All about dinosaurs, fossils and prehistoric animals by Everything Dinosaur team members.
/Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings

Drawings of dinosaurs and other prehistoric animals either done by team members or sent into Everything Dinosaur.

31 08, 2017

Siberian Villager Finds Steppe Mammoth Remains

By | August 31st, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal News Stories, Main Page|0 Comments

A Mammoth in the Vegetable Patch

Everything Dinosaur has been informed about an article recently published in the “Siberian Times” reporting that a resident of the small and relatively remote village of Oy, in the Sakha Republic of north-eastern Russia, has found the fossilised remains of a Steppe Mammoth (M. trogontherii).  The local man was hoping to plant cabbage and potatoes in their vegetable patch but instead their digging uncovered the substantial tusks of a long-extinct member of the elephant family.

The newspaper reports that the tusks measure 2.7 metres in length and at their base they are around 50 centimetres in diameter.  Palaeontologists and a regional historian, Prokopiy Nagovitsyn, were called in to assess the villager’s fossil discovery.  Officials are quoted as estimating the tusks at around 400,000-years-old.

A Line Drawing of a Steppe Mammoth (Mammuthus trogontherii)

Steppe Mammoth illustration.

An illustration of a Steppe Mammoth (Mammuthus trogontherii).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Not Revealing the Exact Location of the Fossil Find

The historian (Prokopiy Nagovitsyn), explained that due to “understandable reasons”, the exact location of the fossil find was not being revealed.  If the location was known, this might attract unscrupulous ivory hunters who might attempt to steal the valuable tusks or they might be tempted to start their own excavations.

The vegetable patch discovery is described as “an extraordinary fossil find”.  Numerous Woolly Mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius), specimens are known from the Sakha Republic, the finding of the fossilised remains of a much more ancient Steppe Mammoth is a much rarer event.  Steppe Mammoths predate the Woolly Mammoth by hundreds of thousands of years.  Larger than M. primigenius, probably the largest of the Mammoth family, with adult males estimated to have weighed as much as fifteen tonnes, the Steppe Mammoth roamed Siberia from around 600,00 years ago to as recently as 370,000 years ago.

In 2015, an almost complete fossil skeleton of a Steppe Mammoth was discovered in the same region of Russia.  The Steppe Mammoth is believed to have evolved from the southern, ancestral Mammoth (Mammuthus meridionalis).

27 08, 2017

Ceratopsian Cladogram

By | August 27th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Piecing Together the Horned Dinosaur Family Tree

Plans are in place at Everything Dinosaur to create a pdf file that highlights the evolution, radiation and diversity of the Ceratopsia.  The aim is to use the numerous illustrations of horned dinosaurs that the company has built up in its extensive database to produce a simplified horned dinosaur family tree.  Dinosaur fans will be aware that over the last two decades, the number of formally described ceratopsid dinosaurs has increased significantly, mostly due to the number of new Late Cretaceous horned dinosaurs named from fossil discoveries in the United States and Canada.  Model collectors will also know that there have been several new horned dinosaur models introduced over the last few years.  This trend is set to continue.  For every named prehistoric animal model that Everything Dinosaur supplies, we send out an accompanying fact sheet with that figure.  In this way, our own image library for the ceratopsids has dramatically increased.

An Illustration of a Recently Described Horned Dinosaur

Scale drawing of the horned dinosaur Nasutoceratops.

A scale drawing of the Late Campanian horned dinosaur called Nasutoceratops.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above shows a scale drawing of the Centrosaurine Ceratopsian Nasutoceratops (N. titusi) which was named and described in 2013.

To read an article about the discovery and naming of Nasutoceratops: Large Nose Horn Face

Centrosaurine and Chasmosaurine

Traditionally, whilst the Ceratopsia includes numerous basal horned dinosaurs, the Ceratopsidae family, has been classified into two sub-families based on cranial ornamentation and horn morphology -the Centrosaurinae and the Chasmosaurinae.  The large horned dinosaurs of the Late Cretaceous period, specifically the Ceratopsidae, were all quadrupedal with heavy, armoured heads.  Palaeontologists used a simple method of assigning these types of dinosaurs to a sub-family:

  • Centrosaurines – short neck frill with a large nose horn, bigger than the brow horns.  This very simplistic description does not mean that Centrosaurines had short frills.  Most frills were ornamented and in the case of the Centrosaurine Styracosaurus – spectacular.

A Drawing of the Spectacular “Short-frilled” Centrosaurine Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus illustrated.

A drawing of the horned dinosaur Styracosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

  • Chasmosaurines – long neck frill with long snouts and the brow horns were usually bigger and more prominent than the nasal horn.

An Illustration of the Recently Described Chasmosaurine Regaliceratops (R. peterhewsi)

Regaliceratops drawing.

A drawing of the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

 

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

As with most things related to palaeontology, the rather simplistic classification of Centrosaurines and Chasmosaurines has been undermined as new discoveries have been made.  A case in point, is the recently described Regaliceratops (see picture above).  It is for this reason that Everything Dinosaur team members are wanting to create their own cladogram.  We need some more illustrations to complete our data set, but once these have been commissioned we shall post up our own version of the horned dinosaur family tree.  It might be interesting to populate one cladogram using our own dinosaur illustrations, a second, identical phylogenetic analysis can be produced, but this time using the actual models to illustrate the various taxonomic positions.  It’s still a work in progress at the moment, but hopefully, we shall be able to produce something in the near future.

26 08, 2017

The Diversity of Early Cretaceous Feathered Theropods

By | August 26th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Wonderful Early Cretaceous Theropod Dinosaur Illustration

Sometimes at Everything Dinosaur, we get asked fascinating questions.  For example, we were emailed this week by a fossil collector asking how many different types of feathered dinosaur were there?  That’s a question, the answer to which, as new fossil discoveries are made, keeps changing.  Since the discovery of Sinosauropteryx in 1996 and its subsequent scientific description, numerous feathered dinosaur fossil discoveries have been made.  In all likelihood, within the Theropoda alone, there were probably hundreds of different types of feathered dinosaur.

The diversity of the feathered Theropods is beautifully illustrated by this wonderful image created by Jan Sovak.

An Illustration of the Diversity of Coelurosaurian Theropods (Early Cretaceous China)

Feathered Theropod diversity (Early Cretaceous)

The diversity of feathered Theropods in northern China during the Early Cretaceous.

Picture Credit: Jan Sovak

This image depicts part of the Liaoning biota of the Early Cretaceous.  The picture illustrates a variety of different types of feathered dinosaurs, (all Coelurosaurian dinosaurs).  A pair of Sinosauropteryx (right), chase a small mammal.  Sinosauropteryx is an example of a compsognathid Theropod.  To the left, two Microraptors pursue a dragonfly.  Microraptors come from another branch of the Coelurosauria clade, the dromaeosaurids, sometimes referred to as the “raptors”.  In the background, an ornate couple of dinosaurs are displaying to each other.  They are conducting an intricate courtship display and are oblivious to what is going on around them.  This is a pair of Caudipteryx dinosaurs, complete with beautiful tail plumes.  Caudipteryx is yet another example of a type of feathered Theropod.  Caudipteryx is a member of the oviraptorosaurian group.

Our dedicated team members compiled the information required by our emailer and duly sent it off, along with some links to other articles written by Everything Dinosaur staff that illustrate some of the huge variety of different dinosaurs we listed.

25 08, 2017

Chinese Stegosaurs

By | August 25th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Stegosaurs from China

With the addition of the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs model range to the Everything Dinosaur portfolio, we have had to increase the number of Stegosaur illustrations in our database.  The Dashanpu Formation (Sichuan Province, south-western China) has produced a large number of stegosaurian fossil remains and a number of genera have been erected. The majority of the specimens have been found in the Upper Shaximiao Formation, but the Lower Shaximiao Formation has also yielded Thyreophorans, notably Huayangosaurus, which led to the establishment of the Huayangosauridae family, to which the later Chungkingosaurus has been assigned.

The Illustration of Chungkingosaurus (C. jiangbeiensis) Commissioned by Everything Dinosaur

Chungkinogsaurus illustrated.

An illustration of the Chinese Stegosaur Chungkingosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

There are members of the Stegosauria clade in the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs large models, an example of which is Chungkingosaurus, illustrated in the line drawing above.  In addition, the smaller models, the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Toys include a number of armoured dinosaur representatives.  Four of the twenty-four models in this series are Stegosaurs, namely Kentrosaurus, Wuerhosaurus, Miragaia and Tuojiangosaurus, but surprisingly, despite the inclusion of an Ankylosaurus, there is no Stegosaurus, arguably the best-known of all the Stegosauridae, currently in this range (yet).

The PNSO Age of Dinosaur Toys Wuerhosaurus

The PNSO Wuerhosaurus dinosaur model.

PNSO Wuerhosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Asian Origin for Stegosaurs?

Such was the diversity of Stegosaur fossil remains from the Sichuan Province (south-western China), that it had been thought that the Stegosaurs evolved in Asia.  A review of the fossil material undertaken in 2006* reassessed the seven named genera of Stegosaur based on fossil material from the Upper Jurassic of China.  These Chinese fossils represented a diversity of Stegosaurs not found anywhere else in the world during the Late Jurassic.  The researchers concluded that only Tuojiangosaurus multispinus, Chungkingosaurus jiangbeiensis and Gigantspinosaurus sichuanensis were valid taxa and therefore, the origin of the Stegosauria remained uncertain.

The Illustration Prepared for the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Tuojiangosaurus multispinus Model

A drawing of Tuojiangosaurus.

Tuojiangosaurus illustrated.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

A spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur commented:

“It is wonderful to see more Stegosaur figures and the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Stegosaurs are in danger of selling out, however, we intend to bring in more stocks soon.  It is refreshing to see some of the lesser-known taxa being represented in an affordable model range.”

The spokesperson went onto state that a number of new illustrations has recently been commissioned and that more drawings would be added to Everything Dinosaur’s database in the near future.  The company receives lots of dinosaur and prehistoric animal drawings from dinosaur fans and they would be particularly interested to receive illustrations of armoured dinosaurs.

To view the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Stegosaur figures and the rest of the PNSO prehistoric animal models: PNSO Age of Dinosaurs

The 2006 Paper: “A Review of the Late Jurassic Stegosaurs (Dinosauria, Stegosauria) from the People’s Republic of China” by Maidment, Susannah C.R.; Guangbiao Wei.

14 08, 2017

Basilosaurus Illustrated

By | August 14th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

A Drawing of the Early Predatory Whale Basilosaurus

Basilosaurus was one of the first, large whales to evolve.  This animal named “regal reptile”, the first species of which was named and described by Richard Owen (Basilosaurus cetoides), in 1839, has grown in popularity amongst fans of prehistoric animals.  Basilosaurus appeared in an episode of the “Walking with Beasts” television series made by the BBC, (episode two “Whale Killer”).  With CollectA recently introducing a replica of this placental mammal, collectors have the opportunity to add an early cetacean to their model collection.   Everything Dinosaur has commissioned drawings of Basilosaurus.  In the light of the adding of the PNSO range of models to Everything Dinosaur’s huge product portfolio, we have posted up a PNSO inspired Basilosaurus drawing, one that has not been published on this blog that often.

An Illustration of the Giant Prehistoric Whale Basilosaurus

PNSO Basilosaurus illustration.

An illustration of Basilosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Although this fearsome carnivore, superficially resembled the toothed whales that are around today.  Basilosaurus was an evolutionary dead end, when Basilosaurus became extinct some 36 million years ago, towards the end of the Eocene Epoch, it left no descendants.  The drawing above is based on the PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Basilosaurus replica.

The PNSO Age of Dinosaurs Basilosaurus Replica

The PNSO Basilosaurus replica.

The Basilosaurus replica (PNSO).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

In addition to this illustration, Everything Dinosaur also commissioned a line drawing of the CollectA Basilosaurus replica.  Both of these drawings were commissioned to support our work producing data sheets and fact sheets about prehistoric animals.

The Illustration of the CollectA Basilosaurus Model (Everything Dinosaur)

CollectA Basilosaurus illustration.

The CollectA Basilosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Compare the line drawing of the CollectA Basilosaurus model, with a picture of the actual CollectA Basilosaurus (seen below).

The CollectA Basilosaurus Model

An early whale model - CollectA Basilosaurus

The CollectA Basilosaurus model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

31 07, 2017

A Scale Drawing of the Spinosaurid Suchomimus

By | July 31st, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

Suchomimus Scale Drawing

Suchomimus (S. tenerensis) fossils were first found in 1973, but at the time, little was known about spinosaurids.  Recent reviews of the fossil material have placed this dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Niger within the Spinosauridae, specifically assigned to the Baryonychidae.  Some studies (2002), concluded that the fossil material represented a second species of Baryonyx and proposed the name Baryonyx tenerensis.  Subsequent research established a number of autapomorphies (distinctive features), between the fossils assigned to Baryonyx and Suchomimus, enabling the two genera to be retained.  Suchomimus was probably very closely related to Baryonyx walkeri.

A Scale Drawing of Suchomimus (S. tenerensis)

Suchomimus scale drawing.

A scale drawing of the Theropod Suchomimus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The hosting rock has been dated to the Late Aptian faunal stage, suggesting that Suchomimus lived many millions of years after Baryonyx.  Like Baryonyx, the first fossil material found was an enlarged thumb claw.  The holotype fossil material of Suchomimus is much bigger than the holotype fossil material of Baryonyx (B. walkeri).  However, as the ages of the individual dinosaurs are not known, direct size comparisons are not relevant.  Based on the Suchomimus material (and that previously assigned to Cristatusaurus lapparenti), Suchomimus could have exceeded eleven metres in length and weighed as much as four tonnes.

Suchomimus translates as “crocodile mimic”, a reference to the long, crocodile-like snout, lined with conical teeth adapted for grasping slippery prey such as fish.

20 03, 2017

Taking Uintatherium Out on a Date

By | March 20th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|2 Comments

When Did Uintatherium anceps Live?

Everything Dinosaur is preparing for the imminent arrival of the new for 2017 CollectA “Prehistoric Life” models.  The first batch will be arriving at our warehouse very soon, but we are in the process of finalising the fact sheets prior to arrival of other new editions to the CollectA range, due to come into stock later this year.  One of the new fact sheets has left us scratching our collective heads, it concerns an ancient prehistoric mammal that has a reputation for stumping even the most talented and dedicated of palaeontologists.

The beastie is Uintatherium (U. anceps) to be more precise, our team members have been scanning the literature trying to pinpoint the approximate time in geological history that this particular species of “Uintah beast” roamed.

Everything Dinosaur’s Illustration of the CollectA Deluxe Uintatherium Model

Uintatherium anceps drawing.

A scale drawing of the bizarre Uintatherium.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Eocene Giant

Uintatherium is one of the more spectacular of a bizarre Order or extinct mammals called the Dinocerata (terrible horns).  Along with the genus Eobasileus, Uintatherium represents one of the largest of this strange Order of mammals, an Order that palaeontologists can’t quite agree where to place amongst the Mammalia.  They are placentals, but their exact position on the mammal family tree and the taxonomic relationship to the other Orders remains controversial.  Scientists such as Earl Manning and Donald R. Prothero have speculated that the simple cheek teeth of these animals might indicate an affinity with the ungulates (mammals with hooves).  Other academics have suggested that the dentition (teeth), most closely resemble the teeth of the Mongolian rabbit relative Pseudictops.  In this is the case, then the Uintatherium could be an example of a “huge horned bunny”!

Uintatheres and the Bone Wars

The role of these Eocene animals in the “Bone Wars” the disputes between the palaeontologists – Leidy, Marsh and Cope has been well documented, but what is not so clear, is when did Uintatherium, specifically U. anceps live?  We have scanned the literature and we have found dates ranging from 53 million years ago to as recently as 37 million years ago.  We doubt whether a single species could have persisted for this long, even in the most stable of environments, so have you any information of when Uintatherium anceps roamed the Earth?

Fact Sheet Being Prepared for the Arrival of the Deluxe CollectA Uintatherium Model in June

CollectA Deluxe Uintatherium model.

The CollectA Uintatherium model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The view the range of CollectA Deluxe scale prehistoric animal models: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models

With a little luck (and a lot more research), we will be able to complete the Uintatherium data, the next fact sheet will have to prepare is a Brontothere.  This “thunder beast” might have superficially resembled Uintatherium, but it was not that close related.  However, the Brontotherium fact sheet is being put together as Everything Dinosaur will be bringing in a new line shortly, but more about that later…

7 03, 2017

A Royal Ceratopsian

By | March 7th, 2017|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Main Page, Photos of Everything Dinosaur Products|0 Comments

Regaliceratops peterhewsi – Awaiting the new CollectA Model

We are expecting the first batch of new for 2017 CollectA models to arrive shortly.  The CollectA Prehistoric Life Regaliceratops model should be amongst the first of these new models to be delivered into our warehouse and team members at Everything Dinosaur have been busy preparing the fact sheet that will be sent out accompanying sales of this model.

Preparing for the CollectA Fact Sheet

A drawing of the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

A scale drawing of the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Hundreds of Prehistoric Animal Fact Sheets

Regaliceratops means “Royal Horned Face”, honouring the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller (Alberta, Canada), as well as paying tribute to that amazing head shield with its rounded epocipitals.  For every fact sheet that we produce, we commission a drawing of the prehistoric animal and the picture above shows our Regaliceratops and a human figure next to it for scale.  Our dinosaur experts estimate that this horned dinosaur would have weighed perhaps as much as two thousand kilogrammes and the head shield would have been some three and a half metres tall in a fully grown adult.  The Regaliceratops fact sheet from Everything Dinosaur is number 814, this gives readers an idea of just how many fact sheets we have written.  Other new fact sheets include one for Basilosaurus, a fact sheet for the marine reptile Excalibosaurus and a fact sheet for the CollectA Gigantspinosaurus replica.  All of these figures will be in stock at Everything Dinosaur very soon.

The CollectA Regaliceratops Dinosaur Model

CollectA Prehistoric Life Regaliceratops model.

The CollectA Regaliceratops horned dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Romantic Regaliceratops

The dinosaur shows characteristics of both the Chasmosaurinae and the Centrosaurinae tribes of the Ceratopsia and hopefully more fossils of this enigmatic horned dinosaur will be found in the future.  In the meantime, we have the arrival of the new for 2017 CollectA Regaliceratops to look forward to.  Academic papers can make quite dry and sober reading.  There is a strict etiquette to be observed when writing them, especially those that are up for peer review.  However, one of the authors of the scientific paper describing R. peterhewsi showed his romantic side, as in the acknowledgements section of the paper, Dr Caleb Brown sneaked in a marriage proposal to his long-time partner Dr Lorna O’Brien.  We are happy to report that Dr O’Brien accepted.

Dr Brown’s Proposal of Marriage in the Scientific Paper

A marriage proposal inserted into the Regaliceratops paper.

By “Royal Command”.

Picture Credit: Current Biology

I guess you could say that this is one marriage proposal that has received royal approval.

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of CollectA Prehistoric Life Models: CollectA Prehistoric Life Models

16 12, 2016

Updating the Deinocheirus Fact Sheet

By | December 16th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Everything Dinosaur News and Updates, Everything Dinosaur Products, Main Page, Press Releases|0 Comments

Deinocheirus Fact Sheet is Updated

One of the wonderful things about vertebrate palaeontology is that ideas about prehistoric animals are changing all the time.  Fossil discoveries and new research often challenges existing assumptions leading to a revision of data.  Model making companies often reflect the changing views about a long extinct animal by introducing a new version of that animal to their prehistoric animal model portfolio.  CollectA for example, recently introduced a new model of the bizarre Late Cretaceous Theropod Deinocheirus (D. mirificus).  In addition, CollectA will be bringing out a new Deluxe version of Deinocheirus in 2017.  This means, that for Everything Dinosaur team members, there is a need to update and revise the company’s Deinocheirus fact sheet.

The New Scale Drawing of Deinocheirus from Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus mirificus scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Deinocheirus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus – Taller than a Lamppost!

Thanks to two new fossil discoveries (a sub-adult found in 2006 and the fossils of a much larger individual discovered in 2009), palaeontologists have a much better idea about what this giant ornithomimid looked like.  As a result, further changes to the Everything Dinosaur fact sheet have been made.  In the original data sheet, prepared in 2012, prior to the scientific paper providing the new description, it was stated that the known fossils ascribed to Deinocheirus represented one of the largest Theropods from Asia.  This remains true, however, an assessment of the fossilised bones of the individual found in 2009, including a humerus six centimetres longer than the holotype, indicate that Deinocheirus reached a length of around eleven metres.  Subsequent study of the strongly reinforced pelvis and the robust hind limbs have led palaeontologists to reconsider how heavy this animal might have been.  It probably had a narrower stance than the pot-bellied Therizinosaurs, but scientists estimate that Deinocheirus might have weighed as much as six tonnes and it would have stood around five metres tall.

The New for 2017 CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Deinocheirus Replica

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus model.

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We look forward to the arrival of the new CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Deinocheirus replica and the other exciting new models to be added to CollectA’s “Prehistoric Life” model range.

To read more about the new CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus: New CollectA Models for 2017 (part 2)

12 12, 2016

A Drawing of Regaliceratops

By | December 12th, 2016|Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings, Dinosaur Fans, Main Page|0 Comments

A Drawing of Regaliceratops

As Everything Dinosaur prepares for the arrival of the first of the new for 2017 prehistoric animal models from CollectA, which are due to arrive in the first quarter next year, team members have been busy preparing fact sheets to accompany the new models.  When fact sheets are prepared, illustrations of the prehistoric animal featured are required, below is the drawing that will be used to illustrate the fact sheet all about the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

A Drawing of the Horned Dinosaur Regaliceratops

Regaliceratops drawing.

A drawing of the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Regaliceratops peterhewsi

Geologist Peter Hews discovered a large fossilised skull in strata estimated to be around 68 million years old back in 2005.  The fossil material consisted of a substantial amount of the skull, some elements were missing such as the dentary (lower jaw) and the rostral bone, although the majority of the skull bones were present.  The fossil came from the St Mary River Formation exposures of south-western Alberta (Canada).  The genus name honours the Royal Tyrrell Museum (Drumheller, Alberta) as well as giving a nod to that flamboyant crown-like bony frill.  The specific epithet honours the discoverer of the holotype fossil material as well as giving recognition the geologist’s contribution to the study of the St Mary River Formation.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s 2015 article about the naming of this Late Cretaceous dinosaur: Regaliceratops – A Right Royal Rumble

For an article on the new for 2017 CollectA Regaliceratops dinosaur model: New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 2)

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