Category: Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products

My First Toy Dinosaurs Model Set

My First Toy Dinosaurs Model Set (6 Rubber Dinosaurs)

Great for imaginative, creative play, a set of six rubber dinosaurs from Everything Dinosaur.  An ideal gift for the young dinosaur fan in your family or as a play set for use in schools.  The set of six dinosaur models includes a Tyrannosaurus rex, a long-necked Brachiosaurus, the plated dinosaur Stegosaurus, along with a bright and colourful duck-billed dinosaur, a Parasaurolophus.  The set also includes a horned dinosaur (Triceratops) and a wonderful armoured dinosaur, an Ankylosaurus.  This set of soft rubber dinosaurs makes an ideal my first dinosaurs model set as these prehistoric animals are suitable for children from three years and upwards.

My First Toy Dinosaurs Model Set (6 Rubber Dinosaurs)

A set of six rubber dinosaurs, great for tactile play.

A set of six rubber dinosaurs, great for tactile play.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The teaching team at Everything Dinosaur have specially chosen this toy dinosaurs set as the models represent typical examples of dinosaurs and show the variety of these ancient reptiles that once roamed our planet.  The models are made from soft rubber and they are great for imaginative, tactile play.

To view the range of educational dinosaur toys available from Everything Dinosaur: Dinosaur Toys including Rubber Dinosaur Toys

This really is a super set of soft and squeezy rubber dinosaurs.  The set makes an ideal, my first dinosaur model set for any young dinosaur fan.  They are a great way for young minds to explore materials and discover the world of dinosaurs.

One of our customers wrote this review:

“Loved the colourful models, six different ones that my little boy just loves.  A great first dinosaur  model set.  Soft and squeezy rubber dinosaurs, very well made.”

Thanks for your review Mrs Jacobs.

Everything Dinosaur supplies a set of useful dinosaur fact sheets about the animals featured in this set.  This is a great dinosaur themed resource for schools.

Rise and Shine with Dinosaurs

Dinosaur Alarm Clock from Everything Dinosaur

Do you have trouble getting your little monsters out of bed?   Here’s a handy solution from Everything Dinosaur that is bound to get dinosaur fans roaring with excitement, a colourful dinosaur themed alarm clock.  The large, easy to see hands make telling the time a doddle even if your dinosaur brain is the size of a walnut.  The face of the clock measures around ten centimetres in diameter and it features three very colourful prehistoric animals.  Can you spot the Triceratops?

No Need to Get Alarmed – A Dinosaur Alarm Clock

Dinosaur alarm clock.

Dinosaur alarm clock.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The numbers on the dial are very clear and the alarm lever is a different colour from the hands of the clock so that it can be easily spotted.  This dinosaur alarm clock has child-friendly time settings and controls.  It requires 1 x AA battery (not supplied).

To view the dinosaur alarm clock at Everything Dinosaur: Dinosaur Bedding Accessories

Help your little monsters to raise and shine with this super dinosaur themed alarm clock.  An ideal accessory for a dinosaur fan’s bedroom.

The Dinosaur Alarm Clock

Rise and shine with dinosaurs.

Rise and shine with dinosaurs.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In Praise of Pegasus Hobbies Dinosaurs

Pegasus Dinosaur Model Kits – Produce Top Quality Models

Everything Dinosaur has added a number of new product lines to its range of dinosaur inspired merchandise over the last six months or so.  One new addition is the superb series of scale model kits from Pegasus Hobbies.  Currently, there are three to collect, a Triceratops, the Tyrannosaurus rex and a fantastic Spinosaurus.  Each kit has been designed by top figure sculptors and they are aimed at model makers from fourteen years and upwards.  Fans of top quality dinosaur replicas have the opportunity to produce museum quality, highly professional prehistoric animal themed dioramas and we have been really impressed by the many pictures sent into us by customers who have built these kits.

Pegasus Dinosaur Model Kits – A Range of Top Quality Prehistoric Animal Model Kits

Pegasus Hobbies Dinosaur model kits are available from Everything Dinosaur.

Pegasus Hobbies Dinosaur model kits are available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To see Everything Dinosaur’s range of Pegasus Hobbies Dinosaurs: Pegasus Dinosaur Model Kits

We are always pleased to hear from our customers and we really enjoy looking at pictures of dinosaur fan’s model collections.  We know that we have some very talented customers, some of the photographs that we are sent show fantastic and highly creative prehistoric animal dioramas.  Take for example, these pictures of a finished Pegasus dinosaur model kit sent in by David – they really are most impressive.

The Pegasus Spinosaurus Model Kit

Beautifully crafted model.

Beautifully crafted model.

Picture Credit: D. Wigley

The photograph above shows the amazing detail on the model.  The colour scheme chosen by David reminds us of the Papo Spinosaurus figure and the end result is a fantastic diorama.  The Spinosaurus, which scientists believe was a specialist piscivore, has caught a large fish and it is leaning over the body roaring.

A Close up of the Prehistoric Fish that the Spinosaurus has Caught

Xiphactinus, the victim of the Spinosaurus.

Xiphactinus, the victim of the Spinosaurus.

Picture Credit: D. Wigley

David has done a wonderful job on the fish, the metallic look to the scales and careful painting on the inside of the mouth make this feature on the model’s base really stand out.  Everything Dinosaur would like to congratulate David and all the other Pegasus Hobbies dinosaurs fans who have sent in pictures.

In addition to the photographs sent in, we have received lots of feedback and reviews on the Pegasus dinosaur model kits.  For example, Andrew wrote in to say:

“This model kit is of Sideshow Dinosauria quality, the sculpt is even sharper in the teeth than the promotional photographs.  The head fits perfectly on the base and the standing leg is of a more rigid plastic than the rest of the kit to hold the model rigidly when assembled.  Make no mistake, this will impress the most discerning of collectors, it truly is a fantastic model of Sideshow Collectible quality.”

Plastic Dinosaur Skeleton Models – Great for Creative Play

Plastic Dinosaur Skeletons from Everything Dinosaur

A term topic on dinosaurs for Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) can provide a number of opportunities for young minds to develop through creative play.  Most children are fascinated by dinosaurs and prehistoric animals and Everything Dinosaur team members often get asked by teachers and teaching assistants for ideas on how to stimulate the class when the children have been learning about dinosaurs.  We recommend a wide range of tactile activities to help young learners explore the nature of materials and the wider world.  For example, this set of twelve plastic prehistoric animal skeletons gives the children the chance to play at being a palaeontologist.

Prehistoric Animal Skeleton Set Available from Everything Dinosaur

A set of assorted prehistoric animal and dinosaur skeletons.

A set of assorted prehistoric animal and dinosaur skeletons.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

These robust, plastic skeleton models represent a number of very well known dinosaurs.  Prehistoric creatures such as Triceratops, Stegosaurus and Brachiosaurus.  There are even some meat-eating dinosaurs and a Pterosaur (Pteranodon), in this twelve figure set.  We bury these models in the sand pit play area at the school and invite the children to excavate their own dinosaur fossils using paint brushes and plastic spades.  This is a fun activity  and the addition of a couple of magnifying glasses so that the children can examine the bones helps the pupils to feel like scientists.  These models can also be used in the wet play area as children explore which objects float.  They are a wonderful resource for Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS plastic dinosaur skeletons).

Use the Models to Make Impressions Just Like Fossils

Showing how fossils form.

Showing how fossils form.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

By pressing these study models into modelling clay the children can learn how fossils form and they can have a go at making fossils for themselves.  Each of these little models is around ten centimetres in length and as there are twelve in the series they are very useful when it comes to playing sorting and counting games, for example:

  • Sort out all the skeletons of animals that have horns
  • Group the skeletons into those that walk on four legs and those that walk on just two
  • Split the plant-eaters from the meat-eaters – can you work out which is which?

The models have a remarkable level of detail on them, the children can easily work out which model is which.  The other day, a five-year-old pointed out the Dimetrodon (not a dinosaur) to us.  We were most impressed!

To view the range of educational products available from Everything Dinosaur including these skeleton models: Educational Dinosaur Themed Learning Resources from Everything Dinosaur

We Even Used Our Dinosaur Skeletons to Make Footprints

A cheap but very effective learning resource.

A cheap but very effective learning resource.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To see the full range of educational toys, games and models that Everything Dinosaur offers: Everything Dinosaur

Rebor Ceratosaurus “Savage” and Everything Dinosaur

Rebor Ceratosaurus “Savage”

The latest edition to the highly regarded Rebor collection of prehistoric animal replicas, a 1:35 scale model of Ceratosaurus, is due at our warehouse in the next few days or so.  Fans of dinosaurs are excited about the prospect of adding a Ceratosaurus to their growing collection of Rebor replicas.  A number of species of Ceratosaurus have been described, all of them dating from the Late Jurassic, although fossils have been found both in the United States, Portugal and China, indicating that this genus must have been very widespread towards the end of the Jurassic period.  Most of the fossils of this Theropod dinosaur come from the Morrison Formation (western United States), although it is not the most common meat-eating dinosaur from the Morrison, at least in terms of the number of fossils found.  That honour belongs to the Allosaurus genus.

The Rebor Collection 1:35 scale “Savage” Ceratosaurus Replica

Available from Everything Dinosaur.

Available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Palaeontologists debate just how big Ceratosaurus actually was.  The Ceratosaurus species represented in the Rebor replica is Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus, one of the largest species of Ceratosaurus described to date.  The model has an articulated lower jaw and it has been sculpted in very fine detail.  Ceratosaurus is the only Theropod dinosaur that had a row of osteoderms running down its back.  These armoured scales would have made this dinosaur look like a giant, terrestrial crocodile.  Like all Ceratosaurs, it had a relatively long tail in proportion to the rest of its body.  The species name was given as the teeth associated with this particular species, are proportionately large and more recurved than those teeth associated with Ceratosaurus nasicornis.

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of Rebor replicas: Rebor Collection Replicas

The Dorsal View (Viewed from the Top Down) Shows the Row of Osteoderms

The characteristic bony armour (ossicles and osteoderms) can be clearly made out.

The characteristic bony armour (ossicles and osteoderms) can be clearly made out.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

 ”Savage” the Rebor replica Ceratosaurus will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur in a about three days.  In addition, the company is expecting more “Wind Hunter” Utahraptor replicas and some rare “Jolly” the hatching Triceratops figures.

To reserve one of these highly collectible replicas simply email Everything Dinosaur: Contact Everything Dinosaur

“Savage” The Ceratosaurus Countdown – Two Weeks!

Rebor Ceratosaurus “Savage” Available Around Mid April

The next edition in the highly acclaimed Rebor replica series will be arriving at Everything Dinosaur shortly.  A spokesperson for the company stated that the shipment of 1:35 scale Ceratosaurus replicas could be at the company’s warehouse as early as the middle of April.  The Ceratosaurus is the fourth replica in the Rebor Collection to be introduced, it is also the fourth Theropod dinosaur ( it joins Yutyrannus, Tyrannosaurus rex and Utahraptor).   Unlike the other meat-eating dinosaurs in this very collectible series, the genus Ceratosaurus actually consists of a number of species.  At least six different species have been assigned although a number are regarded as nomen dubium, this contrasts with the other carnivorous dinosaurs so far depicted by Rebor which only have one species within their genus.  It could be argued that there is a second species within Tyrannosaurus (T. bataar), but at Everything Dinosaur we tend to support the hypothesis that although North American tyrannosaurids are descended from Asian Tyrannosaurs, the distinct genus for Tarbosaurus remains valid.

New Rebor Replica on the Block –  1:35 Scale Ceratosaurus

Available from Everything Dinosaur from Mid April.

Available from Everything Dinosaur from Mid April.

Picture Credit: Rebor/Everything Dinosaur

The Ceratosaurus has been nick-named “Savage” and it is a representation of one of the largest of the Ceratosaurus species named so far (C. dentisulcatus).  This species was erected in 2000 A.D. after a re-assessment of a particularly large specimen found in the famous Cleveland-Lloyd quarry in Utah (Morrison Formation).  Although believed to represent a single dinosaur, the bones that were used to establish this new, larger species of Ceratosaurus were found over a period of many years and from a number of locations (but within the same horizon), within the dig site.  It has been estimated that Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus could have reached a length around 8.5 metres, one third longer than the first species of Ceratosaurus named by Othniel Charles Marsh back in the mid 1880′s.  Like all the Ceratosaurs, it had a relatively long tail compared to the rest of its body.  Marsh commented on the resemblance of the tail to a crocodile’s when he studied the bones that would be assigned to C. nasicornis, the first species to be named.  He suggested that this dinosaur would have been very much at home in the swampy regions of the Morrison and the tail would have helped this dinosaur to swim very effectively across the many large rivers and lakes that existed in this part of the United States back in the Late Jurassic.

The Skilfully Constructed Base Reflects the Swampy Home of Ceratosaurus

Skilfully hand-painted base

Skilfully hand-painted base

Picture Credit: Rebor/Ceratosaurus

The hand-painted base boasts realistic plants, logs, mud effect and even a puddle that’s made of transparent resin to create the impression of real water.  Although, Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus is known from a collection of bones thought to represent a single animal, all the material ascribed to this species come from the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation.  This is the youngest member of the Morrison, with strata dating from around 148 million years ago.  At this time, this part of the world was more humid and wetter than previously, desert areas had given way to lush, verdant habitats.  It seems likely that Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus was a dinosaur that lived in a wetland environment.  The details on the replica’s base reflect this and Rebor must be credited for the care and attention they have lavished on the development of an accurate base for their replica.

Intriguingly, although some cranial material has been ascribed to C. dentisulcatus, it is not known for sure whether this dinosaur actually possessed that signature nasal horn that gives this genus its name.  These bones have not been found, as far as we at Everything Dinosaur are aware.

Why Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus?

We asked our chums at Rebor why this particular species rather than the better known Ceratosaurus nasicornis?  C. nasicornis is the species that we at Everything Dinosaur based our own Ceratosaurus fact sheet upon and the first species to be identified within the genus.

A spokesperson for Rebor stated that there were several reasons behind their choice.  Firstly, C. dentisulcatus was a more massive and robust animal when compared to what is known about C. nasicornis.  The tibia (shinbones) for example are six centimetres longer and other direct comparisons indicate that Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus was a bigger and more formidable carnivore.  Rebor are aware that the fossil material first used to describe Ceratosaurus nasicornis very probably represents a sub-adult and that C. nasicornis could well have been much bigger and heavier than stated.  However, when you take into account those more recurved and substantially bigger teeth associated with C. dentisulcatus when compared to other Ceratosaurus species, you can understand the appeal of this particular Ceratosaurus species to a model manufacturer.  Incidentally, it is the larger and strongly recurved teeth in the premaxilla (upper jaw) and the front three teeth of the dentary (lower jaw) with their very visible parallel grooves running down their medial surface (inside facing) that give this species its name.  We speculate that these grooves helped inflict maximum damage with bites and that the grooves could have helped blood flow from wounds thus hastening the demise of victims – very nasty, the Dinosauria equivalent of “dum-dum” bullets!

A Comparison of Ceratosaurus magnicornis skull material with Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus

Although not to same scale the more strongly recurved teeth of C. dentisulcatus can be seen.

Although not to same scale the more strongly recurved teeth of C. dentisulcatus can be seen.

Picture Credit: Utah Geological Survey/Everything Dinosaur

In the diagram above, the left lateral views of skull material from C. magnicornis and C. dentisulcatus are compared.  Although the skull of C. magnicornis is more compressed and these diagrams are not to scale, the proportionately bigger and more curved teeth of Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus can be made out.  Ceratosaurus magnicornis, which is known from the lower part of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, but this time from exposures located in Colorado (Fruita, Colorado), was very probably larger than Ceratosaurus nasicornis, but perhaps not as big as C. dentisulcatus.  Direct size comparisons are difficult, as the holotype material associated with C.  magnicornis, just like C. nasicornis may represent a not fully grown animal.  What is interesting is that the nose horn on C. magnicornis is bigger, so it has been concluded that if Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus is larger still, then its nose horn was probably big too.  A large nose horn can be clearly seen on the Rebor replica.

A Dorsal View of the Rebor Ceratosaurus Model

The characteristic bony armour (ossicles and osteoderms) can be clearly made out.

The characteristic bony armour (ossicles and osteoderms) can be clearly made out.

Picture Credit: Rebor/Everything Dinosaur

“Savage”, the 1:35 scale Rebor Ceratosaurus replica is going to be available from Everything Dinosaur around mid April.  Could Ceratosaurus finally be stepping out into the limelight and join Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus in being regarded as an apex predator?

To view Everything Dinosaur’s Rebor range of models: Rebor Prehistoric Animal Replicas

The Last of the Carnegie Collection Acrocanthosaurus

Carnegie Collection Acrocanthosaurus (Model Number 403901)

First produced in 2001, the Carnegie Collection Acrocanthosaurus was a mainstay of this highly popular model series up until its retirement back in 2010.  The model was rarely found in ordinary toy shops with their plethora of T. rex, Stegosaurus and Triceratops replicas and genuine dinosaur model collectors had to seek this one out more often than not.  Acrocanthosaurus (A. atokensis) was one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs of North America during the Early Cretaceous.  It has been estimated to have reached lengths in excess of twelve metres and footprints found in Texas (USA), might be those of this huge Theropod dinosaur and, if so, they indicate that this dinosaur may have hunted in packs.

Model Number 403901 Carnegie Collection Acrocanthosaurus

Acrocanthosaurus dinosaur model - Carnegie Collection

Acrocanthosaurus dinosaur model – Carnegie Collection

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

So why the interest in this dinosaur model, one that was officially retired five years ago?  With the demise of the entire Carnegie Collection model series, team members at Everything Dinosaur know that many collectors and dinosaur model fans are eager to get their hands on this replica so that they can complete their Carnegie collections.  Everything Dinosaur has been able to acquire a number of these dinosaur models and we are selling them at the same price they were back in 2010 just £4.99 plus postage.  After all, why should we exploit a situation just because a dinosaur model is getting rarer and rarer.

To view the range of Safari Ltd dinosaur models available from Everything Dinosaur: Safari Ltd Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals

So for all those dinosaur fans and model collectors, he is one last opportunity to acquire what is becoming an increasingly rare dinosaur – the Acrocanthosaurus dinosaur model – Carnegie Collection.

The Dinosaur Timeline Poster

Dinosaur Timeline Poster

Many dinosaur fans may be familiar with the phrase the Age of Dinosaurs.  This term represents the time when the Dinosauria were the dominant terrestrial life forms on our planet.  This informal measurement of deep time actually covers three geological periods, the Triassic, the Jurassic and the Cretaceous.  The first dinosaurs and the Pterosauria (flying reptiles), evolved in the Middle Triassic, although this is only an approximation as the evolutionary history of the Dinosauria and Pterosauria remains controversial due to the paucity of the fossil record.  Both these types of vertebrate reptiles rapidly diversified and for the next one hundred and sixty million years these types of creatures dominated the land and the air respectively.  For the Pterosaurs, the evolution of the birds (descended from Theropod dinosaurs), led to them being challenged for aerial dominance and as a group, the flying reptiles began to decline in terms of the number of genera and species towards the end of the Cretaceous.  Both the Pterosaurs and the Dinosauria went extinct at the end of the Cretaceous.

This super, beautifully illustrated A2-sized poster shows how the world changed over the time of the “Age of Dinosaurs”.  Three scenes are presented, one for each of the geological periods and dates for the length of these immensely long geological periods are provided.

A Fantastic Dinosaur Timeline Poster

The excellent Dinosaur Timeline Poster

The excellent Dinosaur Timeline Poster

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Each prehistoric scene depicts the flora and fauna associated with that particular time period.  It provides an excellent, visual guide to the changes to life on Earth during the time of the dinosaurs.  There are a total of thirty prehistoric animals illustrated and the poster provides a stunning depiction of prehistoric life.  The dinosaur timeline poster has a key to help viewers to identify the animals and the dioramas really help young minds to understand the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods and the types of animals and plants that flourished.

To see the range of educational prehistoric animal posters available from Everything Dinosaur: Dinosaur Posters for Kids

This colourful dinosaur timeline poster measures 42cm by 59.4cm and it is a really well thought out dinosaur and prehistoric animal poster.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur stated:

“We have searched for quite a while to find a colourful, accurate and educational dinosaur timeline poster and we are delighted with this item.  Retailing for under £2.50 GBP [2015] plus post and packaging, this poster represents fantastic value.  We highly recommend it for use in schools, for use by home educationalists and for the bedroom walls of young dinosaur fans.”

A Close up of the Jurassic Scene from the Dinosaur Timeline Poster

Beautifully illustrated and educational

Beautifully illustrated and educational.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The Rebor Replica Utahraptor (Assembly Instructions)

Rebor 1:35 Scale Replica of Utahraptor (Wind Hunter)

The new Rebor 1:35 scale replica of Utahraptor (U. ostrommaysorum) has an articulated jaw and moveable, feathered arms.  It really is a most beautiful model.  However, a little bit of assembly is required, here is Everything Dinosaur’s quick guide to assembling your Utahraptor.

The Rebor 1:35 Scale Utahraptor Replica (Wind Hunter)

Depicting an agile, active dinosaur.

Depicting an agile, active dinosaur.

This model is packed into a sturdy padded box (plenty of foam for protection).  Carefully, unpack your parcel’s contents and locate the base.  You should have a small plastic bag stored in a separate foam compartment that contains the two detachable arms and that all important pin to secure the model to its base.

The Rebor Replica Utahraptor “Wings” and the Securing Pin

Check that you have a pin in with the detachable arms.

Check that you have a pin in with the detachable arms.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Carefully, secure the arms in place, you can leave them as moveable arms or if you are happy with a particular pose, you can glue the arms in place  if you want to.  Perhaps, professional model makers could use a little filler and re-touching paint to completely obliterate any sign of an articulation/join.

Carefully Push the Arms into Their Respective Sockets

Carefully attach the arms.

Carefully attach the arms.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Then it might be a good idea to remove the clear, plastic band that secured the articulated jaw in place before placing your model into position on its base.  Put the pin into the hole, look for the footprint mark if you struggle to spot it, (a hole is already made for the pin in the base).  Then carefully lower the hind foot onto the pin.  The hind foot has a hole in it and it is this that allows the model to be posed in such a dynamic one-footed stance.

Securing the Replica onto the Base

Pinning a Rebor Utahraptor in place.

Pinning a Rebor Utahraptor in place.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Really that’s all there is to it, time to relax and enjoy your 1:35 scale Rebor Utahraptor replica, the fearsome “Wind Hunter”.

To view the range of Rebor replicas available at Everything Dinosaur: Rebor Prehistoric Animal Replicas

A Review of the Schleich Anhanguera Replica

Everything Dinosaur Reviews the Schleich Anhanguera Pterosaur Model

This is a review of the new Schleich Anhanguera Pterosaur model and what a wonderful flying reptile model it is too.

Anhanguera is a member of the Ornithocheiridae family of Pterosaurs, a group of flying reptiles that seem particularly well-adapted to long-distance soaring.  Most of the fossils of ornithocheirids are associated with marine environments and their fossils have been found on every continent with the exception of Antarctica.

New For 2015 The Schleich Anhanguera Pterosaur Model

The colourful Schleich Anhanguera Pterosaur model.

The colourful Schleich Anhanguera Pterosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Anhanguera is very typical of the family and a number of species are known.  The most complete Anhanguera fossils have been found in Brazil in the famous Santana Formation of Lower Cretaceous strata.   Although, fragmentary flying reptiles ascribed to Anhanguera have also been found in England.

The English fossil material comes mostly from the Cambridge Greensand Formation, and consists of just scraps, very worn segments, usually more robust parts of the skeleton such as the jaw tips.  These are the fossilised remains of Pterosaurs that died far out to sea.  Skeletons were broken up by scavengers and wave action before coming to rest on the seabed, to get further scavenged and disassociated.  These remains were gradually buried and preserved as fossils only for them to be eroded out of these rocks by ancient storms and re-deposited in what are much younger sedimentary rocks.

It is thanks to the Brazilian fossil material that we have such a good understanding of Anhanguera and this Schleich replica does rather a good job of depicting what this flying reptile probably looked like.

The head and the jaws are very large and the forelimbs are proportionately much bigger and more robust than the hind limbs.  The neck is thick, indicating that this a strong and muscular part of the body and evidence of a tufty, hair-like integumental covering of pycnofibres, the fuzzy coat of the Pterosauria, has been skilfully recreated in the model.

The wings are very stiff and help the Schleich Anhanguera to stand in what is probably not a very realistic pose, the hands were in all likelihood rested on the ground with the wing finger elevated, not pointed down, but this posture is a compromise between allowing the model to stand unaided and a flying position.

To view Everything Dinosaur’s World of History (Schleich) model range: Schleich World of History Models

The elongated fourth wing finger tended to support a much bigger portion of the actual wing, about 60% of the entire wing length.  The wings of Anhanguera were longer than seen in this replica and they were more elegant.  Wingspans of around four to five metres are associated with the larger species in the Anhanguera genus.  This was a wonderfully efficient long distance flyer, soaring on thermal currents that carried it effortlessly over the early Atlantic Ocean.  Think of Anhanguera as a Early Cretaceous equivalent of today’s Albatross or Frigate Bird.

The design team at Schleich have done a particularly good job with the skull and jaws.  It is very well painted and you have those two crests on the jaw tips, one on the upper jaw and a slightly smaller one on the bottom jaw.  It is the size and shape of the crests that help scientists to determine different types of Ornithocheirid.  We are really impressed with the modelling and painting around the eyes and the nostrils are well defined as well as being clearly visible.

The Beautiful Schleich Anhanguera Replica

The "Toothy Grin" of a Pterosaur!

The “Toothy Grin” of a Pterosaur!

How Anhanguera fed nobody knows. Perhaps it was a skim feeder, flying along with its beak in the water to catch fish at the surface, with those crests on the jaws helping acting as stabilisers.  Maybe it floated and seized fish swimming just below the surface, or perhaps it plunged into the water and pursued fish in a way similar to today’s Gannets and Shearwaters, no one really knows, what is certain, is that this is an excellent Pterosaur replica and a welcome addition to the Schleich model range.

Staypressed theme by Themocracy