Category: Press Releases

Wonderful Dinosaur Illustrations from India

Young Fans Send in their Dinosaur Drawings to Everything Dinosaur

It is always a pleasure to receive drawings of prehistoric animals from fans of dinosaurs.  We get lots and lots sent into our offices from all over the world.  We are always pleased to receive these illustrations and it amazes us how diverse the drawings are.  Dinosaurs dominate, but we get pictures of Ichthyosaurs, Pterosaurs as well as artwork depicting scenes from the Palaeozoic as well as the Mesozoic.  In addition, our post bags and emails also contain drawings of prehistoric mammals, Woolly Mammoths and Sabre-Toothed Cats being particularly popular.

Here are some examples sent in to Everything Dinosaur from India.

A Drawing of the Fearsome Carnivore Giganotosaurus

A colourful dinosaur drawing from India.

A colourful dinosaur drawing from India.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

The illustrator has correctly stated that the name Giganotosaurus means “giant southern lizard”.  We have printed out this artwork and pinned it onto one of our warehouse walls, so that everyone in the company can see when they are in the warehouse looking for dinosaur toys and games.

A Rearing Sauropod Defends Itself from Attack

A rearing Sauropod.

A rearing Sauropod.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

Another interesting drawing, one depicting a fight between two dinosaurs.  The green, long-necked dinosaur reminds us of the “Rearing Diplodocus” model in the Collecta not-to-scale model range.

The Collecta Rearing Diplodocus Dinosaur Model

Model was introduced in 2013.

Model was introduced in 2013.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We really enjoy viewing all the wonderful prehistoric animal drawings that get sent into our offices, the one below shows an illustration of the huge, fish-eating dinosaur known as Spinosaurus, (thanks for this Shivesh).

A Drawing of the Mighty Spinosaurus

A fantastic drawing Shivesh!

A fantastic drawing Shivesh!

Picture Credit: Shivesh

When it comes to the dinosaurs, we tend to get a lot of pictures showing carnivorous dinosaurs, including the likes of Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex.  We have posted up a wonderful drawing of a meat-eating dinosaur, this time coloured predominately sky blue.

Dinosaur Drawings in November (Dinovember)

Fearsome Theropod dinosaur.

Fearsome Theropod dinosaur.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

The dinosaur in the picture above seems to be on the prowl, perhaps it is stalking potential prey.  We at Everything Dinosaur really enjoy seeing all these wonderful prehistoric animal illustrations.  Our thanks to all the budding, young (and not so young), palaeoartists that take the time and trouble to send them into us.

Thanks.

Facebook and Facebook “Likes”

Getting “Likes” on Facebook

Since Everything Dinosaur joined Facebook in the last few days of September 2010, we have slowly and surely built up our Facebook fans and “likes”.  Today, we have 1,429 likes and we feel that every single one of them has been earned.  We try very hard to give our customers and fans the very best customer service that we can.  We are passionate about palaeontology and we really care about the products and services that we offer.  We have noticed recently that a couple of Facebook pages that we ourselves have been following have suddenly seen their number of “likes” shoot up, not by a few dozen over the course of several days, but by tens of thousands in one case.  We suspect that these “likes” are not entirely genuine, that they have been purchased from a “like farm” or some such other company.

Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook Header

Everything Dinosaur on Facebook.

Everything Dinosaur on Facebook.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Whilst reviewing the spam comments picked up on our schools website, we noticed the following comment, clearly an advertisement from one such “like farm” or a company selling similar services.  We have not included the web address of the firm concerned but this is what the comment said:

“Here is the scenario, you tell people to visit your Facebook page and when they get there they see something like ten likes.  This is tantamount to walking in to an empty restaurant at lunch hour!  Kind of makes you nervous doesn’t it?  This does not have to be the case.  Now you can buy 100 percent safe and REAL likes and followers for facebook, instagram, twitter and youtube.  These are not fake bot-generated likes.  They are from real and active users.  This means you will not only boost your appearance but you will also benefit from engagement and potential sales not to mention that a more active social profile will also rank you better with Google.  It is a win-win situation.  Check out xxxxx for more details – I know you will be glad you did!”

Facebook “likes” Should be Earned not Purchased

At Everything Dinosaur, we believe that “likes” or any other endorsements have to be earned.  There are no short-cuts to building a genuine two-way relationship with customers and we think most customers can see through such dubious marketing activities.  It is highly unlikely that the Facebook page visited just a couple of days ago has suddenly generated thousands of Facebook “likes” with hundreds of people talking about them, rather than the few dozen or so earlier in the week.

We believe customer service is the key to getting "likes".

We believe customer service is the key to getting “likes”.

We have asked a couple of customers who we have been in touch with today to give us a “like” on our Facebook page if they liked our customer service.  One of these was the lady who telephoned us to say her parcel had not arrived, within a few minutes, we had checked on when the order had been despatched and emailed her with some useful information to help find the missing dinosaurs.  As the order had been sent to a company, we suggested that the intended recipient should check with the reception desk/mail room to see if the parcel had been put somewhere.  Sure enough, an enquiry at the mail room led to the safe recovery of the dinosaurs.

This customer emailed us to confirm that everything was fine and dandy.  The customer said:

“Just to let you know that the parcel was indeed at the office, the post room managed to lose it but it has now been found so no small dinosaurs are AWOL in central London :-)  Thank you very much for your assistance, I have been very impressed with the customer service.”

Feel free to visit Everything Dinosaur on Facebook: Our Facebook Page have a look round, add a comment or two if you wish and if you think we are worth it, please give our Facebook page a “like”.

The second person we asked to give a “like” to the Everything Dinosaur Facebook page today, was the lady who telephoned before placing an order to check when she might receive a dinosaur themed dressing up costume, should she place an order with us this morning.  She needed the costume for Tuesday and did not want to order the item, if there was no way that it could get to her.  The team member who took her call was able to reassure her, to ensure that her order was prioritised and to personally check that the order was despatched in the afternoon, as promised.  That person was then also able to swap the dressing up costume for a larger size when the customer telephoned again to say that she might have ordered the wrong size by mistake.

These sort of things are what we do, our customer service helps explain how, slowly and surely, the team here have managed to build up 1,429 genuine “likes” our on Facebook page.  We really do appreciate all the likes, comments, feedback and reviews that we receive and we would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone for giving Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page a “like” – all 1,429 of you.

Oops, our mistake 1,430 likes.

Recommended Christmas Reading for Dinosaur Fans

“Dinosaurs of the British Isles” – An Ideal Christmas Gift

Not sure what to buy a budding palaeontologist for Christmas, well, Everything Dinosaur recommends “Dinosaurs of the British Isles” by Dean Lomax and Nobumichi Tamura (Siri Scientific Press).  This book provides a comprehensive guide to the dinosaur discoveries that have been made in the United Kingdom and it takes the reader from the Triassic through to the Late Cretaceous, cataloguing all the various dinosaurs in geochronological order.

The Front Cover of Dinosaurs of the British Isles

A comprehensive guide to British dinosaurs over 400 pages.

A comprehensive guide to British dinosaurs over 400 pages.

Picture Credit: Siri Scientific Press

Dean and Nobumichi have painstakingly compiled a comprehensive review of all the major dinosaur fossil finds and this book is aimed at the general reader as well as at fossil collectors and dinosaur fans.  Southern England and the Isle of Wight may be globally significant locations when it comes to Early Cretaceous dinosaurs, but readers may be surprised to find that the sandstones in Morayshire (Scotland) have provided tantalising clues to life on the super-continent Pangaea during the Triassic and the oldest dinosaur tracks can be spotted at Barry in the Vale of Glamorgan (south Wales).

The authors are to be commended, as they provide a fascinating introduction to the Dinosauria, their classification and the emergence of palaeontology as a science.  This all follows a well-written foreword by Dr. Paul Barrett, a highly respected academic and vertebrate palaeontologist at the Natural History Museum (London).  With the Dinosauria well and truly introduced, it is time to meet some of the amazing prehistoric creatures that once roamed the British Isles.  For example, at least three types of tyrannosaurid may once have roamed across this part of the world.  There’s the Proceratosaurus (P. bradleyi) whose fossilised remains, come from Gloucestershire, the fearsome, five-metre long Juratyrant, a terror of the Late Jurassic whose fossilised remains have been discovered near Swanage (Dorset) and Eotyrannus (E. lengi), represented by a partial skeleton found on the Isle of Wight.

 Documenting the Theropoda of the British Isles

A potential Compsognathidae?

A potential Compsognathidae?

Picture Credit: Siri Scientific Press

 It is not just the meat-eaters that palaeontologist Dean Lomax has documented in collaboration with California based, palaeoartist Nobumichi Tamura.  The United Kingdom boasts some very impressive (and gigantic) herbivorous dinosaurs too. This book also provides a comprehensive account of the huge Sauropods that once stomped across the British Isles, many of which rivalled the long-necked dinosaurs of North America in terms of size.

To visit the website of Siri Scientific Press to learn more about “Dinosaurs of the British Isles”: Siri Scientific Press

Author Dean Provides a Scale for Cetiosaurus

A belly up view of "Whale Lizard".

A belly up view of “Whale Lizard”.

Picture Credit: Dean Lomax

The full colour photographs are very informative and support the text extremely effectively.  This is a rare example of a book that will appeal to serious academics as well as to the general reader.  ”Dinosaurs of the British Isles” provides a fascinating introduction to the Dinosauria, before moving on to describe every dinosaur species represented by the known fossil record from this part of the world in great detail.

Highly recommended.

“Dinosaurs of the British Isles” by Dean Lomax and Nobumichi Tamura is available from Siri Scientific Press (Siri Scientific Press), length 414 pages, ISBN: 978-0-9574530-5-0.

To Clone or Not to Clone a Woolly Mammoth

Documentaries on Woolly Mammoth Autopsy and Cloning Possibilities

Two documentaries focusing on the study of a remarkably well preserved female Woolly Mammoth carcase are due to be shown in the UK and the United States towards the end of this month.  Channel 4 (UK) will show “Woolly Mammoth: The Autopsy” on Sunday, November 23rd at 8pm.  Stateside viewers will be able to see a similar documentary entitled “How to Clone a Woolly Mammoth”, it will air on the Smithsonian Channel on November 29th.

The 40,000-year-old star of the show, is “Buttercup” a mature female Woolly Mammoth.  The frozen carcase was discovered back in 2013, when a research team from the Research Institute of Applied Ecology, the Russian Geographical Society and the North Eastern Federal University was exploring the remote Lyakhovsky islands, part of the Novosibirsk archipelago, situated in the Eastern Siberia Sea in the search for Woolly Mammoth fossil remains.  The scientists found that entombed within the ice, much of the front part of this Mammoth’s body was intact.  This was one of the best preserved specimens ever discovered and the television programme makers examine what these remains can tell us about these long extinct creatures and then the programmes discuss the prospect of scientists producing a clone.

When the body cavity of the Mammoth was examined, in places where it had begun to slightly thaw, a thick, red liquid could be encouraged to flow out of the flesh.  At the time this was described as “blood”. Although it may have contained constituents of blood, the television documentaries will explain in more detail what this was.  However, one thing that the field team could be confident about, this one of the best preserved Woolly Mammoths ever found.  Having a strong stomach is needed for this sort or work.  A nose peg/face mask is recommended, once the body starts to warm up, decomposition and putrefaction are not far away.

Returning a Woolly Mammoth, a species that has not been seen on this Earth for thousands of years, back from the dead.  This might sound like the stuff of science fiction, but the cloning of a Woolly Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), is a distinct possibility although probably not for at least another thirty or forty years – just a blink in geological time.

To read about the discovery of the Mammoth that is now called “Buttercup”: A Woolly Mammoth with Fresh Blood?

Should the Woolly Mammoth be Resurrected?

Will the Woolly Mammoth return?

Will the Woolly Mammoth return?

Picture Credit:  Everything Dinosaur

 It is likely that this elephant became mired in a bog and she probably succumbed to exhaustion, although an attack from predators is not ruled out as much of the rear portion of the skeleton has been lost and that which remains shows feeding damage.   Whether this was post-mortem, we at Everything Dinosaur are unable to say.

Whilst we at Everything Dinosaur are very much in favour of the study of these Siberian giants.  After all, actually examining the slowly thawing out flesh of such a creature provides science with so much more information than just the bones. We remain concerned about the moral and ethical issues involved in any cloning process.  True, scientists from Harvard University and from South Korea’s Sooam Biotech Research Foundation are trying to just that, to bring a Woolly Mammoth back by cloning, although both teams are going about it in slightly different ways.

We feel that certain questions have to be asked, for example, what contribution to overall genetic research would such a project make?  Indeed, is it right to focus on trying to resurrect the Mammoth when more resources could be directed at trying to save critically endangered flora and fauna that are still around.

We imagine a scenario, whereby, many Indian elephant females are subjected to experimentation and if a clone could be created, then there is the problem of surviving the lengthy gestation if a successful implanting into the womb of a surrogate mother could be achieved.

If the baby could survive to term, then there is the birth itself, or most likely a Caesarean section, as no commercial company would want to lose their “genetic investment” at this late stage.  If the baby survives, boy or girl (gender will probably be determined for it), then it could end up being rejected by what would already be a traumatised mother.  If the calf lives, we suspect there may be a number of unforeseen medical issues (as has been the case in the cloning a number of extant animals), then what sort of life would this young Woolly Mammoth have.

Could we See a Baby Woolly Mammoth in a Zoo in 2050?

Baby Woolly Mammoth - the New Lyuba?

Baby Woolly Mammoth – the New Lyuba?

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Possibly rejected by its own mother and never able to be part of a herd, this elephant, highly social by instinct, part of a species that had a childhood almost as long as a human’s childhood, would be totally isolated and alone.  It would have no references, no role models, no benchmark.  It would be a Woolly Mammoth or something resembling a Mammoth (depending on the proportion of Indian elephant DNA involved), but it would not know how to behave or act like a Mammoth.

We at Everything Dinosaur foresee a heart-breaking scene in a zoo, perhaps in the not too distant future, whereby, a shaggy, rough coated elephant is paraded in front of crowds of visitors to the great satisfaction and economic benefit to the institution that owns this genetic wonder.  For the animal itself, it would most probably be doomed to live an entirely unnatural existence with none of the social interactions that these elephants would crave.  Just as we have captured Orcas and displayed them at theme parks and we are now only being to understand the trauma we put these magnificent creatures through.

Being able to explore the flesh and blood of a long dead creature is of great importance to science.  We accept that one day in future the cloning of a Mammoth may indeed be possible.  But just because we can do something doesn’t make it right to do.  To clone a Mammoth would involve a tremendously dedicated team of scientists who would be pushing at the boundaries of our understanding of genetics, but just as with the study of the carcase itself, when it comes to the moral and ethical implications, a strong stomach will be required.

Let’s hope that the documentaries examine the ethical dimensions of cloning such as a creature as well as providing more information on how these ancient creatures lived and died.

New from Collecta for 2015

Temnodontosaurus and Moropus Models

The last two Collecta models to go into production for 2015 are the remarkable Ichthyosaur replica depicting a Temnodontosaurus giving birth and the Chalicothere replica – Moropus).  These will be available in the late Spring of 2015, we suspect around May/June.

The Ichthyosaur replica (Temnodontosaurus platyodon), is we believe, a world first for a mainstream model manufacturer.  The replica depicts a female at the moment of giving birth.  Viviparity in the Ichthyosauria was just one of their adaptations to a fully marine existence.

New for 2015 The Collecta Temnodontosaurus Ichthyosaur Model

Detailed Ichthyosaur figure.

Detailed Ichthyosaur figure.

Picture Credit: Collecta

 This model measures around twenty centimetres long from the tip of the snout to the tail flukes.  The baby is being born tail first and it is not detachable from the mother. There have been some remarkable fossils found which show Ichthyosaurs preserved in the process of giving birth, we are not aware of any such specimens which feature T. platyodon, but it is fitting that Collecta should choose to produce their first Ichthyosaur based on Temnodontosaurus, as this was the first Ichthyosaur fossil to be described, when a specimen showing a nearly complete skull and articulated cervical vertebrae was discovered in Dorset back in 1810.

An Ichthyosaur Fossil Showing Viviparity (Live Birth)

Viviparity in Ichthyosaurs

Viviparity in Ichthyosaurs

Picture Credit: Natural History Museum

 In the picture above, a baby can be clearly seen emerging tail first from the mother.  Being born tail first prevented the youngster from drowning before it had time to free itself from its mother.  A number of Temnodontosaurus species have been described, at around twelve metres in length, T. platyodon was one of the largest of all the Ichthyosaurs known to science.  It would have been an predator (but not likely an apex predator) in the Early Jurassic seas of Europe. Everything Dinosaur team members thing that this marine reptile specialised in hunting Cephalopods.   Based on a length of twelve metres we estimate that this figure would be in 1:60 scale.

The mainly black pigmentation of the model is based on recently published research (Lund University, Sweden) that suggested that most Ichthyosaurs were dark coloured, although the conclusions made by the Swedish researchers have been challenged.

To read about the research into marine reptile skin colour: Marine Reptiles Dressed in “Little Black Numbers.

To view the article that challenges the colouration proposed for marine reptiles: Working out the Colour of Long Extinct Animals Just Got Harder.

Now let’s turn our attention to the Chalicothere model that Collecta will also be bringing out in the summer of 2015 (July 2015).  This is a model of the North American “knuckle-walker”, known as Moropus.

Collecta Deluxe Moropus Model Available in Summer 2015

Wonderful prehistoric animal model.

Wonderful prehistoric animal model.

Picture Credit: Collecta

Intriguingly, this replica has attracted a lot of attention, after all, there are not that many top quality prehistoric mammal replicas to be found and this model of a Miocene  herbivore is superb.  Everything Dinosaur intends to produce a fact sheet on this model, we intend to focus on Moropus elatus (named by Marsh).

There may also be confusion over to the scale of the Deluxe Moropus figure, some paperwork from Collecta states 1:12 scale, whilst other notes refer to the Moropus being a 1:20 scale model.  The Moropus figure measures a fraction under fourteen centimetres long from the snout to the tip of the tail and it stands a little over sixteen centimetres high (top of the head). Based on M. elatus with a shoulder height of around 2.4 metres we estimate that this figure is nearer to 1:20 scale than 1:12, although this calculation does depend on which species  and which fossil specimens are used as references.

To view Everything Dinosaur’s existing stock of Collect Deluxe: Collecta Scale Prehistoric Animals

Either way it is a super, new addition to the Collecta range and we look forward to adding both these replicas to our inventory.

Kind Words from an Everything Dinosaur Customer

Praising Everything Dinosaur

We all work very hard to help our customers at Everything Dinosaur.  Whether it is packing a last minute order that is needed urgently for a birthday gift, or helping to advise a school on a fossil themed lesson plan, or even providing prehistoric animal models for a scientist, these are all typical activities covered in the last two hours or so.  We have thousands and thousands of customers all over the world, we are grateful for all the support that our little team receives.  Many of our delighted customers take the trouble to telephone us or email to say how good our customer service is (they also really appreciate our products and our prices).

Thought we would post up today an email sent into us this morning by Paula, a mum who was very pleased with her parcel and was delighted with the way we looked after her.

Paula wrote:

“I received my order and I am absolutely delighted with it, thank you!  I thought I must write and congratulate you on your outstanding service.  The email below that you sent to me when I placed the order was so refreshing.  I knew that my order had been received and that there was a real person I could contact if I needed help.  Also the information sheets you sent were fantastic.  My son is going to love them.”

It is always a pleasure to hear from our customers, glad we were able to help.
Paula concluded her email by stating:

“Keep up the excellent work. You definitely have the right approach to doing business! I wish you all the very best.”

Even our boss “Tyrannosaurus Sue” was pleased.  When it comes to dinosaur models and toys, people know where to visit: Everything Dinosaur.

 

New Collecta Models (Part 2)

New Releases from Collecta for 2015 and Model Measurements

Those clever people at Collecta have released the second batch of new additions to their “Prehistoric Life” model series.  These are all models that will be stocked by Everything Dinosaur in 2016.  In this short article, we provide pictures of the new models and update readers on the dimensions of all the 2015 releases to date.

So let’s jump straight in..

Collecta Smilodon Replica (May 2015)

Nicely crafted Sabre-Tooth Cat model.

Nicely crafted Sabre-Tooth Cat model.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This is a very well designed model of a Sabre-Tooth Cat.  The replica measures a little under 13cm in length and the head stands around 8cm high.  The model is in the not-to-scale range and Everything Dinosaur believes it is a replacement for the earlier Smilodon model introduced a few years ago.  This earlier Smilodon is likely to become a rare model so Everything Dinosaur urges collectors to acquire this replica before it is officially retired.

To view the existing Collecta Smilodon model: Ice Age Toys and Models

Let’s retain the prehistoric mammal model theme and discuss the entelodont replica, the 1:20 scale model of Daeodon.  This model will also be available from Everything Dinosaur in the late spring of 2015.

1:20 Scale Deluxe Daeodon Entelodont Model from Collecta

Soon to be available from Everything Dinosaur.

Soon to be available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This beautifully painted model of a “war pig” as we like to call it measures a fraction under 16cm in length and the height of the hump is 9.5cm off the ground.

Sticking with the Deluxe range, another new addition, in what will be termed the Supreme Deluxe range and available from Everything Dinosaur in the late spring of 2015 is this excellent model of the Pterosaur called Guidraco.  This is in approximate 1:4 scale and the model measures 25cm long and it stands approximately 25cm high.  This replica will have an articulated lower jaw. The colour scheme has been based on an Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica), one of our favourite sea birds.  Guidraco (fossils from the famous Lioaning Province of China), like the Puffin, was believed to be a fish-eater.

The Wonderful Model of the Guidraco Pterosaur

Available from Everything Dinosaur in late spring 2015.

Available from Everything Dinosaur in late spring 2015.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

Super colours on this Pterosaur replica.  The model will also feature an articulated lower jaw.

Another addition to the Deluxe range is this replica of the Theropod dinosaur Acrocanthosaurus.

Collecta Deluxe Acrocanthosaurus Dinosaur Model

A 1:40 scale model from Collecta.

A 1:40 scale model from Collecta.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This model measures a fraction under 30cm in length and the head height is around 12cm.  It is slightly smaller than the Deluxe Feathered T.rex from Collecta that is also due out next year (see below).

The Deluxe 1:40 Scale Feathered Tyrannosaurus rex

1:40 scale model of a feathered T. rex.

1:40 scale model of a feathered T. rex.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

The model looks fantastic, the colouration is based on the juvenile feathered T. rex replica that came out this year.

The Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex Model (2014)

A young T. rex

A young T. rex

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the Collecta range stocked by Everything Dinosaur: Collecta Models – Prehistoric Life Series

Last week, Everything Dinosaur team members posted up images and further information on the first of the 2015 model releases from Collecta.  To view this article: First Pictures of New Collecta Model Releases

Here are the measurements of the models we featured:

  • Xiongguanlong – this Cretaceous tyrannosaurid model measures 10cm long with a head height of around 6cm
  • Nasutoceratops – a beautiful horned dinosaur model which measures 13cm long with a head height of 6cm
  • Medusaceratops – a slightly larger horned dinosaur model which is 14.5cm in length with a head height of around 7.5cm
  • Daxiatitan – a model of a huge, Chinese Titanosaur which measures over 29cm long with a head height of a fraction under 21cm

Collecta Deluxe Pliosaurus Model

Collecta Pliosaurus model.

Collecta Pliosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This model measures 31cm in length and that bulky body stands around 6cm high.  The replica is based on a Dorset fossil specimen, a spectacular Pliosaur known as P. kevani which is known from a two metre long skull and jaw currently on display at the Dorset County Museum.  This Pliosaurus has Sea Lampreys attached to it. Although, we at Everything Dinosaur, are not aware of any fossil evidence to suggest Lampreys attaching themselves to marine reptiles, since a number of Sea Lampreys feed on Cetaceans in coastal waters today, it is likely that these ancient, jawless fish fed on the giant marine reptiles of the past.

Winner of Everything Dinosaur Competition Announced

Name an English Dinosaur “Anglosaurus lomaxi

In October, Everything Dinosaur ran a competition to win a signed copy of the terrific dinosaur book “Dinosaurs of the British Isles”.  This book, which was published in the summer, catalogues the dinosaur discoveries known from the British Isles and it was written by the highly talented Dean Lomax and Nobumichi Tamura.  Following a foreward by the eminent palaeontologist Dr. Paul Barrett, the authors summarise what is known about the history of every dinosaur species discovered within the British Isles.

The Front Cover of “Dinosaurs of the British Isles”

A comprehensive guide to British dinosaurs over 400 pages.

A comprehensive guide to British dinosaurs over 400 pages.

Picture Credit: Siri Scientific Press

Palaeontologist Dean Lomax kindly signed a copy and sent it over to Everything Dinosaur, we had a prize, now all we needed was a competition.  The contest we came up was to name an imaginary new species of English dinosaur.  We had so many imaginative entries, we can’t give everyone a mention but here’s a few…

  • “Herniornis Londonous” – Bubosaurus
  • “Ankyliceritops” – Heathyceritops
  • “Britanniasaurus” – Tom
  • “Blightyosaurus” – Aaron
  • “Elgaraptor” – Melanie
  • Ukinodon” – Ken
  • “Manteladon” – Darryl
  • “Forsythodon” – Eleanor
  • “Stiffupperliposaur” – Rosemary
  • “Anningosaurus” – Susan
  • “Kyleosaurus” – Wyatt
  • “Britisaurus” - Sarah
  • “Arthurodon” – Kevin

Honourable mentions to all these but the winning entry pulled out of the hat was “Anglosaurus lomaxi” posted up on Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page by Robert.  The name translates as “Lomaxi’s English Lizard”, which was very apt after all, this would not be the first dinosaur name to honour a palaeontologist.

To read more about the “Dinosaurs of the  British Isles”:  “Dinosaurs of the British Isles” Reviewed

To visit the publisher’s website and to order the book: Siri Scientific Press

Once again our congratulations to Robert and our thanks to everyone who took part.  Look out for more competitions on our Facebook page and on the Everything Dinosaur blog.

Congratulations to Diorama Winners

Dinosaur Toy Forum Winners Announced

Over the spring and summer, Everything Dinosaur sponsored a prehistoric animal modelling contest on the Dinosaur Toy Forum.  The standard of entries was extremely high and the subjects covered by the contestants varied and diverse.  There were scenes of many different types of dinosaur (the Papo Running T. rex being a particular favourite model used), Pterosaurs and some amazing marine reptiles, even some Temnospondyl amphibians entered the fray.  One of our personal favourites was “Life in the Precambrian” that used the innovative Toob of Precambrian critters made by Safari Ltd that came out last year.  It is always a pleasure to see how model makers use replicas imaginatively to recreate prehistoric scenes.

2014 Model Contest Sponsored by Everything Dinosaur

Proud to sponsor the competition.

Proud to sponsor the competition.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

It was not just the excellent model making skills on display that impressed Everything Dinosaur team members.  Lots of creative use of photoshop was evident and we loved the titles that the artists had given to their exhibits.  For example, there were entries entitled “Breakfast at Tiffany” which featured the Collecta Stegosaurus corpse, “Desert Stand off”, “Heatstroke” and “Triassic Swim Lessons”.  Our congratulations to everyone who entered, it seems that model making is in fine fettle if the standard of entries in this competition are anything to go by.

As with all contests of this nature, there have to be winners and first prize goes to the forum member known as Federreptil for “Horrible Horn Horde”.

“Horrible Horn Horde” by Federreptil

Congratulations to Federreptil.

Congratulations to Federreptil.

Picture Credit: Federreptil

The detail is exquisite, we recognise a number of models and replicas in this Late Cretaceous scene, commenting on the winner a spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur stated:

“Clearly a great deal of work has gone into this diorama and the attention to detail is fantastic.  Although, the eye is drawn to the herd of Ceratopsians in the foreground, we loved spotting the other prehistoric replicas included in the scene, from the prehistoric plants and trees to the various Pterosaurs including Azhdarchidae”.

This is the second year in a row that Federreptil has won the contest, will anyone be able to challenge this talented model maker in 2015?

Second prize, as voted for by forum members goes to Seismosaurus of the United States for their entry called “On the Beach”.  This is a clever composition that depicts the tracks left by a Sauropod as it wanders along the sand.  The model used is the excellent Wild Safari Dinos Apatosaurus model (Safari Ltd).

Apatosaurus Goes for a Wander Along the Sand

An excellent effort with great lighting.

An excellent effort with great lighting.

Picture Credit: Seismosaurus

Commenting on this composition, Sue Judd (Finance Director at Everything Dinosaur) explained:

“Although the model used is not that large, the artist has really created an impression of scale.  The angle of shot and the clever way in which the seascape background has been incorporated into the picture gives the impression of a huge Sauropod wandering along the shoreline of a Jurassic sea.”

Third place, in what was an incredibly tight contest, went to Irimali for the composition entitled “Separated from the Herd/Storm is Coming”.  A Camarasaurus is isolated and alone, or is it?  Lurking amongst the beautifully recreated Late Jurassic flora, a Theropod waits ready to pounce.

Third Prize Went to “Separated from the Herd/Storm is Coming” by Irimali

Great atmosphere created in diorama.

Great atmosphere created in diorama.

Picture Credit: Irimali

Commenting on the diorama, Mike Walley (Everything Dinosaur) said:

“The model maker has managed to create a very realistic Jurassic forest.  The models themselves are not the “stars” in this particular diorama, for us it is the way that the flora has been depicted.  The scene has been carefully constructed and the diorama has an eerie atmosphere enhanced by the clever use of the background which represents the misty depths of the forest.”

Everything Dinosaur will be in touch with the prize winners shortly so that their prizes (a selection of prehistoric animal models from Everything Dinosaur’s huge range), can be sent out to them.

Once again our congratulations to everyone who took part, we will try and feature the “honourable mentions” in a future blog post.

Do you feel inspired by the amazing prehistoric scenes that have been created in this contest?  Check out Everything Dinosaur’s huge range of prehistoric animal models and plants: Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models

First Pictures of New Collecta Prehistoric Animal Models Released

New for 2015 First Pictures of Collecta’s New Prehistoric Animal Models

A few days ago, Everything Dinosaur announced the list of prehistoric animal models that had been cleared for production and sale in 2015 by Collecta.   The list has been very well received by model collectors and dinosaur fans and it is great to see so many replicas being added to the Collecta range.  We can now reveal more details and show pictures of the models that will be part of the first releases next year.

The full list of models (cleared so far) is:

Here is what Collecta will be bringing out and Everything Dinosaur will be stocking next year.

Medusaceratops (trend for Ceratopsians continues)
Daxiatitan – Chinese Titanosaur
Nasutoceratops (what did we say about Ceratopsians and trends)?
Xiongguanlong (Early Cretaceous tyrannosaur)
1:40 scale Pliosaurus (marine reptiles rock)!
1:40 Acrocanthosaurus (articulated lower jaw)
1:40 Feathered T. rex (articulated lower jaw)
1:4 scale Pterosaur with moving jaw – Guidraco (Supreme range)
Moropus (knuckle-walker – Chalicothere)
Deluxe Smilodon (replacing the earlier not to scale Smilodon model)
Deluxe Daeodon (Entelodont)
Temnodontosaurus (an Ichthyosaur)

The first five prehistoric animals to be introduced are the Xiongguanlong (pronounced “shyong-gwan-long”), a primitive member of the Tyrannosaur family.  Then there is Medusaceratops, Nasutoceratops, two lovely horned dinosaurs.  The Deluxe Pliosaurus is also one of the first to be manufactured and then fifth, last but not least, is the spectacular model of the huge dinosaur called Daxiatitan.

Xiongguanlong (tyrannosauroid) Dinosaur

An agile, fearsome dinosaur.

An agile, fearsome dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

Formally named and described in January 2010, this long-snouted predator provided evidence that even in the Early Cretaceous some types of tyrannosaurid were growing into large predators.  At an estimated five metres in length, this dinosaur (X. baimoensis) represents one of the larger of the early Tyrannosaurs.  Evidence of a shaggy coat of feathers has been provided by the model makers and it is pleasing to note that the three-fingered hand (basal trait of the tyrannosaurids) has been reflected in this model.

Medusaceratops from Collecta

Named after the Greek Gorgon Medusa who had snakes for hair.

Named after the Greek Gorgon Medusa who had snakes for hair.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This dinosaur, like Xiongguanlong was also formally named and described in 2010.  The extensive horns, lumps and bumps (epoccipitals) on this dinosaur’s neck shield were spectacular, these have been lovingly re-created in the Collecta replica.  They may have had a defensive function but they also served as “bling” to help attract a mate and for display (probably).

To read Everything Dinosaur’s article on the discovery of Medusaceratops: A New Horned Dinosaur from Montana

Medusaceratops was a member of the Chasmosaurine group of horned dinosaurs.  The second major group, the Centrosaurines is represented by Nasutoceratops.

Collecta Nasutoceratops Dinosaur Model

Basal Centrosaurine dinosaur.

Basal Centrosaurine dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This mean and moody figure contrasts well with the Medusaceratops replica.  Nasutoceratops would have been slightly smaller than Medusaceratops, it roamed the swamps and lowlands on the western shores of that great inland sea that divided the Americas (the Western Interior Seaway).  One species has been assigned to this genus (Nasutoceratops titusi).  The very large and broad muzzle can be clearly seen on the Collecta replica.  We shall see how this model compares to the Safari Ltd Nasutoceratops which is also due out in early 2015.

Here is the article that we wrote announcing this dinosaur’s discovery: Large Nose, Horn Face

The first of the new Deluxe replicas due out next year is the model of the ferocious marine predator Pliosaurus.

Collecta Deluxe Pliosaurus Replica

Collecta Pliosaurus model.

Collecta Pliosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

We like the details around the jaw, the evidence of “battle damage” as a result of feeding from parasitic Lampreys on the flank and the beautiful colouration.  These are going to be exciting times for model collectors who have an affinity for marine reptiles.

Last but not least comes a replica of the Chinese Titanosaur Daxiatitan.  We have to confess that Chinese Titanosaurs is not our strong suit, probably because of the fragmentary fossil finds coupled with those complex names derived from regional dialects.  Daxiatitan binlingi is known from fragmentary fossils, including several huge cervical vertebrae (neck bones) and a femur.  Based on comparative studies with other basal Titanosaurs, it has been estimated that this huge dinosaur could have reached lengths in excess of thirty metres.  It had a very long, straight neck and it probably fed on the very tops of the trees, although its giraffe-like pose is still debated.  It certainly had a wide body and Daxiatitan is just one of a number of Titanosaurs known from the Hekou Group  in the Lanzhou Basin of Gansu Province (north-western, China).  The fossils of this dinosaur have helped researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences to piece together more information with regards to the evolution of titanosaurids.

The Collecta Daxiatitan Dinosaur Model

Perhaps up to 30 metres in length?

Perhaps up to 30 metres in length?

Picture Credit: Collecta/Everything Dinosaur

This is a very well crafted replica, that reflects what is known from the fossil record with regards to basal Titanosaurs.

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of Collecta prehistoric life figures and replicas: Collecta Prehistoric Life Models

For the Deluxe range of scale models: Collecta Deluxe Scale Models and Replicas

We look forward to posting up more information about Collecta’s 2015 range shortly.

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