Category: Press Releases

Palaeontology Predictions for 2017

Palaeontology Predictions for 2017

As 2017 commences, the start of a new year is often a good time to consider what changes, developments and news stories we might expect to blog about in the next twelve months.  For scientists, including those who specialise in the Earth sciences, 2017 will no doubt be filled with exciting discoveries.  The team at Everything Dinosaur has compiled a list of predictions, trying to guess what the next year will bring, it’s just a bit of fun, we shall see how things turn out in another year likely to be remembered for some remarkable fossil discoveries.

Here in no particular order are our predictions for 2017:

A New Epoch – Arise the Anthropocene!

The work of the Anthropocene Work Group (AWG), will once again enter the scientific spotlight as the debate regarding the introduction of new geological epoch to mark the trend in global warming “hots up”.  Our forecast, the 1950’s could be formally recognised as the start of the Anthropocene.

The Start of a New Geological Epoch Gains Further Acceptance

Plastic pollution, the impact of mankind on the environment

Non-biodegradable plastics and other debris on a beach – the impact of our species on the planet.

More Mini Dinos – The “Microsaurs” are Coming!

The very biggest dinosaurs (see next prediction), might get all the media attention, but team members at Everything Dinosaur foresee that more fossil evidence will emerge indicating a hither to virtually unknown type of dinosaur – very small Theropods, not much bigger than a mouse.  Tantalising evidence has emerged in recent years of tiny, bipedal dinosaurs that occupied an invertebrate hunting niche amongst the leaf litter of Mesozoic forests.  Small woodland animals generally have a very low fossil preservation potential and the delicate bones of such small creatures would be, in all likelihood, too fragile to survive fossilisation in all but the most perfect of geological circumstances.  However, improved CT scanning technology and a greater focus on the hunt for micro-fauna might just mean that 2017 becomes the year of the “Microsaur”!

More Fossil Evidence Suggesting Tiny Dinosaurs Predicted

The tiny dinosaur Minisauripus.

Minisauripus, potentially the smallest dinosaur known to science.

Picture Credit: Zhang Zongda/China Daily

“Enormosaurus” to Get a Formal Scientific Name

From the sublime to the ridiculous.  Early last year, the American Museum of Natural History erected a life-size cast of the largest dinosaur yet discovered, a huge 37-metre long giant from South America.  The dinosaur, a Titanosaur, is so large that it is just a bit too big for its new home the Wallach Orientation Centre on the museum’s fourth floor.  It’s head and neck extend out towards the visitor lifts.  Despite having been on public display for nearly a year, the fossilised remains of this Cretaceous monster have yet to be formally described.  We predict that “Enormosaurus” will get a binomial scientific name in 2017.

A Field Team Member Poses Next to the Giant Femur of “Enormosaurus”

Giant femur of a Titanosaur.

The thigh bone of one of the giant Titanosaurs.

Picture Credit: Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio (MEF)

In January 2016, Sir David Attenborough narrated a remarkable documentary all about this huge plant-eater.

To read our article about Sir David Attenborough and the huge Titanosaur: Attenborough and the Giant Dinosaur

Chinese Feathered Dinosaurs Get Us Brits into a Flap

With the arrival of the eagerly anticipated “Dinosaurs of China – Ground Shakers to Feathered Flyers” exhibition in the summer of 2017, Chinese dinosaurs are going to be very much in our thoughts but expect new research into feathered Theropods from China to hit the headlines this year as well.  The exhibition, which starts in July is a three-way partnership between the University of Nottingham, Nottingham City Council and the Chinese Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaeoanthropology.  Expect the likes of Gigantoraptor and Mamenchisaurus to cause a bit of a stir in the East Midlands.

Chinese Feathered Dinosaurs Are Coming to the UK

Gigantoraptor displays.

Feathers used for display and courtship.

Picture Credit: BBC Planet Dinosaur television series.

New Website from Everything Dinosaur

Plans are well advanced for a new website from Everything Dinosaur and we predict that it will go live in the early spring of this year.  It has lots more interactivity and it is mobile device friendly.  It should be live in time to welcome the myriad of new prehistoric animal models Everything Dinosaur intends to introduce over the next twelve months.

A Bigger, Better Everything Dinosaur Website for 2017

Everything Dinosaur's new website.

The new website from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Fossil Sites and Vandalism

Sadly, we also expect this year to feature several news stories and reports of deliberate damage to fossil sites and fossils from thoughtless collectors.  Stories of the deliberate damage and vandalism are becoming more commonplace and with the strong “black market” for dinosaur fossils driving demand, we are bracing ourselves for having to write a number of articles this year that involve damage to valuable scientific specimens and important fossil-rich locations.

Expecting to Report on More Cases of Damage and Vandalism

Smashed up fossils.

“Fossil Vandalism”

Picture Credit: Scottish National Heritage

Dinosaur Eggs Make the News

Last but not least, our final prediction for 2017 is that somewhere around the world, perhaps in Canada, Portugal or in India, a series of dinosaur eggs and fossil nests will be discovered.  A number of nest sites are known but dinosaur eggs and the potential embryos that they might contain remain exceptionally rare.  Let’s hope that we can blog about some “egg-citing” news in 2017.

Relatively Little is Known About Dinosaur Nesting Behaviour and Dinosaur Embryology

"Bony Bonnie" from Rebor.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

An Illustration of Coelophysis

A Drawing of Coelophysis

Time to reflect on the number of dinosaur and prehistoric animal fact sheets Everything Dinosaur has produced.  For virtually every named prehistoric animal we sell, our dedicated team members research and write a fact sheet on that animal.  From Acrocanthosaurus atokensis through to Yutyrannus huali and probably notes on Zuniceratops, Zalmoxes and Zephyrosaurus too!

It is not just new fact sheets that we have to sort out, we also have to re-write and update existing data when new dinosaur discoveries are made.  Take for example, the new Coelophysis fact sheet that we have been preparing.  We did have a fact sheet for this dinosaur on our files already, but with the introduction of the new for 2017 Wild Safari Prehistoric Life Coelophysis dinosaur model and with new research into the growth rate of this Triassic Theropod, we thought it was time to update it.

A New Illustration of Coelophysis has Been Commissioned by Everything Dinosaur

Coelophysis illustrated.

A scale drawing of the Triassic dinosaur Coelophysis.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Coelophysis bauri “Hollow Form”

Named over a hundred and twenty-five years ago, Coelophysis (C. bauri) has become one of the most studied Theropod dinosaurs of all.  The genus name means “hollow form”, a reference to this dinosaur’s almost hollow limb bones.  Light bones would have made this dinosaur surprisingly light and assisted with the animal’s agility and speed.  Assets when hunting but also useful when you need to avoid much larger terrestrial predators such as rauisuchids.

To read the recently published article about a study into the growth rates (ontogeny) of this Triassic dinosaur: Sizing Up Early Dinosaurs

Everything Dinosaur has recently taken into stock all thirteen of the newly introduced Wild Safari Prehistoric Life models.  The additions to our warehouse include the wonderful Coelophysis replica.

To see the new for 2017 Wild Safari Prehistoric Life Coelophysis dinosaur model: Prehistoric Animal Models by Safari Ltd

Happy New Year from Everything Dinosaur

Happy New Year from Everything Dinosaur

January 1st and time to thank all our readers and contributors to the Everything Dinosaur blog over the last twelve months.  We wish everyone a peaceful and prosperous 2017.  To mark the new year, we have created a colourful banner which we have posted up onto our Facebook page.

Everything Dinosaur Wishes Everyone a Happy New Year

Celebrating the start of 2017.

Happy New Year 2017.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Not sure why we put a Pterosaur on the banner, Pterosaurs are not traditionally associated with new year (not as far as we know), but the flying reptile was quite quick to photoshop and we like to add images of prehistoric animals to our banners and images, along with our logo of course.

Our Facebook page is just one of our many social media platforms, we use it to put up various additional pics of models, articles that have caught our attention, comments from customers and all sorts of dinosaur, fossil and palaeontology related information.

At the moment, we have an amazing 3,3o3 “likes” on our Facebook page.  Everyone is genuine and we would like to take this opportunity to thank all those wonderful people who have given Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page a “like”.  What sort of target should we set for 2017?  Perhaps we should set a target of 4,000 “likes”, to achieve that milestone over the next twelve months would be fantastic!

We believe customer service is the key to getting "likes".

Target for 2017 is 4,000 earned “likes”.

Feel free to click on the Facebook logo to visit Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page, or simply click this link: Visit Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook Page

New for 2017

Everything Dinosaur has big plans for 2017, look out for our brand new website launching in February…

In the meantime,

Happy New Year!

Favourite Articles of 2016 (Part 2)

Favourite Blog Articles July to December 2016

Here is the second part of our feature that highlights the favourite posts on this blog, as suggested by Everything Dinosaur team members.  Yesterday, we published our review of the first six months of 2016, here is the lowdown on our personal favourites from July through to December.

To read about our favourite Everything Dinosaur blog articles January to June 2016: Favourite Everything Dinosaur Blog Articles (Part 1)

July

Summer was here, although the weather was not much to write home about, good job there were plenty of palaeontology themed news stories to keep us occupied.  In July 2016, we wrote about the announcement of a new, dinosaur themed novel by the “Jurassic Park” author Michael Crichton.  Cambrian suspension feeders, the brains of lungfish, a new two-fingered meat-eating dinosaur from Argentina (Gualicho shinyae) and the heart-warming story of the return of Pterosaur fossils to Lebanon.  However, our personal favourite story that month came from South America, the footprint of a huge, meat-eating dinosaur, very probably an enormous abelisaurid had been discovered in Bolivia.

That’s a Very Large Trace Fossil!

A footprint of a giant abelisaurid dinosaur.

Huge meat-eating dinosaur footprint discovered in southern Bolivia.

Picture Credit: EFE

To read the story: The Footprint of a Giant Abelisaurid

August

Everything Dinosaur staff may have been busy preparing their dinosaur workshops for the start of the school year, but that did not stop them writing a blog article every day in August.   The team wrote about Marsupial Lions, Chinese primate fossils, the oldest Archaeopteryx found to date, Late Carboniferous shark cannibals and, continuing the Elasmobranchii theme, that a horror film starring Megalodon would be released soon.  Our favourite article was published at the very end of the month, a story about the recently described “Monster of Minden”, fragmentary fossils that suggest that some 163 million years ago, a giant meat-eating dinosaur roamed the land which we now know as Northrhine-Westphalia (Germany).

Wiehenvenator albati – Giant Megalosaur of Germany

The skull and jaws of Wiehenvenator.

The skull and jaw fossils located in their anatomical position (Wiehenvenator).

Picture Credit:

Wiehenvenator article: The Monster of Minden

September

Stories and features about Long-tailed Pterosaurs, how dogs assisted our ancestors, huge dinosaurs of the Gobi Desert and microbial structures that might have existed some 3.7 billion years ago helped take our minds off the shortening days and the falling leaves.  However, our favourite article was published on September 15th.  It described the research undertaken to reveal the camouflage and countershading of the Early Cretaceous dinosaur Psittacosaurus, just a few weeks later, team members were able to view the Psittacosaurus fossil, upon which this research was based, for themselves.

A Model of Psittacosaurus Showing the Countershading as Suggested in the New Study

Psittacosaurus model in the Bristol Botanic Garden.

Psittacosaurus photographed in the Bristol Botanic Garden.

Picture Credit: Jakob Vinther (model made by Bob Nicholls)

Psittacosaurus Colours and Camouflage: Calculating the Colours of Psittacosaurus

October

 Two new species of British Ichthyosaur swimming into view, the extremes found in Tetrapod limbs, giant Titanosaurs, dinosaur brains from Bexhill-on-Sea and the fossils of an Australian prehistoric swordfish all featured in October.  The article we have singled out concerns the meticulous research undertaken to identify the vocalisation organ in the fossilised remains of a Late Cretaceous bird.  This study, literally provided a “sound bite” of life in the Late Cretaceous of Antarctica, around 66 million years ago.

Vegavis iaai – Honking with Dinosaurs?

The vocalisation of dinosaurs and birds.

Vegavis takes off whilst a male Theropod dinosaur vocalises close by.

Picture Credit: Nicole Fuller/Sayo Art for University of Texas at Austin.

Birds that honked in the Late Cretaceous: Ancient Voice Box Provides an Insight into Late Cretaceous Dawn Chorus

November

Highlights last month included writing about the decoding of the Ginkgo genome, the hunt for Troodon, proteins found in fossil dinosaur claws and the myriad of new models coming into Everything Dinosaur’s warehouse next year.  We focus on an article that was based on research published in “Current Biology”.  The fossils of a lagerpetid (dinosaur precursor) and an early dinosaur had been discovered in the same rocks.  This was the first time that this had been recorded and these fossils challenged existing ideas about when the Dinosauria became the dominant terrestrial vertebrates.

The Skull of the Sauropodomorph Dinosaur Buriolestes

Buriolestes skull at the dig site.

The skull of the sauropodomorph Buriolestes.

Picture Credit: Cabreira et al

The article: Just When Did the Dinosaurs Dominate the Land?

December

Fossilised bacteria shedding light on life before oxygen, the variation in body size within Australopithecus afarensis, gorgonopsids with benign tumours, Didelphodon with a bite more powerful than a Hyena, all worthy contenders for December, but we could not let the opportunity pass to comment once again on one of the most remarkable fossil discoveries made, not just this year, but perhaps this Century.  December saw the publishing of a scientific paper on the discovery of part of a dinosaur tail preserved in burmite (amber from Myanamar).

The Tale of a Tail

A tiny dinosaur tail preserved in amber.

The exquisitely preserved dinosaur tail in amber.

Picture Credit: R. McKellar/Royal Saskatchewan Museum

Dinosaur tail preserved in amber: The Tale of a Dinosaur Tail

This story, perhaps more than any other article we have published on the Everything Dinosaur blog, demonstrates that there are still some amazing fossil discoveries to be made.  Who knows what news stories will feature on this blog site in 2017?  We could make some predictions, that might make a theme for a feature published in the early New Year, or we could just wait and see…

Favourite Articles of 2016 (Part 1)

Favourite Articles January to June 2016

At Everything Dinosaur, we try and post up an article on this blog site every day.  This is quite a challenge considering all our other projects and activities, however, as a result of our work on this particular weblog we have managed to build up a huge amount of information, features and articles chronicling (for the most part), advances in the Earth sciences and new fossil discoveries.  Several readers have emailed us and asked us to highlight some of our own favourite news stories that we have written about over the last twelve months or so.  With over 350 articles to choose from, that’s quite a tough challenge, but one we readily accept, so here are our favourites from the first six months of 2016.

January

January 2016 saw us writing about Canada’s first Dimetrodon, dinosaur trace fossils that suggested courtship displays and the discovery of a giant crocodile’s fossils in Tunisia.  However, our favourite story relates the tale of a beachcomber finding proof that enormous elephants once roamed the Isle of Wight.  Fossil hunting is an activity that is not just for the professionals if you look in the right places and get lucky, you too can make an important discovery that contributes to scientific understanding.

 Finder of the Prehistoric Elephant Fossil Paul Hollingshead Poses with his Proud Children

Isle of Wight prehistoric elephant fossil discovery.

Paul and his family show off their fossil find behind an Iguanodon exhibit.

To read the article: Prehistoric Elephants Roamed the Isle of Wight

February

There was no shortage of news stories in the shortest month of the year.  During February, we blogged about Terror Birds of the High Arctic, Doedicurus DNA and the discovery of a new abelisaurid from South America, that might turn out to be one of the smallest of these meat-eating dinosaurs described.  However, our favourite piece was posted up on February 10th, when we wrote about the discovery of two new types of suspension feeding Cretaceous fish.  Plus, we also got the opportunity to publish a painting by the brilliant and so talented palaeoartist Bob Nicholls.

An Illustration of One of the Giant Cretaceous Plankton Feeders – Rhinconichthys

An illustration of Rhinconichthys.

Large filter-feeding fish of the Cretaceous.

Picture Credit: Bob Nicholls

To read the article: Cretaceous Big Mouths!

March

Polar dinosaurs, the demise of the Ichthyosaurs caused by climate change and a study linking the extinction of the hominin H. floresiensis to our (H. sapiens) arrival on the island of Flores, all proved very popular articles with our blog readership, but in the end, we have singled out our story about the resolution of where in the tree of life the bizarre Tully Monster sits.  After six decades of debate, an international team of researchers, including scientists from Yale University, published a paper that classified Tullimonstrum gregarium as a soft-bodied vertebrate, one that is related to extant jawless fish such as Hagfish and the Lamprey.  The Tully Monster had finally found a home.

One of the Strangest Creatures That Ever Lived is Finally Classified

The bizarre Tullimonstrum gregarium.

The “Tully Monster” is classified as a soft-bodied vertebrate.

Picture Credit: Sean McMahon (Yale University)

Tully Monster Riddle solved: Tully Monster Puzzle Solved

April

Talk about “April showers”, we were showered with press releases from museums and universities in April, leading us to blog about all sorts of weird and wonderful things – ancient arachnids, a Silurian “kite runner”, prehistoric dolphins, seed-eating Late Cretaceous survival strategies and the fifty-million-year dinosaur decline.  Our favourite article, as agreed by Everything Dinosaur team members, was written on April 17th, a story about a dedicated graduate student working alongside some of the most famous palaeontologists in the world, who identified a new species of dinosaur – Apatoraptor pennatus.

A New Species of Late Cretaceous Dinosaur from Canada (A. pennatus)

Apatoraptor pennatus

The presence of ulnar papillae on the ulna (bone of the forelimb) indicates the presence of long feathers on the arm.

Picture Credit: The equally talented palaeoartist Sydney Mohr

Apatoraptor news story: Canadian Dinosaurs were Show Offs

May

Giant Patagonian Titanosaurs, baby Titanosaurs, Atopodentatus unzipped, a new species of prehistoric dog, exquisite horseshoe crab fossils from Nova Scotia, bizarre Brazilian crocodiles and calculating the bite force of a Stegosaurus, these were just some of the stories that occupied our writing team.  A favourite, was one that was published on “Star Wars day” – May 4th, tiny three-toed tracks preserved in rock indicate that some of the Theropod dinosaurs may have been very small indeed.   Team members at Everything Dinosaur are aware of a growing body of evidence to suggest that some members of the Theropoda were no bigger than a mouse, we have nick-named this group “leaf litter dinosaurs”.  One of these tiny Theropods ran across a stretch of mud some 125 million years ago and its prints were preserved, providing yet another tantalising clue to miniature dinosaurs, the genus Minisauripus was erected, a name for a dinosaur distantly related to Giganotosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex, but no bigger than a sparrow.

Minisauripus Runs Across the Mud Flat Chased by a Bigger Theropod Dinosaur

The tiny dinosaur Minisauripus.

Minisauripus, potentially the smallest dinosaur known to science.

Picture Credit: Zhang Zongda/China Daily

To read about Minisauripus: The Smallest Dinosaur of All?

June

Was the primordial snake Tetrapodophis an accomplished swimmer?  What’s the significance of ancient rock paintings found in a remote cave 7,000 feet up in the Alps?  What did the giant meat-eating dinosaur, whose fossilised tracks were found in India, look like?  How do you build a museum to house the bones of the biggest dinosaurs who ever lived?  These and a whole range of other questions were tackled in June 2016, but the article we have chosen to highlight involves the discovery of a new species of British marine reptile made by the English palaeontologist Dean Lomax.  The new species is an Ichthyosaur (Wahlisaurus massarae), the fossil specimen “nosedived” into sediment prior to permineralisation and this unusual taphonomy prevented a new species of marine reptile from surfacing until the middle of June 2016.

Wahlisaurus massarae – A New Species of British Marine Reptile

New species of Early Jurassic Ichthyosaur announced.

New species of Early Jurassic Ichthyosaur announced.

Picture Credit: James McKay

To read the article: A New Species of British Marine Reptile Surfaces

 Part two of this article, a list of our favourite articles published in the last six months will be posted up shortly.

Christmas Holidays and the Despatch of Orders

Despatching Parcels for Customers

With Christmas day falling on a Sunday in 2016, Everything Dinosaur has made arrangements to help with the despatch of orders placed by customers over the Christmas holiday period.  Our dedicated team members will be working throughout the festive holiday period, but the vast majority of the UK and international mail distribution networks will be closed down.  Orders placed over the period from Saturday, December 24th up to the early morning of Wednesday, December 28th, will not be sent out until late morning on the 28th.

In order to ensure a rapid despatch of orders received, customer orders will be prepared, checked and packed over this period, so that they are all ready for sending out as quickly as possible.  Normal service, will of course, resume on the 29th and 30th of December.

Orders Placed After 24th December Being Prepared for a Rapid Despatch

Everything Dinosaur parcels.

Checking parcel dimensions to ensure a prompt despatch.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

At the moment, customers who place an order will be sent the following message as part of the order acknowledgement email:

“your parcel will be despatched on the next full working day after the Christmas holidays (December 28th).”

Mail Networks

Both UK and international networks will take a little time to settle back into the normal working routine.  Some parcels may not have moved too far in the network before the next holiday period (New Year), however, Everything Dinosaur’s dedicated staff are working hard to ensure that customer’s parcels are sent out quickly to avoid any unnecessary delays.

Happy Christmas from Everything Dinosaur

Happy Christmas from Everything Dinosaur

The big day has finally arrived and on behalf of everyone at Everything Dinosaur, we would just like to wish everybody a happy Christmas.  Seasons greetings to one and all.  Team members will be taking a short break for the festive period, but we will be looking at our emails and sorting out orders for customers.  Orders received will be sent out on the next full working day after the Christmas break, that’s Tuesday 28th December, when our annual stock take will be in full swing.

Happy Christmas From Everything Dinosaur

Wishing everyone a happy Christmas.

Happy Christmas from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We will be back with business as usual once the Christmas, Boxing and Bank holidays are over.  A special thank you to all those very kind people who sent us prehistoric animal themed Christmas cards, gifts and drawings, they certainly have brightened up the offices and the warehouse.

For those of you tucking into turkey, goose or chicken for Christmas, remember, you are eating a dinosaur!

Happy Christmas!

Everything Dinosaur to the Rescue

Last Minute Shopping – Last Minute Christmas Lists

Just three more sleeps until the big day!  Everything Dinosaur team members know how stressful this time of year can be for mums, dads, grandparents and guardians of young dinosaur fans.  Take for example, an email received along with an order that arrived in our inbox just after 5am this morning. Mum had only just got her little boy’s Christmas list last night and he had asked Santa Claus to give him a Tyrannosaurus rex face mask as a present.

Young Dinosaur Fan Wants T. rex Face mask for Christmas

A Tyrannosaurus rex face mask.

A T. rex face mask.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Not to worry mum, we have been up even earlier than usual this morning, just in case something like this might happen.  The parcel will be checked, packed and despatched in double-quick time.  In fact, rather than wait for a collection from the warehouse, this very important package, along with all the other orders that have come in overnight will be taken to our local post office this morning by a team member.  These parcels will all go out with the first collection from the post office this morning.  We know it is getting very close to the big day and that Royal Mail have stated that the last guaranteed posting date for Christmas delivery for first class letters and parcels was yesterday (Wednesday 21st), but our dedicated staff are doing all they can to get parcels to customers in time for the big day.

Our prompt packing and despatch should give these customer orders every chance of making it in time.  Nothing is guaranteed, especially with the current industrial action in the UK mail network, but at least Everything Dinosaur can be relied upon to get orders packed and sent out as quickly as possible, with the minimum of delay.

Updating the Deinocheirus Fact Sheet

Deinocheirus Fact Sheet is Updated

One of the wonderful things about vertebrate palaeontology is that ideas about prehistoric animals are changing all the time.  Fossil discoveries and new research often challenges existing assumptions leading to a revision of data.  Model making companies often reflect the changing views about a long extinct animal by introducing a new version of that animal to their prehistoric animal model portfolio.  CollectA for example, recently introduced a new model of the bizarre Late Cretaceous Theropod Deinocheirus (D. mirificus).  In addition, CollectA will be bringing out a new Deluxe version of Deinocheirus in 2017.  This means, that for Everything Dinosaur team members, there is a need to update and revise the company’s Deinocheirus fact sheet.

The New Scale Drawing of Deinocheirus from Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus mirificus scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Deinocheirus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus – Taller than a Lamppost!

Thanks to two new fossil discoveries (a sub-adult found in 2006 and the fossils of a much larger individual discovered in 2009), palaeontologists have a much better idea about what this giant ornithomimid looked like.  As a result, further changes to the Everything Dinosaur fact sheet have been made.  In the original data sheet, prepared in 2012, prior to the scientific paper providing the new description, it was stated that the known fossils ascribed to Deinocheirus represented one of the largest Theropods from Asia.  This remains true, however, an assessment of the fossilised bones of the individual found in 2009, including a humerus six centimetres longer than the holotype, indicate that Deinocheirus reached a length of around eleven metres.  Subsequent study of the strongly reinforced pelvis and the robust hind limbs have led palaeontologists to reconsider how heavy this animal might have been.  It probably had a narrower stance than the pot-bellied Therizinosaurs, but scientists estimate that Deinocheirus might have weighed as much as six tonnes and it would have stood around five metres tall.

The New for 2017 CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Deinocheirus Replica

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus model.

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We look forward to the arrival of the new CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Deinocheirus replica and the other exciting new models to be added to CollectA’s “Prehistoric Life” model range.

To read more about the new CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus: New CollectA Models for 2017 (part 2)

Rebor 1:1 Scale Lourinhanosaurus Embryonic Skeleton Reviewed

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Embryonic Skeleton

The latest edition to the Rebor “Club Selection” range is this wonderful Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton replica.   Those clever people at Rebor have got together with the EoFauna Scientific Research Group and created a 1:1 scale replica of a Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton.  This model has been affectionately nick-named “Bony Bonnie” and with only 1,000 figures made, it is certainly going to have rarity value.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Embryonic Skeleton Replica

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica.

The 1:1 scale Rebor Club Selection limited edition Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Based on Actual Fossil Material

The large meat-eating dinosaur known as Lourinhanosaurus has been described from a single, partial skeleton and other fragmentary fossils including a thigh bone, all from the Upper Jurassic strata of the Lourinhã Formation on the western coast of Portugal.  The holotype material (the fossils upon which the genus description is based), consists of vertebrae, a few ribs, bones from the hips and some leg bones including a single pes (toe bone).  The first fossils of Lourinhanosaurus were found by a local farmer in 1982, it was not until 1998 that this dinosaur was formally scientifically named and described.  The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi 1:1 scale replica is based on actual fossil material (specimen number ML 565).  Back in 1993, a scientist found the remains of over one hundred dinosaur eggs, some of which contained complete fossilised embryos.  These egg fossils were assigned to L. antunesi.  The scientist who discovered the egg fossils was Isabel Mateus, the mother of the Portuguese palaeontologist Octávio Mateus who was responsible for the scientific description of this Theropod.

A Close-up View of the Beautiful Skull of the Rebor Lourinhanosaurus Replica

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica, close up of the head.

The 1:1 scale Rebor Club Selection limited edition Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton model. A close-up of the head.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of Rebor replicas available at Everything Dinosaur, including the limited edition (only 1,000 made), Rebor 1:1 scale Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton: Rebor Prehistoric Animal Models and Replicas

Rebor’s “Bony Bonnie”

This is the fourth model to be added to the Rebor Club Selection range and like the previous three, “Bony Bonnie” has been skilfully crafted and shows lots of amazing detail.  There is much to be admired in the skeleton model, which is a fraction under nineteen centimetres in length.  Naturally, once hatched the baby Lourinhanosaurus would have been much longer and if it made adulthood it would have grown into a formidable predator, perhaps exceeding eight metres in length and weighing as much as a Jaguar E-type sports car.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Embryonic Skeleton Model

"Bony Bonnie" from Rebor.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Close-up View of the Egg

Much has been said about the skeleton model, it really is a fantastic piece, but at Everything Dinosaur we would like to conclude by focusing on the broken egg element of the replica that forms the stand for the skeleton.   Lots of detail is shown on the broken egg component of the replica with the typical pits and marks associated with dinosaur egg shell.

The Broken Egg Stand for the Lourinhanosaurus Embryonic Skeleton

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus egg.

The broken egg stand for the Rebor Club Selection limited edition Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Rebor in conjunction with the EoFauna Scientific Research Group must have studied dinosaur eggshell fossils before embarking on this sculpt.  The eggshell is very robust and sturdy and makes an extremely effective stand complimenting the skeleton element of the model.  The name plate on the piece gives the impression of brass and the scientific name has even been inscribed in an italic font, as per scientific convention.

Our congratulations to Rebor and EoFauna Scientific Research Group for this super new addition to the Rebor Club Selection model range.

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