All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Everything Dinosaur Products

Everything Dinosaur’s product news.

20 12, 2016

Jurassic Park III Model Diorama Takes Shape

By | December 20th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page|0 Comments

Working on a Prehistoric Landscape (Jurassic Park III)

Talented model maker and prehistoric animal model fan, Robert Townsend has embarked on an ambitious project to build a large prehistoric diorama, a project he has named “Jurassic Park III”.  Team members at Everything Dinosaur have been lucky enough to have received regular updates as the model begins to take shape.  The baseboard is made from a two-metre-long door blank, as with all projects such as this, a lot of planning and preparation has been undertaken before the construction phase can begin.

The Baseboard Accurately Marked Out

Dinosaur diorama building phase 1.

The dinosaur diorama base with the grid carefully inked in.

Picture Credit: Robert Townsend

Once Robert had finalised his design plans it was time to mark out the baseboard using an accurate scale so that the model can commence its transformation from the drawing board to three-dimensional reality.  The base was accurately marked out using a pen and a ruler into six inch squares.  This would enable the shapes of land formations and other features to be plotted onto the base.  Using this grid as a guide, Robert was then able to pencil in the various contours and features that he wanted.  A ruler was used for straight lines and a bendy plastic guide for curved areas.  Time and care taken at this stage would ensure that the finished landscape would look realistic.

Cladding the Prehistoric Landscape in Newspaper

Prehistoric landscape feature building.

Building up the features on the prehistoric landscape.

Picture Credit: Robert Townsend

After the model maker had built up a large collection of sturdy cardboard, landscape construction was begun.  The background and rear areas are normally the highest land formations, so these were built first, enabling the diorama to have an obvious “rear” and “front” to it.  Working to the nearest 1/16 of an inch, each piece of cardboard was measured accurately and then carefully glued into position.  When viewed from underneath, Robert describes these sections as “looking like giant, odd-shaped Lego bricks.”

The left-hand edge of the Jurassic Park III landscape has been made to exactly match the right-hand edge of Robert’s earlier, large-scale dinosaur diorama.  This will enable him to display them both together, should the need arise.  The entire model was then clad in layers of newspaper to help define the landscape features and in preparation for painting.  Extra strength wallpaper paste was used to ensure all the paper stays in place.

Waterhole Centrepiece

The central feature of the prehistoric landscape will be a substantial waterhole, a place for the various prehistoric animals that will feature in the diorama, to drink.

Robert explained:

“My original design was to have just a small ‘duck pond’ type feature with some small water plants growing around its’ edges, but when I saw the size of the three palm tree figures and the 12-inch Cycad tree model made by CollectA, (which I recently bought from Everything Dinosaur), it was obvious that this was far too small a feature with not enough shoreline for lots of exotic plants and drinking animals.  So, I re-drew it about four times larger and this was definitely the right thing to do.  It will dominate the entire middle third of the diorama, as I think it should.”

The Landscape Clad in Newspaper

A dinosaur landscape being prepared for painting.

The cardboard is covered in paper ready for painting.

Picture Credit: Robert Townsend

The Model Water Feature

The waterhole will make a natural centrepiece to the diorama and it will represent the lowest lying area of the landscape.  Producing a realistic water effect can be difficult, but a trip to a railway modelling shop enabled resourceful Mr Townsend to acquire a small jar of “model water feature”.  He has not used this substance before and care needs to be taken when brushing this material on, but there is still a lot to do before the water feature can be brought to life.

Applying the Undercoat to the Prehistoric Landscape

Undercoat painting on the prehistoric landscape.

Painting the undercoat on the dinosaur diorama.

Picture Credit: Robert Townsend

Applying the Undercoat

The entire surface, excluding the central waterhole feature was painted with a pale grey masonry paint.  Two undercoats of this water-based emulsion were applied. The aim was to smooth out and cover wrinkles, creases and imperfections in the newspaper cladding.  This renders the entire surface smooth and creates a solid looking piece of landscape.  Having two coats of paint, (and in some places three), makes for great strength and long lasting surfaces.  After a good 24-hours to allow the undercoating to dry fully, all the vertical rock faces were painted with a second coat of masonry paint, only this time, a brownish-clay colour was selected.   Robert recommends allowing at least a day to let the paint dry completely.

Painting the Edges of the Prehistoric Landscape

Painting the sides of the prehistoric landscape.

Painting the black edging along the sides of the model.

Picture Credit: Robert Townsend

The next stage saw the upper surfaces painted with a sandstone colour and a couple of coats of a matt black paint was applied to the edges of the model to provide a professional looking finish to the sides of the landscape. In the picture above, the landscape with its central water feature can be seen to be really coming together.  All Robert’s careful planning and preparation is beginning to pay off.  Robert has promised to send us more photographs and updates on his dinosaur themed diorama.  We look forward to seeing how this prehistoric scene looks when it is finished.

Robert enjoys creating prehistoric themed dioramas that show dinosaurs and other extinct creatures that lived during specific periods of the Mesozoic.  Everything Dinosaur blog readers can view several of Robert’s prehistoric scenes:

Giants of South America

The Jurassic of Europe

A Late Cretaceous Dinosaur Diorama

16 12, 2016

Updating the Deinocheirus Fact Sheet

By | December 16th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Deinocheirus Fact Sheet is Updated

One of the wonderful things about vertebrate palaeontology is that ideas about prehistoric animals are changing all the time.  Fossil discoveries and new research often challenges existing assumptions leading to a revision of data.  Model making companies often reflect the changing views about a long extinct animal by introducing a new version of that animal to their prehistoric animal model portfolio.  CollectA for example, recently introduced a new model of the bizarre Late Cretaceous Theropod Deinocheirus (D. mirificus).  In addition, CollectA will be bringing out a new Deluxe version of Deinocheirus in 2017.  This means, that for Everything Dinosaur team members, there is a need to update and revise the company’s Deinocheirus fact sheet.

The New Scale Drawing of Deinocheirus from Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus mirificus scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Deinocheirus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus – Taller than a Lamppost!

Thanks to two new fossil discoveries (a sub-adult found in 2006 and the fossils of a much larger individual discovered in 2009), palaeontologists have a much better idea about what this giant ornithomimid looked like.  As a result, further changes to the Everything Dinosaur fact sheet have been made.  In the original data sheet, prepared in 2012, prior to the scientific paper providing the new description, it was stated that the known fossils ascribed to Deinocheirus represented one of the largest Theropods from Asia.  This remains true, however, an assessment of the fossilised bones of the individual found in 2009, including a humerus six centimetres longer than the holotype, indicate that Deinocheirus reached a length of around eleven metres.  Subsequent study of the strongly reinforced pelvis and the robust hind limbs have led palaeontologists to reconsider how heavy this animal might have been.  It probably had a narrower stance than the pot-bellied Therizinosaurs, but scientists estimate that Deinocheirus might have weighed as much as six tonnes and it would have stood around five metres tall.

The New for 2017 CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Deinocheirus Replica

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus model.

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We look forward to the arrival of the new CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Deinocheirus replica and the other exciting new models to be added to CollectA’s “Prehistoric Life” model range.

To read more about the new CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus: New CollectA Models for 2017 (part 2)

6 12, 2016

Rebor 1:1 Scale Lourinhanosaurus Embryonic Skeleton Reviewed

By | December 6th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Embryonic Skeleton

The latest edition to the Rebor “Club Selection” range is this wonderful Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton replica.   Those clever people at Rebor have got together with the EoFauna Scientific Research Group and created a 1:1 scale replica of a Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton.  This model has been affectionately nick-named “Bony Bonnie” and with only 1,000 figures made, it is certainly going to have rarity value.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Embryonic Skeleton Replica

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica.

The 1:1 scale Rebor Club Selection limited edition Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Based on Actual Fossil Material

The large meat-eating dinosaur known as Lourinhanosaurus has been described from a single, partial skeleton and other fragmentary fossils including a thigh bone, all from the Upper Jurassic strata of the Lourinhã Formation on the western coast of Portugal.  The holotype material (the fossils upon which the genus description is based), consists of vertebrae, a few ribs, bones from the hips and some leg bones including a single pes (toe bone).  The first fossils of Lourinhanosaurus were found by a local farmer in 1982, it was not until 1998 that this dinosaur was formally scientifically named and described.  The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi 1:1 scale replica is based on actual fossil material (specimen number ML 565).  Back in 1993, a scientist found the remains of over one hundred dinosaur eggs, some of which contained complete fossilised embryos.  These egg fossils were assigned to L. antunesi.  The scientist who discovered the egg fossils was Isabel Mateus, the mother of the Portuguese palaeontologist Octávio Mateus who was responsible for the scientific description of this Theropod.

A Close-up View of the Beautiful Skull of the Rebor Lourinhanosaurus Replica

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica, close up of the head.

The 1:1 scale Rebor Club Selection limited edition Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton model. A close-up of the head.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the range of Rebor replicas available at Everything Dinosaur, including the limited edition (only 1,000 made), Rebor 1:1 scale Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton: Rebor Prehistoric Animal Models and Replicas

Rebor’s “Bony Bonnie”

This is the fourth model to be added to the Rebor Club Selection range and like the previous three, “Bony Bonnie” has been skilfully crafted and shows lots of amazing detail.  There is much to be admired in the skeleton model, which is a fraction under nineteen centimetres in length.  Naturally, once hatched the baby Lourinhanosaurus would have been much longer and if it made adulthood it would have grown into a formidable predator, perhaps exceeding eight metres in length and weighing as much as a Jaguar E-type sports car.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Embryonic Skeleton Model

"Bony Bonnie" from Rebor.

The Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus replica.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A Close-up View of the Egg

Much has been said about the skeleton model, it really is a fantastic piece, but at Everything Dinosaur we would like to conclude by focusing on the broken egg element of the replica that forms the stand for the skeleton.   Lots of detail is shown on the broken egg component of the replica with the typical pits and marks associated with dinosaur egg shell.

The Broken Egg Stand for the Lourinhanosaurus Embryonic Skeleton

Rebor Club Selection Lourinhanosaurus egg.

The broken egg stand for the Rebor Club Selection limited edition Lourinhanosaurus antunesi embryonic skeleton.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Rebor in conjunction with the EoFauna Scientific Research Group must have studied dinosaur eggshell fossils before embarking on this sculpt.  The eggshell is very robust and sturdy and makes an extremely effective stand complimenting the skeleton element of the model.  The name plate on the piece gives the impression of brass and the scientific name has even been inscribed in an italic font, as per scientific convention.

Our congratulations to Rebor and EoFauna Scientific Research Group for this super new addition to the Rebor Club Selection model range.

25 11, 2016

New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 4 of 4)

By | November 25th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|6 Comments

New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 4 of 4)

Today, we reveal the last group of CollectA prehistoric animal models scheduled for release in 2017 and what an amazing group they are.  CollectA intend to introduce a Dimorphodon pterosaur model with an articulated jaw, a Deluxe Uintatherium, a giant prehistoric mammal of the Eocene Epoch.  Last but not least, CollectA are bringing out a box of mini prehistoric animal models, a wonderful set that features small replicas which we know will prove to be very popular with makers of prehistoric scenes and dioramas.

New for 2017 The CollectA Dimorphodon Model

CollectA Dimorphodon pterosaur model.

The CollectA Dimorphodon model with a movable lower jaw.

Picture Credit: CollectA

Flying into view or should that be walking into view, comes this beautiful replica of the Early Jurassic pterosaur Dimorphodon.  This flying reptile figure is depicted in terrestrial mode, after all, these creatures did come down from the skies and in the case of Dimorphodon, it probably spent much of its time either on the ground or climbing around in trees.  It is great to see a replica of this British pterosaur (not forgetting the possible second species from Mexico D. weintraubi), especially one that is shown in a quadrupedal stance, perhaps in recognition of the amount of research undertaken into pterosaur posture using Dimorphodon fossil material.

CollectA Dimorphodon Model Measurements

The official measurements for the Dimorphodon are length 37.5 centimetres and height (wing tips) just under 12.5 centimetres.  This model has been referred to as part of the “Supreme” range of models, but in other documents received from CollectA it is described as “Deluxe”.  Whatever range it is in, the CollectA Dimorphodon is certainly a wonderful figure, and like the CollectA Supreme Guidraco pterosaur and the new for 2017, CollectA Deluxe Kronosaurus, it has an articulated jaw.

Additional note:  We can now confirm that the Dimorphodon replica is part of the CollectA Supreme range.

The CollectA Deluxe Uintatherium

CollectA has already introduced an array of top quality prehistoric mammals into their Deluxe scale model range and this new for 2017 Uintatherium (pronounced “You-inn-tah-fear-ree-um”), continues this trend.

The CollectA Deluxe Uintatherium Model

CollectA Deluxe Uintatherium model.

The CollectA Uintatherium model.

Picture Credit: CollectA

The model depicts a powerful animal with an amazing skull.  The detail in the mouth is fantastic, especially those awesome upper canine teeth, which were bigger in the males.  These teeth may have been used to defend this rhino-sized beast from predators or perhaps they were used in intraspecific combat.  The CollectA Uintatherium has been given a short coat of fur and the talented designer behind the CollectA prehistoric animal model range, Anthony Beeson explained:

“I chose Uintatherium, which, for an amazing animal, I think has been strangely neglected by toy makers in recent decades.  I decided to give it hair as I have never really liked the hippo style appearance for many reconstructions.”

CollectA Deluxe Uintatherium Model Measurements

The information we have indicates a total length of 17 centimetres, with the height of the model around 9 centimetres.  It makes a fine companion piece to display alongside the CollectA Daeodon and the CollectA Andrewsarchus figure, which was introduced earlier this year.

The CollectA Mini Prehistoric Animal Set

Concluding the new for 2017 prehistoric animal models from CollectA is this wonderful set of twelve mini prehistoric animals representing a wide range of creatures from the Palaeozoic and the Mesozoic.  These beautifully crafted models are going to prove to be really useful for model makers and creators of prehistoric animal dioramas, just to add those finishing touches to make a prehistoric scene look authentic and to add extra detail.

The CollectA Mini Prehistoric Animal Set

CollectA mini prehistoric animal models.

The CollectA mini prehistoric animals set.

Picture Credit: CollectA

 The twelve figures, which are all marine animals, are comprised of three reptiles (Pliosaurus, Temnodontosaurus and the giant sea turtle Archelon), three fish (Leedsichthys, Dunkleosteus and the fearsome Xiphactinus) and six invertebrates.

Commenting on this model set, Anthony Beeson stated:

“These are of course, not to scale but can be used in play and dioramas along with our other models as immature animals where we have already produced models of the same species.  The new models include the giant ammonite Parapuzosia and the little trilobite Olenoides serratus and other prehistoric fish and cephalopods that I thought might be enjoyable and educational.  I always particularly liked the elegantly uncurled Australiceras after coming across fossils at Dinosaur Isle museum on the Isle of Wight.”

This is a fantastic set of prehistoric animal models and from our perspective it is great to see the likes of the Late Cretaceous straight-shelled ammonite Baculites and a replica of the giant Cameroceras, often cited as our planet’s first, monstrous super-predator, included.

As to the size of these models, they do vary, with the largest models being just under five centimetres in length.

When Will These Three New Items Be Available?

We are expecting our first stock of the Dimorphodon, Uintatherium and the set of prehistoric animals sometime around the middle of next year.

To view the CollectA Prehistoric Life including 2016 models: CollectA Prehistoric Life Collection

To view the CollectA Deluxe model range: CollectA Deluxe Scale Models

23 11, 2016

Xenoceratops

By | November 23rd, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Six-Metre-Long “Alien Horned Face”

Xenoceratops foremostensis is a surprise omission from “The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs” (second edition), a new dinosaur book that an Everything Dinosaur team member is writing a review about*. With all the amazing new, North American ceratopsid discoveries over the last decade or so we thought that “alien horned face” would be featured.  Perhaps it is, but so far, we have not been able to find it, in what is a very well-presented and beautifully illustrated guide to the Dinosauria.

A Scale Drawing of the Horned Dinosaur Xenoceratops

Xenoceratops scale drawing.

A scale drawing of the horned dinosaur Xenoceratops.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Fragmentary skull pieces were collected by Dr Wann Langston from the uppermost layers of the Foremost Formation (south-western Alberta, Canada) in 1958.  Dinosaur fossils are exceptionally rare in this strata and what fossils have been found are highly fragmentary or represent individual, shed teeth.  To understand why, you have to consider how the majority of the rocks that make up this Upper Cretaceous sequence, which is regarded as a basal component of the Judith River Group, were laid down in the first place.

The sandstones, mudstones and shales that make up the majority of the strata (there are coal seams too), consist of sediments that were eroded from the mountain range on the west of the landmass of Laramidia.  Rivers transported these sediments travelling eastwards before eventually dumping much of their load as the water courses slowed on a large floodplain prior to an estuarine habitat that led out onto the Western Interior Seaway.  The fossils ascribed to Xenoceratops were found in a small band of rock which represented a riverine deposition area close to the shoreline.  These unimpressive, scrappy remains were put into storage and not examined again until 2003.

We have palaeontologists Dr Michael Ryan, Dr David Evans and Kieran Shepherd, the curator of palaeobiology at the Canadian Museum of Nature, to thank for the scientific description of this Centrosaurine, one of the oldest (if not the oldest), horned dinosaurs known from Canada.  A thorough examination of the fossil material was begun in 2009 with Dr Evans locating further fossil material to be used in the study.  This led to the naming of Xenoceratops (Xenoceratops foremostensis) in 2012.

CollectA Added a Xenoceratops Replica to the “Prehistoric Life” Model Range in 2014

CollectA Xenoceratops model.

The dinosaur with “alien” headgear, but that’s now how this dinosaur got its name.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the CollectA Xenoceratops dinosaur model and the rest of the models that make up the wonderful CollectA “Prehistoric Life” model collection: CollectA Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animal Models

Xenoceratops foremostensis

Contrary to popular belief, this dinosaur was not named “alien horned face” because of its bizarre headshield ornamentation and its huge nasal horn.  It was the first Ceratopsian to be described from the Foremost Formation and as it was a rarity, it was regarded as “alien” to the strata of south-western Alberta.

The Fragmentary Skull Fossils of Xenoceratops

Xenoceratops skull fossils.

Piecing together skull material.

Picture Credit: Canadian Museum of Natural History

* To read Everything Dinosaur’s review of “The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs”: “The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs” Reviewed

18 11, 2016

New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 3)

By | November 18th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|1 Comment

CollectA Excalibosaurus and Basilosaurus

Today we reveal the next two new for 2017 prehistoric animal models to be introduced by CollectA, both are marine creatures, and predators but they are separated by some 150 million years of our planet’s history.  First up is the splendid Excalibosaurus, a wonderful replica of this Early Jurassic member of the Order Ichthyosauria.  This marine reptile had an elongated rostrum, its upper jaw was much longer than its lower jaw.  Palaeontologists have suggested that it used its bizarre jaws to slash at shoals of fish, the stunned and wounded fish would have then been easier to catch.

New for 2017 the CollectA Excalibosaurus Model

CollectA Excalibosaurus.

The CollectA Excalibosaurus model.

Picture Credit: CollectA

Known from two specimens, both found in Lower Jurassic strata exposed on the Somerset coast of England, this rare Ichthyosaur would have been an apex predator some 190 million years ago.  The holotype material is in the vertebrate collection of the Bristol Museum (England), whilst a much larger and more complete specimen is housed at the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto, Canada).

Each prehistoric sculpture is approved by Anthony Beeson, a highly-respected expert in palaeoimagery and Anthony commented:

“Excalibosaurus is a local Somerset favourite of mine.  As the holotype is in Bristol Museum and is local to me, I have been able to spend some time studying it.  I think that both the name with its allusions to King Arthur’s magic sword and the animal’s own unusual swordfish-like upper jaw, make it a fascinating Ichthyosaur and one that is not well known amongst children.  It is certainly one of Bristol Museum’s star attractions.”

The colouration of this model reflects some of the latest research into the skin colour of marine reptiles and the new Excalibosaurus compliments the wide range of marine reptile models that have already been introduced by CollectA into their “Prehistoric Life” collection.

CollectA Excalibosaurus Measurements

The official measurements for this new for 2017 marine reptile model are: length just under 13 cm and a height (top of the dorsal fin) of just over 3 cm.

CollectA Basilosaurus Model

The second model to be announced this week is a fantastic replica of the early toothed whale Basilosaurus and what an amazing model it is.

New for 2017 the CollectA Basilosaurus Model

An early whale model - CollectA Basilosaurus

The CollectA Basilosaurus model.

Picture Credit: CollectA

We know that prehistoric animal model collectors and fans of the CollectA range have long been after such a replica and CollectA have certainly delivered with this carefully crafted figure.

Anthony explained:

“Basilosaurus is another animal that I have been intending to produce for some time.  Basilosaurus was a strange colossal early whale, with its vestigial back legs and evolving front flippers.  The colour scheme again veers away from the ubiquitous black and white of many reconstructions and towards the colouring of sperm whales, dolphins and dugongs.”

The colouration is fascinating, at the time Basilosaurus roamed the oceans (Eocene Epoch) a number of other mammal groups had taken to a marine existence, for example, the first sea cows, had evolved.  The grey patches in the picture seen behind the head and along the back are patches of barnacles.  Scientists have concluded that Basilosaurus was not capable of diving to great depths and spent most of its life swimming near to the sea surface (the Epipelagic Zone).  As this part of the sea is inhabited by barnacles it seemed logical for CollectA to give their model a few patches of barnacle infestation.

A Closer View of the Head Shows the Barnacle Patches Behind the Skull

The CollectA Basilosaurus model.

The Basilosaurus early whale model by CollectA.

Picture Credit: CollectA

The picture above shows a close up of the head of the model, several patches of barnacles can be seen on the figure.

CollectA Basilosaurus Measurements

The model measures over 35 cm long and it is approximately 3 cm high.  The very large size of a fully grown Basilosaurus has meant that, for practical reasons, CollectA were unable to make this figure to the same scale as the terrestrial models in their range.  The model is described by CollectA as “extra-large”, since it is longer than the CollectA Deluxe Feathered T. rex, this description does not do this fantastic figure justice.  As for a scale, we estimate that a male of the species could reach a length of around 18 metres, this would make the CollectA Basilosaurus to be around the 1:50 scale mark.

As for when these models will be available, we are expecting our first stock of the Excalibosaurus sometime around the end of February, or perhaps the first week of March.  The Basilosaurus replica is due out sometime in the middle of 2017, perhaps as early as June or July.

To view the CollectA Prehistoric Life range including 2016 models: CollectA Prehistoric Life Collection

To view the CollectA Deluxe model range: CollectA Deluxe Scale Models

17 11, 2016

A Video Review of the Paleo-Creatures Concavenator Replica

By | November 17th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Product Reviews|0 Comments

The Paleo-Creatures Concavenator Model Reviewed

It’s fascinating to see the interpretation of an unusual dinosaur by a talented model maker, especially a dinosaur which is synonymous with the country in which that model maker resides. That is exactly what has happened with the excellent Concavenator corcovatus designed by Jesús Toledo as part of his Paleo-Creatures prehistoric animal model series.  In this short video (just under three minutes and twenty seconds duration), the artist talks us through the inspiration behind his choice of colour scheme and provides some further information about this enigmatic Spanish dinosaur that was formally named and described just six years ago.

The Video Review of the Concavenator Replica

Video Credit: Paleo-Creatures

Concavenator corcovatus by Paleo-Creatures

Although known from just one specimen found in the Iberian Mountains of Cuenca Province, (Spain), the fossils attributed to this genus represent one of the most complete Theropod skeletons ever found in Europe.  The excellent state of preservation and the articulation of the fossils suggests that the carcase of this meat-eater was washed into a lake not long after the animal died.  Once in the lake, the corpse was rapidly buried by other sediment and these conditions permitted much of the animal’s remains to be preserved.  At around six metres in length, Concavenator would have been a formidable predator, in the video sculptor Jesús explains that he wanted to give the impression of a swift and dangerous hunter, hence the quite dynamic pose.

The Paleo-Creatures Concavenator Replica by Jesús Toledo

Paleo-Creatures Concavenator

The Paleo-Creatures Concavenator model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Concavenator has been given a set of “tiger stripes”.  Obviously, the colouration of prehistoric animal models is a speculative business but it is not hard to imagine a Concavenator using tree cover and brush to sneak up onto a herd of unsuspecting iguanodonts.  In a forest environment, such camouflage would have been very effective.  In addition, the detail on the head is nicely done and all the teeth on our hand-painted models have been painted with great care.

Quill Knobs

The ulna (one of the bones in the forearm), of Concavenator shows evidence of what may have been the connection points for a series of quills or quill knobs.  In accordance with this, the artist has added some small feathery ornamentation to the forelimb.  The video gives the viewer the opportunity to view the limbs and to see the feathers.  That distinctive hump is well-crafted too.  Quite why the eleventh and twelfth vertebrae were twice the size of the other back bones remains a mystery.  The Paleo-Creatures Concavenator replica certainly shows off this dinosaur’s hump, given that this Theropod also possessed cranial crests (also depicted in the model), it has been suggested that the hump may have played a role in visual communication, perhaps to win a mate or to deter rivals.  Other palaeontologists have suggested that the hump may have evolved to assist with thermoregulation.

The Paleo-Creatures Concavenator is described as being in approximately 1:32 scale, it forms part of a hand-crafted and hand-painted prehistoric animal model range created by Spanish artist Jesús Toledo.

To see the Paleo-Creatures Concavenator and the rest of the Paleo-Creatures model range currently available from Everything Dinosaur: The Paleo-Creatures Model Range

To read Everything Dinosaur’s 2010 article about the discovery of Concavenator: A New Theropod Dinosaur from Spain. One Lump or Two?

15 11, 2016

A Video Review of the Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus

By | November 15th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Everything Dinosaur videos, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Product Reviews|0 Comments

Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus tanneri Video Review

One of the best reasons for making a replica of a dinosaur is because it happens to be one of your favourites.  That’s the reason given by talented Spanish artist Jesús Toledo for adding the gorgeous Torvosaurus tanneri model to the Paleo-Creatures range of prehistoric animals.  In this short video (2:37), Jesús explains a little about the two species in the Torvosaurus genus (T. tanneri from the United States and Torvosaurus gurneyi from Portugal).  In addition, he provides viewers with a close up look of this well-crafted figure.  The genus name means “Savage Lizard” and one glance at this Paleo-Creatures model convinces you that this Late Jurassic Theropod was a formidable predator.

The Paleo-Creatures Video Review of Torvosaurus tanneri

Video Credit: Paleo-Creatures

 Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus tanneri

For someone based in Spain, choosing the Torvosaurus species known from the Morrison formation of western North America might seem a little strange, especially when the European species is believed to have been larger and heavier.  Still, it is fascinating to consider where in the food chain Torvosaurus was and how it competed with the several other types of large, carnivorous dinosaur that shared its habitat.

When T. gurneyi was formally described in 2014, many media outlets described it as the largest carnivorous dinosaur from Europe known to science.  Theropod fossils from Europe tend to be fragmentary at best, however, based on an assessment of the upper jaw bone and a partial femur, this species of Torvosaurus from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal (Lourinhã Formation) may have grown to lengths in excess of ten metres.

A Scale Drawing of Torvosaurus gurneyi

Torvosaurus gurneyi scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Torvosaurus gurneyi.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In the video review, dinosaur model fans get the chance to view this Paleo-Creatures replica close up.  The proportions of the model have been carefully thought out and the articulated jaw is a nice touch.  The vivid colouration is very striking and it is worth remembering that every single Torvosaurus is hand-painted, it is a beautiful dinosaur figure.

The Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus Dinosaur Model

The Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus dinosaur model.

The Paleo-Creatures Torvosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Jesús Toledo has managed to produce a well-balanced figure, the feet are not too oversized and the replica is very stable on its sandy coloured base.  Getting large bipeds to stand in a realistic pose can be a headache for designers and sculptors, but Jesús has achieved an excellent result with his Torvosaurus.

To view the range of Paleo-Creatures figures, including the Torvosaurus available from Everything Dinosaur: The Paleo-Creatures Range at Everything Dinosaur

The Monster of Minden – Wiehenvenator albati

Fittingly, we wanted to conclude this article on the ferocious Torvosaurus tanneri by mentioning a recently described Theropod that might challenge T. gurneyi for the title of the biggest meat-eating dinosaur known from Europe.  A team of researchers writing in the journal “Palaeontologica Electronica” in August of this year (2016), have described the fragmentary bones of a super-sized carnivore, one that may have rivalled T. gurneyi in terms of size.  Nick-named the “Monster of Minden”, the scientists, which included Dr Oliver Rauhut, from the Bavarian Collection for Palaeontology and Geology, have named this dinosaur Wiehenvenator albati (the name means hunter from the Wiehen Hills).  Although size estimates do vary, Wiehenvenator has been estimated to have been about ten metres long.  It has been classified as a sister taxon to Torvosaurus, although it lived at least ten million years earlier.

To read an article about the discovery of Torvosaurus gurneyiEurope’s Largest Meat-Eating Dinosaur Described to Date

For further information about Wiehenvenator albatiThe “Monster of Minden”

11 11, 2016

New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 2)

By | November 11th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products, Press Releases|2 Comments

New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 2)

Time to reveal the next three models for 2017 to be introduced by CollectA.  Dinosaur and prehistoric animal model collectors and fans of all things prehistoric can expect a Deluxe 1:40 scale Deinocheirus, a new horned dinosaur figure – Regaliceratops and a Deluxe 1:40 scale Kronosaurus replica complete with articulated jaw.

In the first part of our series of articles introducing the new for 2017 CollectA prehistoric animal replicas, we hinted that there would be another horned dinosaur to come.  This time it would not be a member of the Centrosaurinae clade like Styracosaurus and Einiosaurus, so we are very pleased to introduce Regaliceratops.

New for 2017 the CollectA Regaliceratops Dinosaur Model

CollectA Prehistoric Life Regaliceratops model.

The CollectA Regaliceratops horned dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: CollectA/Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Regaliceratops

Named back in 2015, Regaliceratops (R. peterhewsi) rather upset the Ceratopsid apple cart as the skull showed Centrosaurine characteristics despite its classification as being a member of the Chasmosaurinae.  It is always good news when a relatively recently scientifically described dinosaur becomes a model and CollectA have done a great job depicting this stocky and statuesque herbivore.  The brightly coloured head shield and the body paint really make this particular dinosaur’s features stand out.

CollectA Regaliceratops Measurements

The official measurements we have for this new horned dinosaur model are as follows: length, a fraction under 12.5 cm long and height 5 cm approximately.

CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Kronosaurus (articulated jaw)

Swimming into view comes the first (hint) of the marine reptiles for 2017.  A magnificent Kronosaurus figure complete with an articulated lower jaw.

The CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Kronosaurus Model

The CollectA Kronosaurus replica with articulated lower jaw.

The CollectA Deluxe Kronosaurus model.

Picture Credit: CollectA/Everything Dinosaur

Fans of marine reptiles are likely to get quite excited about this short-necked member of the Plesiosauria, the model has been carefully thought out, taking into account some of the latest research into this formidable predator.  The deep body, large skull, the jaws with their heterogeneous teeth and some teeth very fang-like, long powerful flippers and that fluke on the end of the tail – all highly commendable.  Model collectors with long memories might remember a short-lived Schleich Saurus Kronosaurus figure that had similar colouration.  The Schleich Kronosaurus was around about a decade ago, in our view, this new CollectA offering is much the superior figure.

CollectA Deluxe Kronosaurus Swims into View

The CollectA Kronosaurus replica with articulated lower jaw.

The CollectA Deluxe Kronosaurus model.

Picture Credit: CollectA

CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Kronosaurus Measurements

This is quite a large model, it measures a total of 31 cm long, making the CollectA Kronosaurus about the same length as the CollectA Deluxe Pliosaurus that came out in 2015.  The height of the model (from the top of the skull) is estimated to be 6 cm.

CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Deinocheirus

Hot on the heels of the not-to-scale Deinocheirus figure that was released last year, comes this Deluxe model.  Our view of this giant ornithomimosaur has been revised over the last few years and the design team at CollectA have been quick to acknowledge these revisions and apply them to their model range.

New for 2017 A CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus model.

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: CollectA/Everything Dinosaur

The colour scheme chosen for this new figure is almost identical to the smaller model introduced last year.  However, the stance is slightly different and the tail in the larger, Deluxe version is not raised as high.  The head of the CollectA Deluxe model is also turned a little and not facing forwards. One thing that it does have in common with the popular Prehistoric Life model is that the tongue can be seen in both figures.  Palaeontologists have speculated that the deep lower jaw may suggest that this strange dinosaur had an over-sized tongue!

A Comparison between the two CollectA Figures Showing the Latest Interpretation of Deinocheirus

CollectA Deinocheirus models compared.

A comparison between the not to scale CollectA Deinocheirus model of 2016 with the new for 2017 Deluxe Deinocheirus figure.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus Measurements

The official measurements we have for the CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus are: length 28.5 cm approximately and the model stands some 15 cm high.

As for when these models will be available, we are expecting our first stock of these three new models sometime around the end of February, or perhaps the first week of March or thereabouts.

To view the CollectA Prehistoric Life including 2016 models: CollectA Prehistoric Life Collection

To view the CollectA Deluxe model range: CollectA Deluxe Scale Models

To read an article about the discovery of Regaliceratops: Regaliceratops – A Right Royal Rumble

For an article that discusses the revision of Deinocheirus (D. mirificus): Deinocheirus – Done and Dusted (for now at least)

Look out for more information on new prehistoric animal models from CollectA next week.

6 11, 2016

Archaeopteryx and Compsognathus on Display

By | November 6th, 2016|Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Naturmuseum Senckenberg Archaeopteryx and Compsognathus

With the wonderful Rebor Compsognathus replica back in stock (Sentry), it is worthwhile reflecting on the amazing Solnhofen exhibit in the vertebrates’ gallery at the Naturmuseum Senckenberg (Frankfurt).  The famous, finely grained Upper Jurassic Solnhofen and Holzmaden deposits are not too far from the Frankfurt museum, so a number of fossil specimens including pterosaurs, marine reptiles and dinosaurs are represented within that part of the collection on view to the public.

Compsognathus and Archaeopteryx on Display at the Museum

Archaeopteryx and Compsognathus on display.

An exhibit showing the similarities between Archaeopteryx and Compsognathus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In the brightly lit Compsognathus and Archaeopteryx exhibit, these two Late Jurassic animals are compared side by side.  There is a focus on the delicate jaws of Compsognathus (the genus name means “elegant jaw”), whilst the Archaeopteryx section looks at the adaptations within the skeleton for flight.  The informative display boards are in English as well as German, very helpful for visitors and this display forms part of a larger exhibit that looks at the relationship between small, cursorial Theropod dinosaurs and the evolution of the Aves (birds).  The bones within the display itself are casts of the actual fossils but great care has been taken to light the exhibit so the minute details, even traces of feathers on the Archaeopteryx specimens, can be made out.

The Rebor Sentry (Compsognathus longipes)

The Rebor replica Sentry (Compsognathus).

Rebor Compsognathus – Sentry

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view the Rebor range of prehistoric animal models including the amazing Compsognathus scale model: Rebor replicas including the 1:6 scale Compsognathus replica “Sentry”

The Rebor Sentry is a fantastic museum quality model of this lithe and agile dinosaur.  The Rebor 1:6 scale replica comes with a model of a Jurassic dragonfly (Protolindenia).  It is thought that Compsognathus chased insects and other small animals in the undergrowth.  Catching a dragonfly would have been a challenge for this little dinosaur (the largest specimen indicates a total body length of around 120 centimetres).  However, the effort would have been well worth it as a dragonfly would have made a sizeable meal for this tiny Theropod.

The craftsmanship on the Rebor Sentry is exquisite.  For example, this replica even has an articulated lower jaw.

Archaeopteryx and Compsognathus Models

Several mainstream model manufacturers have added an Archaeopteryx figure to their ranges.  This is pleasing to see, as the “Urvogel” is an iconic animal representing a transitional form between a reptile and a true bird.  The term “Urvogel” is German and it means “first bird”.  Although Archaeopteryx was not the first bird to evolve, when its fossils came to prominence in the late 1850’s and early 1860’s, it did indeed represent the first major and widely studied fossils of a Jurassic member of the Aves, or at least an animal the represented a bridge between the Order Reptilia and the Aves.

At Everything Dinosaur, we are aware that a mainstream manufacturer intends to introduce another replica of Archaeopteryx in 2017, once we have permission to post up pictures on our social media pages we shall get them up.  As for Compsognathus replicas, these are few and far between, that long tail, small head, and those delicate limbs make sculpting replicas quite difficult, that’s why there is so much to be admired in the Rebor Sentry replica.

The 1:6 Scale Rebor Compsognathus Model (Sentry)

Rebor 1:6 scale Compsognathus model

The amazing Compsognathus model from Rebor available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Load More Posts