Category: Dinosaur Fans

Vote Dinosaur!

Which Political Dinosaur Will You Vote For?

Unless you have been buried under a geological formation for the last few months it probably hasn’t escaped your attention that on May 7th in the United Kingdom we are going to have a general election.  Today, April 1st means that there is just over five weeks remaining before the big vote.  Whilst we appreciate that such events are very important and we would not want to belittle the democratic process, but having heard the phrase “political dinosaur”  banded around and with many politicians and other people who hold public office referred to as “dinosaurs”, we thought that just for a bit of fun we could give everyone the opportunity to vote for a dinosaur!

Everything Dinosaur team members have sorted through our range of soft toys and identified our candidates.   We have tried to represent the leaders of seven political parties with a dinosaur soft toy, each soft toy being in the colours of their respective political parties.

Vote Dinosaur! Which Political Dinosaur will you Vote For?

Vote Dinosaur! #votedinosaur

Vote Dinosaur! #votedinosaur

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In alphabetical order we have:

Ed – the red Spinosaurus (Labour).

Dave – the blue Tyrannosaurus rex (Conservative).

Leanne – the green and red Spinosaurus hat (closest item we have that looks like a dragon), for the Party of Wales, (Plaid Cymru).

Natalie – the green Stegosaurus (Green Party)

Nick – the yellow Velociraptor (Liberal Democrats)

Nicola – the Utahraptor (Scottish Nationalist Party)

Nigel – the purple Triceratops (UKIP)

We apologise for not including all the political parties/candidates that are standing on May 7th, but just for a bit of light relief as we head towards the general election we thought it would be fun to give readers the opportunity to vote for a real “dinosaur”.

Vote Dinosaur for the Chance to Win a Dinosaur!

Voting is easy to do, just visit Everything Dinosaur on Facebook (see logo/link below), like our page and comment under the picture of our seven dinosaur candidates telling us which dinosaur soft toy you want to see at Number Ten, Downing Street.  Competition will close when the polling booths close at 10pm on May 7th and we will announce the winner the next day.   A prize draw will be held and one lucky voter will receive the winning soft toy.

So to enter Everything Dinosaur’s competition, all you have to do is “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s FACEBOOK page, then comment on the picture (either here or on Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page)  voting for the dinosaur that you want to be the next Prime Minister.

Everything Dinosaur on FACEBOOK: “LIKE” Our Facebook Page and Enter Competition

For example, if you think that the purple Triceratops called Nigel is your favourite just comment “Nigel” either here in the comments section on this post or on our Facebook page.

We will draw the lucky winner at random and #VoteDinosaur competition closes at 10pm Thursday, May 7th.  Good luck!

Don’t forget to “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s Page on Facebook!

Like our Page (please).
Like our Page (please).

 

To view Everything Dinosaur’s huge range of dinosaur soft toys: Dinosaur Soft Toys

Terms and Conditions of the Everything Dinosaur #VoteDinosaur Competition

Automated entries are not permitted and will be excluded from the draw.

This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

Only one entry per person.

The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative will be offered.

The Everything Dinosaur #VoteDinosaur competition runs until 10pm on May 7th 2015.

Winner will be notified by private message on Facebook.

Prize includes postage and packing.

For full terms and conditions contact: Contact Everything Dinosaur

It’s just for a bit of fun, but we thought we would give everyone the chance to vote for a real “political dinosaur” !

Lottie the Fossil Hunter

Everything Dinosaur Supports Women In Science

With our school visits to deliver dinosaur and fossil themed workshops, Everything Dinosaur team members are heavily involved in helping to promote geology/palaeontology and careers in science to young people.  We are very aware of the need to promote science to both girls and boys and as we visit a large number of schools we recognise that our team members can make an important contribution.  It’s not just our school visits, we supply lots of helpful teaching resources to teachers and home educationalists and provide advice on all sorts of Earth science related subjects from “Anning to Zuniceratops” as our boss, known as “Tyrannosaurus Sue” likes to say.  This week alone, we have provided free lesson plan advice to a Year 6 teacher as they prepare to teach evolution as a term topic, supported a Key Stage 2 teaching team with their fossils and rocks scheme of work and answered questions from school leavers about the potential roles and vocations within the umbrella of palaeontology.  Fact sheets on Smilodon fatalis and Allosaurus fragilis have been emailed to India and we have supplied Ammonite models to help a geologist explain about life in Jurassic marine environments – all this and it is still only Monday.

Dinosaurs and Fossils are Not Just for the Boys!

Encouraging women into the Earth Sciences!

Encouraging women into the Earth Sciences!

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We have been so lucky to have met and worked with some amazing women scientists. That’s why Everything Dinosaur is delighted to introduce “Lottie the fossil hunter doll” into our extensive product range.

Say Hello to “Lottie the Fossil Hunter”

Lottie the Fossil Hunter

Lottie the Fossil Hunter

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We first met Lottie quite a few months ago when she was very much at the prototype stage.  We applaud the efforts of those women behind the TrowelBlazers, celebrating the role of women in archaeology, geology and palaeontology who have done amazing work in the past, continue to do so today and will no doubt be at the cutting edge of the Earth Sciences in the future.  Our boss Sue, (volcanism is her thing), only wishes that Lottie had been around when she was growing up.

To view Lottie the fossil hunter and other educational themed items: Learning All About Dinosaurs and Fossils

Sue commented:

“There have been some wonderful women who have been pioneers in the development of palaeontology and geology and we are all keen to help encourage girls into science careers.  Sadly, in some quarters those Georgian/early Victorian  attitudes that dogged Mary Anning can still be found, but we are doing all we can to stress that dinosaurs and fossils are not just for boys.”

As if to affirm Sue’s comments, we received a letter from Shantel in Year 2 after a dinosaur workshop with her class.  Shantel was delighted that we came to her school as she was “very excited because we love dinosaurs”.

Shantel’s Thank You Letter (Year 2)

Encouraging girls to learn about fossils and life in the past.

Encouraging girls to learn about fossils and life in the past.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur/Southglade Primary School

Great writing Shantel and thank you for your kind words, we know that Lottie the fossil hunter will be very impressed.

Lottie The Fossil Hunter – Girls Rock!

Girls definitely rock!

Girls definitely rock!

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

“Sibirosaurus” Strides In

Potential New Titanosaur Genus from Siberia – “Sibirosaurus”

Scientists at Tomsk State University (Russia) are busy compiling a technical paper and completing further studies that could affirm fossilised remains found in 2008 are those of a giant titanosaurid dinosaur, very probably a new genus as well.  Although titanosaurids are known from most continents, even Antarctica, this, as far as we at Everything Dinosaur are aware, is the first case of a potential Titanosauriform being scientifically described from Russia.  The animal lived in the Late Cretaceous, around 100 million years ago (later part of the Albian faunal stage) and its remains which include cervical vertebrae, a partial scapula (shoulder blade) and elements from the sacrum have been painstakingly extracted from sandstone, which much to the chagrin of the research team is from a band of rock that is as hard as concrete.

The dinosaur’s bones were discovered in strata, that forms part of an eroded cliff on the banks of the Kiya River, close to the small village of Shestakovo in the Kemerovo region of southern Siberia, around ninety miles south-east of the city of Tomsk.

The Excavation Site – Kiya River Location

Palaeontologists need a head for heights.

Palaeontologists need a head for heights.

Picture Credit: Tomsk State University

The fossil bearing strata is located half way up a ten metre high bank and it is only really accessible during the late spring and summer months.  This part of Russia is subject to extremely cold temperatures and a lot of snowfall in the late autumn through to the spring.  From the months of October through to March the average daytime temperature rarely rises above freezing.  However, August temperatures can exceed thirty degrees Celsius.  It is the changing temperatures (freeze/thaw) that lead to erosion of the banks exposing dinosaur fossils.

A Scientist Explores the Fossil Bearing Sediment

A scientist carefully works away at the rock face.

A scientist carefully works away at the rock face.

Picture Credit: Tomsk State University

The fossils were originally discovered back in 2008, they had been preserved inside sandstone concretions and although in some cases the fossils were compressed and they represent just a fraction of the skeleton, their location and size indicate that these fossils consist of the remains of a long-necked dinosaur that would be new to science.

The rocks around the village of Shestakovo have already yielded a number of dinosaur fossil specimens.  Last year, Everything Dinosaur team members reported upon the naming of a new species of Psittacosaurus from fossils found in this locality by scientists working for the Kemerovo regional museum.

To read more about the new species of Psittacosaurus: Russian Scientists Name New Psittacosaurus Species

Commenting on the research, Dr. Stepan Ivantsov (scientific researcher in the Laboratory of Mesozoic and Cenozoic Continental Ecosystems), stated:

“When we discovered this finding, it was only clear that the remains belonged to a very large, herbivorous dinosaur from the Sauropods group.  It was the first scientifically described dinosaur from this group in Russia.  Now after work on the excavation of all the remnants and the restoration [of the bones] is almost completed, we can confidently say that we have found a new species and maybe even a new genus.”

This part of Russia is famous in palaeontological circles for the preserved remains of another large, prehistoric herbivore but one that is geologically hundreds of times younger than any Late Cretaceous dinosaur.  Many fossils of Woolly Mammoths are found in this region, including shed teeth and intact tusks.

A Close up of Some of the Titanosaur Fossil Material

Some of the fragmentary fossils.

Some of the fragmentary fossils.

Picture Credit: Tomsk State University

The fossils in the picture look like elements from the cervical vertebrae (neck bones).  In the background on the right, the posterior end of a large Woolly Mammoth tusk can be seen.  The scientists will continue their studies and a scientific paper on this new dinosaur should be published in the near future, as for where the fossils might end up, the researchers have expressed a wish that they should remain within the palaeontological collection of the University, but stress that they could be put on display for members of the public, as well as students to see.

As fossil material is being constantly eroded out rocks at this site, the scientists hope to find more fossils of Titanosaurs.  In 1995, bones believed to come from the foot of a Titanosaur were also discovered in the same area.  At this stage, the researchers cannot say for certain whether these foot bones are from the same animal whose fossils were found in 2008, they can’t even be sure whether or not the foot bones and the 2008 material come from the same genus.  Still, it is very likely that more dinosaur fossils are awaiting discovery.  The dinosaur has been nick-named Sibirosaurus (lizard from Siberia), but a more formal nomenclature is expected.

A Close Up View of One of the Fossil Specimens

A close up of one of the fossilised bones.

A close up of one of the fossilised bones.

Picture Credit: Tomsk State University

The picture above shows a close up of one of the fossil remains. Although, it is difficult to make out for certain, this fossil might represent a fragment from the sacrum (fused sacral vertebrae).  The sandstone rock is extremely hard and this limits the amount of fossil material that can be removed.  Use of explosives to bring down large portions of the bank have been ruled out as the force from such an explosion would very likely damage any adjacent fossil material.  For the scientists, it is simply a question of allowing natural erosion to do its work, aided and abetted by careful manual excavation whilst hanging onto a rope ladder which dangles several metres down the near vertical bank.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It is very likely that more dinosaur fossil remains will come from the Shestakovo locality, however, they are likely to remain highly fragmentary making species level identification very difficult.  However, this fossil material adds to our understanding about the globally distributed Titanosaurs, some of which were the largest terrestrial animals known to science.”

Everything Dinosaur acknowledges the role of the Siberian Times in the compilation of this article.

An Update on the Utahraptors

Preparation of Stone Block in a Bid to Learn Utahraptor Pack Secrets

In early 2015, Everything Dinosaur team members reported on the excavation and removal of a massive 9,000 kilogramme block from the Arches National Park (eastern Utah).  The block contains the fossilised remains of at least six different Utahraptors (U. ostrommaysorum).  These were fast and agile predatory dinosaurs that roamed the western United States some 125 million years ago (Early Cretaceous).  Fossils of an Iguanodont were also found at this remote location.  It has been suggested that the ferocious Utahraptors may have been attracted to the area by the stench of the rotting carcase of this Ornithopod.  Unfortunately, these creatures seem to have become trapped in soft ground (the same likely fate as their intended Iguanodont victim), as a result several specimens have been preserved together.

An Illustration of Utahraptor (U. ostrommaysorum)

Speedy, dinosaur hunters

Speedy, dinosaur hunters

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

 We think that Utahraptor is the largest member of the Dromaeosauridae family yet described.  It may have reached lengths in excess of seven metres or more and palaeontologists hope that these fossils will greatly increase the understanding of Utahraptor anatomy and ontogeny.  Ontogeny is the study of how an animal grows.   Amongst the fossils documented so far are a number of skulls.  These range in size from a little over ten centimetres (a very young animal), to a skull more than six times as big (the skull of a fully grown adult).

The Huge Bounder Wrapped in Burlap and Plaster

The logistics of fossil transportation.

The logistics of fossil transportation.

Picture Credit: ABC News

 To read Everything Dinosaur’s original article on the Utahraptor excavation: One Nine Tonne Block = 6 Potential Utahraptors

It will take many months to prepare the fossils, extracting them with great care from the surrounding matrix.  Their orientation and layout are as important as the fossils themselves.  They may provide clues as to the sequence of deposition and possibly reveal evidence of pack behaviour in these very bird-like predators.  The removal and transport of such a huge boulder was extremely difficult, especially when the relatively remote location of the Mesa where the specimen is from is taken into consideration.  However, the picture above shows the great care taken by Utah’s Department for Natural Resources in order to ensure a happy ending to this highly complicated logistical undertaking.

We await further developments and the publication of scientific papers documenting these fossils over the next eighteen months or so.

Still Time to Enter Everything Dinosaur’s Prehistoric Animal Model Competition

Still Time to Enter Everything Dinosaur’s Model Competition

WIN! WIN! WIN! with Everything Dinosaur!  Closing date for competition Tuesday March 24th.  PLEASE NOTE THIS COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED

There is still time to enter Everything Dinosaur’s win a set of the new for 2015 CollectA prehistoric animal models competition, but you can’t afford to hang about as the closing date is less than a week away.

CollectA, those clever model and figure manufacturers have introduced some amazingly detailed, new prehistoric animal figures this year  and we are giving one lucky dinosaur model fan the chance to get their hands on a set of these models.

CollectA Prehistoric Animal Models to Win
Win a set of CollectA models with Everything Dinosaur!

Win a set of CollectA models with Everything Dinosaur!

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur 

Included in our super prehistoric animal giveaway is the mighty 1:40 scale Pliosaur, two horned dinosaurs Nasutoceratops and Medusaceratops, the ferocious Xiongguanlong, Daxiatitan, a huge, plant-eating dinosaur from China, the Temnodontosaurus and a pair of magnificent prehistoric mammal models Daeodon and Moropus (both 1:20 scale).  Eight fantastic collector’s items, the very first to come off the production line and to win this prize all you have to do is to come up with a collective noun for a collection of CollectA!  It really is as easy as that.

To take part in Everything Dinosaur’s competition, all you have to do is “Like” Everything Dinosaur’s FACEBOOK page, then comment on the picture (either here or on Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page)  including a suggestion for the collective noun for a set of CollectA prehistoric animal replicas.

Everything Dinosaur on FACEBOOK: “LIKE” Our Facebook Page and Enter Competition

For example, if the collective noun for a group of lions is a “pride” and we have a “pack” of dogs, a “swarm” of bees, a “gaggle” of geese, then what term can you come up with for a collection of CollectA prehistoric animals?

We will draw the lucky winner at random and the name caption competition closes on Tuesday, March 24th.  Good luck!

Just visit Everything Dinosaur’s Facebook page, give our page a “like” and then leave a comment on the picture showing the set of eight prehistoric animal models. What collective noun can you come up with?

“Like” Everything Dinosaur’s Page on Facebook

Like our Page (please).

Like our Page (please).

 

Super CollectA Models to Win Thanks to Everything Dinosaur
Win a fantastic set of 8 prehistoric animal models.

Win a fantastic set of eight CollectA models.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

PLEASE NOTE THIS COMPETITION IS NOW CLOSED

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of CollectA prehistoric animals: CollectA Dinosaurs and Other Replicas

To see the full range of CollectA scale prehistoric animal replicas: CollectA Scale Prehistoric Animals

Terms and Conditions of the Everything Dinosaur Collective Noun Competition

Automated entries are not permitted and will be excluded from the draw.

This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

Only one entry per person.

The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative will be offered.

The Everything Dinosaur collective noun caption competition runs until March 24th 2015.

Winner will be notified by private message on Facebook.

Prize includes postage and packing.

For full terms and conditions contact: Contact Everything Dinosaur

Dinosaur Nest Site Vandalised

Vandals Destroy Dinosaur Nests and Footprints

Everything Dinosaur has received press reports that vandals have smashed a number of dinosaur eggs and footprints that made up part of an outdoor display at the Mirador del Cretáceo dig site  in Coll de Nargó, Catalonia (north-eastern Spain).  The tourist attraction was opened in 2005 and combines a serious palaeontological study of Upper Cretaceous highly fossiliferous sediments with a tourist attraction, which permits onlookers to walk round the site and to view some of the fossil specimens in situ as well as other exhibits that show how dinosaurs nested.

Some of the items believed to have been smashed include dinosaur eggs that had been reassembled from the fossil remains to give the impression that they had just been laid.

Sites containing dinosaur egg remains and evidence of nesting behaviour are extremely rare and the dig site in the Pyrénéen village is believed to represent the largest location of its kind yet discovered in Europe.  In addition, the fossils are very well preserved and these in conjunction with the numerous dinosaur footprints that have been mapped in the area indicate the presence of at least six different types of dinosaur present in this Late Cretaceous ecosystem.

One of the Fossilised Eggs Preserved at the Site

An important Late Cretaceous dig site.

An important Late Cretaceous dig site.

Picture Credit: (Xavier Delclòs, Faculty of Geology UB)

Sadly, this is not the only example of vandalism reported upon by Everything Dinosaur, back in 2012, team members from Everything Dinosaur published an article about an act of dinosaur vandalism in Alberta, Canada.

To read more about this incident: Hooligans smash duck-billed dinosaur fossils

More recently, a Sauropod bone at the Dinosaur Monument in Utah was broken and a piece stolen, this theft and the damage to that part of the bone that remained led to the specimen having to be removed.

Salvador Moyà, the manager at the Palaeolithic Institute of Catalunya (ICP) called the destruction of the fossils “inconceivable” and the mayor of Coll de Nargó, Senor Benito Fité stated that this was a “catastrophe”.

These incidents are all to frequent, especially at sites which are relatively open and allow public access.  Back in 2013, the site was raided by a local resident and several specimens stolen.  These were only returned when it became public knowledge that whoever was responsible for the theft would face prosecution for their criminal action.

Wild Safari Dinosaurs Monolophosaurus Wins Award

Monolophosaurus Voted Best Prehistoric Animal Toy Figure of 2014

Readers of “Prehistoric Times” magazine have voted the Monolophosaurus dinosaur model made by Safari Ltd as the best prehistoric animal toy figure for 2014.  This dinosaur is known from just one fossil specimen found in north-western China (Xinjiang Province), it has been assigned to the Megalosauroidea super-family of the Theropoda, although its phylogenetic affinities remain unclear.  It was certainly a formidable hunter, reaching lengths in excess of five metres and perhaps weighing as much as four male African lions (Panthero leo).

Award Winning Monolophosaurus Dinosaur Model

Middle Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur

Middle Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd

This model, originally sculpted by Doug Watson, is part of the highly successful Wild Safari Dinosaurs model range made by Safari Ltd.   The Monopholosaurus was one of three, new dinosaurs added to this range in 2014, the others being the spinosaurid Suchomimus and the horned dinosaur Pachyrhinosaurus.

Everything Dinosaur produced a short, video review of this model back in February 2014.  This video (running time of 5:49), provides details about this dinosaur, its discovery and reflects on the way the model maker has interpreted the fossil evidence.

Everything Dinosaur Reviews the Wild Safari Dinosaurs Monolophosaurus

Video Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It’s a pat on the back for Safari Ltd for having their Monolophosaurus honoured in this way.  For us, it is very pleasing to see Middle Jurassic dinosaurs from China being included in such a prestigious model series.  Most model ranges include the likes of Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex but for a company to produce a replica of Monolophosaurus, this really helps to make that range stand out.”

To view the range of Safari Ltd models available from Everything Dinosaur: Safari Ltd Prehistoric Animal Models

For us, what’s the most intriguing thing about “Single Crested Lizard”?  Surprisingly, it’s not trying to work out the function of that bizarre, thin crest on the head.  The jawbone of the holotype showed signs of puncture marks and scratches that were made by the teeth of another meat-eating dinosaur.  Since no other parts of the holotype fossil material showed such signs, this was interpreted as not post-mortem scavenging on the carcase, but evidence of “face biting” between rivals, perhaps even siblings.

The End of the Line for the Carnegie Collectibles Range

Safari Ltd and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History Part Company

It has been announced that Safari Ltd, the American figure and model manufacturer, has ended its twenty-eight year collaboration with the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.  This means that the scale model series known as the Carnegie Collectibles will be coming to an end.  First marketed in 1988, the Carnegie Collectibles range has featured a number of iconic dinosaur figures, the 1:10 scale feathered Velociraptor model, which arrived at Everything Dinosaur’s website just a few weeks ago, will be the last of this series to have been introduced.

The Carnegie Collectibles Feathered Velociraptor Model

Available from Everything Dinosaur in 2015.

Available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd

The hand-painted replicas have been a staple for dinosaur fans and model collectors alike.  Each figure was authenticated by palaeontologists at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) and this model series had been described as “the world’s premier line of scale model dinosaur figures.”

Alexandre Pariente (CEO of Safari Ltd) commented:

“We have thoroughly enjoyed working with Carnegie, so this was a very difficult decision.  We are proud of the value created through this cooperative effort over the years for our Carnegie Dinosaurs line.  We took our time and carefully analysed Safari’s direction and ultimately concluded that Carnegie and Safari have divergent interests and it made sense for us to part ways.  We wish Carnegie will in its future endeavours.”

In contrast to the limited numbers of new models introduced under the Carnegie Collectibles banner, the Wild Safari Dinos range, had four new additions, this year, including the highly acclaimed Yutyrannus replica, which joins an ever growing list of Theropod replicas within this series.  For example, a new interpretation of Suchomimus was added in 2014 along with an award winning Monolophosaurus dinosaur model.

The Feathered Yutyrannus (Y. huali) Part of the Wild Safari Dinos Model Range

Available from Everything Dinosaur in 2015.

Available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd

Safari Ltd have stated that they are moving forward and exploring new opportunities, including the potential to work with other museums and educational institutions that have significant prospects for growth and the potential to add value to the educational marketplace.

CEO Alexandre Pariente went onto add:

“While Safari Ltd very much appreciates the years of great collaboration with Carnegie in creating the best quality figurines that helped teach children around the globe about dinosaurs we’re not looking back.”

We imagine that there will be even greater emphasis place on the Wild Safari Dinos range and we at Everything Dinosaur are already anticipating a number of new releases in this line in 2016.

Production has ended for the Carnegie Collectibles range, which means that stocks will soon run out.  Collectors and dinosaur fans therefore, only have a short window of opportunity to purchase any models that they have not yet acquired.

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur stated:

“We do understand the reasons for the relationship between these two fine organisations coming to an end.  However, we know how committed Safari Ltd are to the production of fine quality, hand-painted prehistoric animal models and we, as long-term partners of Safari Ltd look forward to working with them even closer over the next few years.”

Everything Dinosaur has stocks of this model range and a further shipment is due in shortly, but once they’re gone, they’re gone!

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of Carnegie Collectible prehistoric animal replicas: Safari Ltd Carnegie Collectibles and Wild Safari Dinos

How Long and Heavy was Megalosaurus?

Answering Questions from Young Dinosaur Fans

Lots of questions from dinosaur fans and model collectors this week.  Everything Dinosaur team members are spending some of today catching up with their correspondence.  One of the questions we have been asked this week concerned that Middle Jurassic Theropod called Megalosaurus (M. bucklandii).  A couple of young dinosaur enthusiasts had enquired about just how big and heavy this dinosaur was.  This is a difficult question to answer, given the lectotype for this species is a partial right dentary, not too many clues there as to maximum body mass.   Some authors suggest a length of around six metres, although most suggest that this meat-eater grew to lengths in excess of nine metres.

As for body weight, this is not easy to estimate with any degree of certainly.  However, it is very likely that this dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic weighed in excess of one tonne, possibly as much as three tonnes, according to some authors.

Providing Information on Megalosaurus (M. bucklandii)

A scale drawing of Megalosaurus.

A scale drawing of Megalosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Congratulations to Pegasus T. rex and Triceratops Model Kits

Pegasus Dinosaur Model Kits Best Prehistoric Animal Model Kits of 2014

The Pegasus Tyrannosaurus rex and the Pegasus Triceratops model kits have been voted the best prehistoric animal model kits of 2014 by readers of Prehistoric Times magazine.  The beautiful and highly detailed models are based on sculptures created by Galileo Hernandez Nunez of Mexico and each replica is in approximately 1:24 scale.  Readers of Prehistoric Times magazine were asked to vote on the most impressive model introduced last year and these acclaimed kits won easily.

Pegasus Hobbies – Triceratops

Great quality model kit to build and paint.

Great quality model kit to build and paint.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“These are a superb range of scale model replicas which are aimed at dinosaur fans, collectors and model builders.  Designed by top figure sculptors, they provide model makers from fourteen years and upwards with the chance to assemble and paint fantastic prehistoric animal replicas.  Each model in the range, including the new Spinosaurus, is supplied with its own educational fact sheet, researched and written by Everything Dinosaur team members.”

To view the range of Pegasus Hobbies dinosaur kits: Pegasus Hobbies (Dinosaur Model Kits)

Top Quality Tyrannosaurus rex Replica Kit

A model kit featuring the "Tyrant Lizard King".

A model kit featuring the “Tyrant Lizard King”.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Everything Dinosaur team members would like to add their congratulations to Pegasus Hobbies.

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