Big Eyes

A very long-legged dinosaur.

A long-legged dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Our Lady & St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School and Everything Dinosaur

For further information about Everything Dinosaur’s teaching work in schools and dinosaur workshops: Contact Everything Dinosaur

Our thanks to the teaching team at Our Lady & St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School for sending into Everything Dinosaur such a super selection of dinosaur drawings.

8 02, 2017

“Les Dinosaures” Drawing Materials from Papo

By | February 8th, 2017|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Press Releases, Teaching|0 Comments

“Les Dinosaures” Drawing Materials from Papo

Papo the France-based model and figure manufacturer have donated a pdf featuring prehistoric animals so that Everything Dinosaur can offer this as a free to download Key Stage 1 and EYFS teaching resource for schools.  Children enjoy colouring pictures of dinosaurs and other amazing creatures that lived in the past, the Papo colouring in materials features the horned dinosaur Styracosaurus (Late Cretaceous) and a Sabre-Tooth Cat, a Smilodon (Pleistocene Epoch).

The Prehistoric Animal Drawing to Colour In

Prehistoric animal scene to colour in from Papo of France.

Prehistoric animal drawing materials donated by Papo.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur and Papo

Everything Dinosaur offers a wide range of free to download teaching resources as part of its extensive work in schools, helping to teach about life in the past.

A spokesperson for Everything Dinosaur commented:

“Our thanks to Papo for sending across the image, it will be available as a free to download pdf file from our specialist dinosaurs for schools website.  We now offer over thirty free downloads of teaching resources for schools, aimed at Foundation Stage through to Key Stage 4.”

To see the Everything Dinosaur specialist schools site and to gain access to the free to download teaching materials and other resources: Everything Dinosaur School Website

Word Mats, Lesson Plans and How to Demonstrate Birds are Dinosaurs

A number of Papo prehistoric animal models are used in our dinosaur themed workshops with children.  For example, when discussing evolution and natural selection with Year six pupils we use models of the various Velociraptors made by Papo to demonstrate how our ideas about dinosaurs have changed over time.  The Papo feathered Velociraptor is ideal for demonstrating how closely related to birds some Theropod dinosaurs were.

The Papo Velociraptor Dinosaur Model Makes a Useful Teaching Aid

The Papo feathered Velociraptor dinosaur model.

Available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Papo feathered Velociraptor dinosaur model makes a wonderful, tactile teaching aid when demonstrating how closely related the Aves (birds), are to some kinds of dinosaur.  This element from our dinosaur workshop provides lots of extension ideas and activities.  The class become avid bird watchers, or should that be “avian dinosaur watchers”.

When working with younger children we challenge them to develop their vocabulary using pictures of Papo prehistoric animal models.  We have made a series of word mats, that once laminated can help children gain confidence with new words and can help them learn the differences between people and animals.  The accompanying pronunciation guide and geological time line proves very useful to the teachers too.

Papo Model Inspired Word Mats Produced by Everything Dinosaur

Word mat featuring Spinosaurus.

Papo Spinosaurus word mat.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of Papo prehistoric animal models available from Everything Dinosaur: Papo Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models

7 02, 2017

Everything Dinosaur Customer Reviews

By | February 7th, 2017|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Press Releases, Teaching|0 Comments

Everything Dinosaur Customer Reviews

As Everything Dinosaur prepares to introduce a new website, time today to reflect on all the wonderful reviews the company has received from its customers.  Over 1,500 comments, reviews and feedback from customers have been posted up on Everything Dinosaur’s website, we are grateful for them all.  The “dinosaurs for schools” website has a different review format.  This website in the Everything Dinosaur portfolio is dedicated to helping teachers, teaching assistants and educationalists and provides lots of helpful prehistoric animal themed resources for schools.  There are more than thirty free downloads available, all aimed at supporting the curriculum, this website has reviews of our dinosaur themed workshops posted up.  Over 170 schools have provided feedback and we are very proud of our five-star rating.

Recent Reviews on the Everything Dinosaur Website:

  • Sculptor Doug Watson has thoroughly consulted modern scientific literature on the “Tyrant King” to create this defining model.  Whilst the reality of soft tissue extent and integumentary coverage in Tyrannosaurus rex is long lost in the depths of time, this model is anatomically precise, and is a very feasible reconstruction based on the forensic modern approach to dinosaur research.  There is nothing “fluffy” or soft about this reconstruction.  It is perfectly realised as THE alpha predator stem bird!  Exceptional.  No collector should be without one! [Wild Safari Prehistoric World Feathered T. rex model].
  • An awesome model.  Absolutely quality, fantastic model; great size and beautiful detail!  [CollectA Kelenken Terror Bird replica].
  • Nice to deal with a company that cares about its customers.  I would just like to thank you, received my order today it is a lovely set, my grandson will love it, nice to deal with a company who cares about their customers from the start of ordering to end with delivery.  Keep up the good work.  Thank you. [Dinosaur Dinner Set]
  • It seems I was lucky in nabbing the last one from ED so I will just say, if you like the look of this replica, it’s well worth the effort hunting one down.  As usual ED are extremely helpful and super-fast dispatching their orders.  Thank you. [Rebor 1:1 scale Lourinhanosaurus replica – limited edition].

The Wild Safari Prehistoric World Feathered T. rex Model Has Attracted a Lot of Favourable Reviews

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Feathered Tyrannosaurus rex.

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Feathered T. rex.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Recent Reviews on the Everything Dinosaur “dinosaurs for school” Website:

  • The whole morning session was excellent.  Children (and staff) were engaged and enthralled by the information, fossils and activities.  Support and follow-up ideas are excellent and have really helped to shape my topic from this point.  Overall a fantastic experience and learning session for all involved.  Brilliant workshop!  [Dinosaur Workshop KS1]
  • The children had an amazing experience today.  The detail of the lesson plan and discussion beforehand meant that lots of knowledge was reinforced and gained.  Dino Mike had the whole class mesmerised for the duration of the session.  The resources were great.  [Year 1]
  • Another wonderful session.  All children involved very active and interactive, ideal for the age of the children.  Mike’s energy and personality are so well suited to these sessions.  I know Mike has visited at least seven times before over the years and I guarantee that we will book again.  [Reception]

Everything Dinosaur’s Workshops in Schools Help to Popularise Science in Schools

Getting involved in science.

Get up close to science with a hands-on public day at Daresbury SciTech.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We look forward to having even more reviews and customer comments on our new website.

26 01, 2017

Gigantosaurus – You Mean Giganotosaurus?

By | January 26th, 2017|Dinosaur Fans, Educational Activities, Main Page, Teaching|2 Comments

No Such Dinosaur As Gigantosaurus

This week, team members at Everything Dinosaur are in the middle of their dinosaur themed workshops planned for the first half of the Spring Term.  About fifteen workshops have been undertaken since Christmas and there are another fifteen or so to go before the half-term break.  On Friday, a member of the Everything Dinosaur teaching team will be visiting a school to work with two classes of Year 2 children who have been learning about dinosaurs.  The inspirational text is “Gigantosaurus” written by Jonny Duddle.  The class teacher has been using this fictional text to inspire English work by using imaginative descriptions to create characters and setting descriptions.  In addition, the Lower Key Stage children will be exploring rhyme through poetry.

However, there has not been a dinosaur named “Gigantosaurus”.

Children Being Inspired by a Dinosaur Book

Gigantosaurus.

No such dinosaur called “Gigantosaurus”.

 

Carefully Crafted Scheme of Work

The choice of dinosaur themed text is part of a carefully crafted scheme of work that explores a range of fiction and non-fiction texts over the course of the term topic.  Non-fiction texts are being used to help challenge the children to write non-chronological reports.  For those readers unfamiliar with the book “Gigantosaurus”, it is a simple tale based on the story of the boy who cried wolf.  All young dinosaurs are warned about the scary “Gigantosaurus”.   Young Bonehead volunteers to be the lookout whenever the group of dinosaur friends go into the jungle to play.  He alerts his friends on numerous occasions but “Gigantosaurus” is nowhere to be seen, this is the story of the “boy who cried wolf”.  Bonehead’s friends refuse to believe his warnings when the dinosaur called “Gigantosaurus” finally turns up.

Giganotosaurus carolinii or Gigantspinosaurus sichuanensis

Inspirational this fiction text might be, but most young palaeontologists will tell you that the closest real dinosaur name is Giganotosaurus (giant southern lizard), a meat-eating dinosaur and one of the largest terrestrial carnivores known to science.

A Model of the Giant Meat-eating Dinosaur Giganotosaurus (G. carolinii)

Giganotosaurus dinosaur model.

Wild Safari Prehistoric World Giganotosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Ironically, Giganotosaurus (pronounced jy-ga-no-toe-sore-us), is a favourite amongst children, especially boys.  Being bigger than Tyrannosaurus rex makes Giganotosaurus carolinii very popular indeed.  It is not the only dinosaur with a similar sounding name. There is Stegosaur from China known as Gigantspinosaurus (G. sichuanensis).  The genus name means “giant spined lizard” and one glance at the illustration of this plant-eating dinosaur (below) will tell you why.

An Illustration of Gigantspinosaurus (G. sichuanensis)

A drawing of Gigantspinosaurus.

The very “spiky” Gigantspinosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

As part of a series of extension activities planned for the children after our dinosaur workshop in the school, we have prepared a dinosaur “hokey cokey” song for the children, it will help them explore rhyme through a familiar song.  We will also be telling them all about Giganotosaurus.

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