Category: Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings

Adding Another Diplodocus Drawing to our Portfolio

Everything Dinosaur Adds Another Diplodocus

There are a number of species assigned to the Diplodocus genus, at least three, but potentially there may be several more (nomen dubium, Seismosaurus and Amphicoelias notwithstanding).  Everything Dinosaur has commissioned almost as many Diplodocus illustrations as there were potential species.   Our latest Diplodocus drawing is going to be used in several projects including within an updated Diplodocus fact sheet (Diplodocus longus).

Everything Dinosaur’s Illustration of Diplodocus (D. longus)

A drawing of Diplodocus.

A drawing of Diplodocus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Named As a Result of Its Tail

There are a few dinosaurs that have been named as result of their tails.  Diplodocus is one such dinosaur*.  Under a number of caudal vertebrae (tail bones), there was a length of bone that played a role in strengthening the extraordinarily long tail (estimated to have exceeded fifteen metres in length in some specimens) and protecting blood vessels.  This is the “double beam” that gave Diplodocus its name.  The first Diplodocus fossils were found in Colorado and this Sauropod dinosaur was named and described by the great American palaeontologist Othniel Charles Marsh (1877).

This quadrupedal herbivore may have been known to science for nearly 140 years but we thought it time to add a new Diplodocus drawing to our database.  Just as “Dippy” is relocated from the main, central gallery at the Natural History Museum (London), so we have added a new representation of this Sauropod to our collection of illustrations.

* Cauditeryx (Tail Feather) is another, can you name a dinosaur named from its tail?

Dinosaur Drawings from Dinosaur Fans

Dinosaur Drawings from Dinosaur Fans

At Everything Dinosaur we get lots of letters, emails, pictures and drawings of prehistoric animals sent to our offices.  We read all our correspondence diligently and we also take the time to look at all the amazing illustrations and photographs we get sent.  All those correspondents that require a reply do get one from our enthusiastic team.  Below is a lovely picture of a early meat-eating dinosaur, whose fossils are known from north-western Argentina.  This is Herrerasaurus and the drawing comes from Eashwar from India.

An Illustration of Herrerasaurus

Herrerasaurus dinosaur drawing.

Herrerasaurus dinosaur drawing.

Picture Credit: Eashwar

A predator of riverbanks and floodplains of the Late Triassic, Herrerasaurus is one of the largest members of the Dinosauria known from this part of the super-continent of Pangaea.  It measured up to five metres in length.

We also received a super drawing of the Cretaceous Microraptor, a dinosaur from northern China that could probably fly.

A Drawing of Microraptor by Eashwar

A drawing of Microraptor

A drawing of Microraptor

Picture Credit: Eashwar

Microraptor (three species are known, all from Liaoning Province, China) was one of the smallest non-avian dinosaurs.  Various estimates for the length of this little dinosaur have been made, most of which suggest a length of between ninety centimetres and 1.2 metres, the majority of the length is made up of that impressive tail.

Thanks once again Eashwar for your drawings, we will post them up onto our social media pages, such as our Facebook page, Pinterest and Twitter feed.

Preparing for Plesiosuchus

Preparing for Plesiosuchus

Team members at Everything Dinosaur are busy making room in the warehouse for the imminent arrival of the first of the new prehistoric animal models from Safari Ltd.  The first two to arrive, (they are scheduled to be in stock at the Everything Dinosaur warehouse in about a fortnight), are the Plesiosuchus prehistoric crocodile model and the glyptodont replica Doedicurus.

Fact sheets have been prepared and drawings to illustrate these two prehistoric animals have already been completed.

The Illustration of the Jurassic Marine Crocodile Called Plesiosuchus

A scale drawing of the marine crocodile called Plesiosuchus.

A scale drawing of the marine crocodile called Plesiosuchus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of Safari Ltd prehistoric animal models including the increasingly rare Carnegie Collectibles: Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models from Safari Ltd

For every named prehistoric animal that Everything Dinosaur supplies, we research and write our own fact sheet on that animal.  Next year, with Safari Ltd models for 2016 in mind, we will be completing a fact sheet on the very toothsome Masiakasaurus, the other new for 2016 model that does not yet have a fact sheet available.

The Illustration of the Safari Doedicurus Prehistoric Mammal Model

Bizarre armoured giant with a furry underside, a shell on top and a bony tail often with a club on the end.

Bizarre armoured giant with a furry underside, a shell on top and a bony tail often with a club on the end.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above show the drawing we have prepared for the Doedicurus replica.  This is one very spiky prehistoric mammal.  We look forward to adding these two new prehistoric animal models to our inventory and naturally, when the models arrive we shall post up more pictures and such like on our social media.

Spinosaurus Drawing from Everything Dinosaur

Spinosaurus Illustration (2014)

With the imminent arrival of the new CollectA Spinosaurus replicas (1:40 Deluxe, Walking and Swimming dinosaur models), team members at Everything Dinosaur have been preparing a new illustration of this fearsome Theropod dinosaur.  Following a review of the fossil data carried out by Ibrahim et al in 2014, Spinosaurus (S. aegyptiacus) is now depicted as a quadruped (walking on all four legs).  Although this view is not accepted by all palaeontologists, the writers of the academic paper (published September 2014), portrayed the dinosaur widely regarded as the largest meat-eating dinosaur known to science, as an aquatic animal very much at home in the water.

Spinosaurus Illustration by Everything Dinosaur

The 2014 interpretation of Spinosaurus.

The 2014 interpretation of Spinosaurus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Much controversy surrounds this new interpretation, it certainly is a very intriguing concept, a Theropod dinosaur that evolved into a quadruped and took up an niche in the swampy, equatorial environment of Cretaceous northern Africa, that of a super-sized crocodilian.

To view the CollectA Deluxe Spinosaurus at Everything Dinosaur: CollectA Deluxe Prehistoric Animal Models

To view the not to scale Spinosaurus models from CollectA: CollectA Dinosaurs

The “Spinosaurus Re-boot” as it has been called, is going to be the focus of debate amongst vertebrate palaeontologists for some years to come, in the meantime, we can marvel at the new CollectA dinosaur models.

The full title of the autumn 2014 paper is “Semi-aquatic Adaptations in a Giant Predatory Dinosaur”, it was published in the academic journal “Science”.

List of authors: Nizar Ibrahim, Paul C. Sereno, Cristiano Dal Sasso, Simone Maganuco, Matteo Fabbri, David M. Martill, Samir Zouhri, Dawid A. Iurino and Nathan Myhrvold

Whatever the appearance and habits of Spinosaurus, it remains an extremely popular dinosaur amongst model collectors and dinosaur fans, peaking at number 2 in the annual Everything Dinosaur survey of the most popular prehistoric animals (2013 data).  It has featured in the top ten most popular prehistoric animals list as compiled by Everything Dinosaur for many years.

Dinosaur Fan Sends in Dinosaur Drawing

Everything Dinosaur Keeps Its Promises

Social media is a great way for customers to reach out and contact Everything Dinosaur.  We have a fairly active profile on Facebook, Pinterest and other social media platforms such as Twitter and Youtube.  Our team members do try to respond to all the questions, queries and enquires we get.  There are lots and lots each day, too many for us to count.  However, when Clare Hart, contacted us a few weeks ago to tell us all about her son and his fascination for dinosaurs we made a promise, if her son sent in a drawing of a dinosaur to us, we would post it up for him.

Sure enough, Clare has provided Everything Dinosaur with a lovely drawing of a meat-eating dinosaur created by her son Brandon.

Brandon’s Excellent Illustration of a Theropod Dinosaur

An interesting perspective and great care has been taken over the drawing.

An interesting perspective and great care has been taken over the drawing.

Picture Credit: Brandon Hart (age 12)

The illustration above shows an unusual view of a meat-eating dinosaur.  The picture gives the impression that the drawing has been made by looking from the side of the head back down the Theropod’s body.  Great care has been taken to show the different type of skin patterns that have been seen in fossil Theropods.  The large fenestra (opening) in front of the eye socket has been depicted and from the overall appearance and those crests over the orbit (eye socket), we would suggest that this drawing represents a member of the Superfamily Allosauroidea.  There are a lot of dinosaurs within this particularly Superfamily, but this could be a drawing of an Allosaurus (Allosaurus fragilis), nicknamed by many palaeontologists as the “lion of the Jurassic”.

A Typical Model of an Allosaurus

A Papo Allosaurus dinosaur model.

A Papo Allosaurus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Allosaurus was a formidable predator, amongst the largest known from rocks that date from the Upper Jurassic. Brandon’s dinosaur has a row of dermal spines running down the animal’s “s-shaped” neck, this type of ornamentation is seen in a number of illustrations of this meat-eating dinosaur.

Commenting on the artwork of twelve year-old Brandon, a spokesperson from Everything Dinosaur stated:

“This is an excellent piece of artwork, a wonderful drawing of a carnivorous dinosaur.  The illustration shows lots of detail and obviously a great deal of care has been taken by young Brandon.”

Ironically, in this digital age when a mobile phone can incorporate a camera capable of taking exquisitely detailed photographs, scientific illustration remains very important.  Tutors used to tell us that the best way to get to know a fossil is to draw it.  Pencil sketches can help to reveal details and minute features not immediately obvious.  Recently, Everything Dinosaur team members have been looking at drawings from the 19th Century that illustrate fossil finds from southern England.  It seems that with Brandon’s carefully drawn dinosaur, the future of scientific illustration is in safe hands.

We made a promise that if Clare sent us a drawing done by her son we would post it up.  We like to keep our promises.

Well done, Brandon!

Preparing for a Trip to the Jurassic

Going on a Trip to the Jurassic

As part of Everything Dinosaur’s summer school commitments team members have spent the day preparing for trip into the east Midlands to help a group of Key Stage two children explore fossils.  Our plan is to set up in the school an artificial beach and to populate it with various fossils from our recent digs and field work.  Most of the fossils we will be using come from marine sediments and consist of lots of invertebrates, although there is some fossilised wood and even shark teeth.  Over the last year or so, we have been involved in a number of trips to explore highly fossiliferous sediments and as a result we have plenty of fossils to use in this fossils and dinosaur workshop session.

Lots of Fossils “on hand”

A successful fossil hunt.

A successful fossil hunt.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

It is going to be a dinosaur workshop with a difference.  Having populated the beach with various fossils, we are going to challenge the children to find them.  What they find they can keep, so long as the mums, dads and teachers present are OK with this.  In addition, we will be challenging the children to help us with some fossil identification.  This will involve lots of tactile fossil handling and helping them with their reading and writing.

We have also created a range of drawing materials so that the children can take home a drawing to colour in depicting what life was like in their part of the world during the Middle Jurassic.

A “Jurassic World”

Life in the Jurassic Seas.

Life in the Jurassic Seas.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture we have created is a composition consisting of many of the illustrations of Jurassic marine fauna we have stored in our database.  The drawing materials reflect the sort of fossils that the children will be able to discover on our artificial beach. There will be fragments of coral, bivalve shells, including some nice examples of “devil’s toenails” – Gryphaea.  As well as the various bivalves, there are Belemnite guards to find and pieces of fossilised Ammonite shell.  We have gastropods, fish scales, crinoids (sea lilies) and lots of lovely brachiopods, especially those that superficially resemble old lamps (often referred to as lampshells).

It should be a fun dinosaur workshop with lots of fossils to collect and to identify.

Thank You for All the Dinosaur Pictures

Lots of Dinosaur Pictures Sent to Everything Dinosaur

Just time to say a very big thank you to all the dinosaur fans and budding fossil collectors that have sent in prehistoric animal pictures.  We do look at every single one that we receive and we are humbled when we get so many sent into us.  We know that a lot of schools have been teaching dinosaur themed topics during the latter part of the spring term and for the first part of the summer term, as a result, we have been very busy visiting schools and we have seen some wonderful examples of artwork as well as inspiring the next generation of palaeoartists to send in their pictures to Everything Dinosaur.

A Pink Stegosaurus (Very Colourful)

A very colourful pink plant-eating dinosaur.

A very colourful pink plant-eating dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Enan

We have posted up a large number of the illustrations on our warehouse notice boards, others have been put up on the office walls, they certainly cheer the place up.  Lots and lots of brightly coloured prehistoric animals such as this very pink Stegosaurus drawn by Enan, aged 4.  His mum says that Stegosaurus is his favourite dinosaur (for the moment), but he does tend to change quite frequently and he likes to tell his parents about his dinosaur models and to explain which ones ate plants and which ones ate meat.  Well done, Enan.

Hopefully, we will have time to post up more examples, on our social media pages and of course on the Everything Dinosaur blog.

Wonderful Dinosaur Illustrations from India

Young Fans Send in their Dinosaur Drawings to Everything Dinosaur

It is always a pleasure to receive drawings of prehistoric animals from fans of dinosaurs.  We get lots and lots sent into our offices from all over the world.  We are always pleased to receive these illustrations and it amazes us how diverse the drawings are.  Dinosaurs dominate, but we get pictures of Ichthyosaurs, Pterosaurs as well as artwork depicting scenes from the Palaeozoic as well as the Mesozoic.  In addition, our post bags and emails also contain drawings of prehistoric mammals, Woolly Mammoths and Sabre-Toothed Cats being particularly popular.

Here are some examples sent in to Everything Dinosaur from India.

A Drawing of the Fearsome Carnivore Giganotosaurus

A colourful dinosaur drawing from India.

A colourful dinosaur drawing from India.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

The illustrator has correctly stated that the name Giganotosaurus means “giant southern lizard”.  We have printed out this artwork and pinned it onto one of our warehouse walls, so that everyone in the company can see when they are in the warehouse looking for dinosaur toys and games.

A Rearing Sauropod Defends Itself from Attack

A rearing Sauropod.

A rearing Sauropod.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

Another interesting drawing, one depicting a fight between two dinosaurs.  The green, long-necked dinosaur reminds us of the “Rearing Diplodocus” model in the Collecta not-to-scale model range.

The Collecta Rearing Diplodocus Dinosaur Model

Model was introduced in 2013.

Model was introduced in 2013.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We really enjoy viewing all the wonderful prehistoric animal drawings that get sent into our offices, the one below shows an illustration of the huge, fish-eating dinosaur known as Spinosaurus, (thanks for this Shivesh).

A Drawing of the Mighty Spinosaurus

A fantastic drawing Shivesh!

A fantastic drawing Shivesh!

Picture Credit: Shivesh

When it comes to the dinosaurs, we tend to get a lot of pictures showing carnivorous dinosaurs, including the likes of Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus rex.  We have posted up a wonderful drawing of a meat-eating dinosaur, this time coloured predominately sky blue.

Dinosaur Drawings in November (Dinovember)

Fearsome Theropod dinosaur.

Fearsome Theropod dinosaur.

Picture Credit: M. V. Eashwar

The dinosaur in the picture above seems to be on the prowl, perhaps it is stalking potential prey.  We at Everything Dinosaur really enjoy seeing all these wonderful prehistoric animal illustrations.  Our thanks to all the budding, young (and not so young), palaeoartists that take the time and trouble to send them into us.

Thanks.

Two Hundred Years of Ichthyosaurs

200th Anniversary of the First Ichthyosaur Scientific Paper

This week saw the 200th anniversary of the first scientific description of an animal that was later named as an Ichthyosaur.  On June 23rd 1814, Sir Everard Home published the first account of the Lyme Regis Ichthyosaur that had been found a few years earlier by the Anning family (Mary and her brother Joseph).  The paper was published by the Royal Society of London, it had the catchy title of “Some Account of the Fossil Remains of an Animal More Nearly Allied to Fishes than any Other Classes of Animals”.

In the account, Sir Everard Home, an anatomist who held the distinguished position of Surgeon to the King, attempted to classify the fossilised remains of what we now know as a “Fish Lizard”.  Reading the paper today, one can’t help but get a sense of utter confusion in the mind of the author.  Sir Everard, had one or two secrets and although two hundred years later, it is difficult to place in context what was behind the paper, after all, at the height of the Napoleonic war there was intense rivalry between the French and English scientific establishments, an assessment of this work in 2014 does little to enhance Sir Everard’s academic reputation.

A Model of an Ichthyosaur and One of the Plate Illustrations from the Scientific Paper

The illustration from the paper and a model interpretation of a "Fish Lizard"

The illustration from the paper and a model interpretation of a “Fish Lizard”

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd top and the Royal Society (William Clift) bottom

Back to those secrets.  Whilst notable figures in the history of palaeontology such as the Reverend William Buckland was corresponding with Georges Cuvier, the French anatomist and widely regarded as “the founder of modern comparative anatomy”, against a back drop of war between Britain and France, in a bid to understand the strange petrified remains found on England’s Dorset coast, Sir Everard raced into print, to be the first to describe this creature.  Just like today, if you are the first to do something than fame and fortune can await.  Trouble is, Sir Everard, by a number of accounts, was relatively incompetent.  He was also a cheat!

In 1771, when the young Everard was a teenager, his sister married John Hunter, an extremely talented surgeon and anatomist who had already built a reputation for himself as being one of the most brilliant scientists of his day.  He was able to learn a great deal from his brother-in-law and this coupled with his wealthy background soon propelled the ambitious Everard to the forefront of London society.  However, the much older John Hunter died suddenly from a heart attack in 1793 and it has been said that Everard used his brother-in-laws untimely death to his distinct advantage.

Having removed  “a cartload” of John Hunter’s unpublished manuscripts from the Royal College of Surgeons in London, Everard began publishing them but under his own name.  This alleged plagiarism enhanced the young surgeon’s reputation and led to his steady rise in scientific circles, permitting Everard to gain the fame and good standing amongst his peers that he so craved.  Such was his desire to keep his plagiarism a secret, that it is believed that he burnt Hunter’s original texts once they had been copied out.  So enthusiastic was he to get rid of the evidence that on one occasion he set fire to his own house.

And so to the published account of the Ichthyosaur.  Sir Everard explained his willingness to examine the fossilised remains by writing:

“To examine such fossil bones, and to determine the class to which the animals belonged comes within the sphere of enquiry of the anatomist.”

In the paper, Sir Everard describes the fossil remains in some detail, although his descriptions lack the academic rigour found in other papers later published by Cuvier, Mantell and Owen.  The author states that the fossil material was found in the Blue Lias of the Dorset coast between Charmouth and Lyme Regis, the fossil discovery having been made after a cliff fall.  The paper claims that the skull was found in 1812 with other fossils relating to this specimen found the following year.  The role played by the Annings in this discovery is not mentioned by Home.  This assertion itself, may be inaccurate.  Many accounts suggest it was Joseph Anning who found the four foot long skull in 1811, as to whether Mary was present at the time, we at Everything Dinosaur remain uncertain.  Although Mary and Joseph together are credited by many sources for finding other fossil bones related to this specimen in 1812.

The potential mix up in dates, pales when the rest of Sir Everard’s paper is reviewed.  At first, the idea that these bones represent some form of ancient crocodile is favoured.  Embryonic teeth ready to replace already emerged teeth were noticed.  However, to test this theory one of the conical fossil teeth was split open.  He mistook evidence for an embryonic tooth ready to replace a broken tooth in the jaw as an accumulation of calcite and hence, Everard wrongly concluded that this creature was not a reptile.  The sclerotic ring of bone around the eye reminded the anatomist of the eye of a fish, but when the plates were counted that make up this ring of bone (13), he commented that the fossil may have affinities with the bird family as this number of bones is found only in eyes of birds.

The position of the nostrils and the shape of the lower jaw is considered to be very like those seen in fish.  The freshwater Pike is mentioned, although there are other parts of the skeleton that seem to confuse Sir Everard still further.  The shoulder blades both in their shape and size are reported as being similar to those found in crocodiles, part of the fossil material is even compared to the bones of a turtle.

One of the Illustrative Plates from the Original Paper

One of the illustrations by William Clift.

One of the illustrations by William Clift.

Paper Credit: Royal Society (William Clift)

The paper concludes by stating:

“These particulars, in which the bones of this animal differ from those of fishes, are sufficient to show that although the mode of its progressive motion has induced me to place it in that class, I by no means consider it wholly a fish, when compared with other fishes, but rather view it in a similar light to those animals met with in New South Wales, which appear to be so many deviations from ordinary structure, for the purpose of making intermediate connecting links, to unite in the closest manner the classes of which the great chain of animated beings is composed.”

Our baffled author had described a few years early the Duck-billed Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) after specimens were brought back from eastern Australia.  Sir Everard is referring to the Platypus when he writes of “those animals met with in New South Wales”.

Much of the French scientific establishment (and a significant number of British scientists) pilloried this paper.  The difference being, the French who were at war could do it openly, however, in Britain, such was the power and influence of Sir Everard Home, no one dared challenge his assumptions openly.

It was perhaps because of Sir Everard’s influence and strong standing within the Royal Society, that the Reverend William Buckland along with the Reverend Coneybeare supported by up and coming geologists such as Henry de la Beche published a rival scientific paper on the Annings’s discovery in the journals of the Geological Society.  This paper correctly identified that the fossils were reptilian.

Sir Everard, although ridiculed by other academics continued to work on the puzzling Ichthyosaur specimens.  Five years after his 1814 paper, he thought he had finally solved the mystery as to this strange creature’s anatomical classification.  A new vertebrate to science, referred to as a “Proteus” had been described by a Viennese doctor some years earlier.  This was a blind, amphibian of the salamander family (Proteus anguinus) that lived in freshwater streams and lakes deep in caves.  Sir Everard mistakenly concluded that the Lyme Regis fossils were a link between the strange Proteus and modern lizards.  From then on he referred to the 1814 specimen as a “Proteosaurus”.  However, this name never was accepted by scientific circles as the moniker Ichthyosaurus (Fish Lizard) had been erected a year earlier by Charles Konig of the British Museum where the Ichthyosaur specimen resided.

Ironically, as our knowledge of the Ichthyosaur Order has grown over the years, so the Lyme Regis specimen has been renamed.  It is no longer regarded as an Ichthyosaurus, as the fossils indicate a creature more than five metres in length, much larger than those animals that make up the Ichthyosaurus genus today.  In the late 1880’s it was renamed Temnodontosaurus (cutting tooth lizard).  The Lyme Regis specimen, studied all those years earlier by Sir Everard Home, was named the type specimen with the species name Temnodontosaurus platyodon.

A Close up of the Head of a Typical Ichthyosaur

An Icththyosaurus with an Ammonite that it has caught.

An Ichthyosaurus with an Ammonite that it has caught.

Picture Credit: Safari Ltd

The 1814 paper might say more about the petty rivalries and snobbery that dogged British scientific circles than it adds to our knowledge of the Ichthyosauria.  However, there is one final point to be made.  Accompanying the notes were brilliant illustrations of the fossil material, carefully and skilfully prepared by the naturalist William Clift.  The child of a poor family from Devon, William had shown a talent for art from a young age.  His illustrative skills were noticed by one of the local gentry, a Colonel whose wife happened to know Anne Home, the sister of Everard who had married John Hunter.  When John Hunter was looking for an apprentice to help classify and catalogue his growing collection of specimens at the Royal College of Surgeons, Clift was recommended.  He quickly rose to prominence and despite being hampered by the removal of many of John Hunter’s manuscripts by Everard, Clift’s reputation grew and grew.  His daughter, Caroline Ameila Clift married Professor Richard Owen (later Sir Richard Owen), the anatomist who is credited with the naming of the dinosaur Order and the establishment of the Natural History Museum in London.

Download a Dinosaur Drawing from Everything Dinosaur

Dinosaur Drawing Materials from Everything Dinosaur

As the Easter break is approaching, team members at Everything Dinosaur thought it would be a good idea if we created a dinosaur picture that young fans of dinosaurs and prehistoric animals could colour in.  The picture we have created shows  a scene from the Cretaceous geological period.  A brave Psittacosaurus is defending its nest which contains two baby dinosaurs from the attentions of an attacking Oviraptor.  In the background a large Pterosaur can be seen flying in the distance.

Dinosaur Drawings Available from Everything Dinosaur

Free dinosaur drawings available from Everything Dinosaur.

Free dinosaur drawings available from Everything Dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Oviraptors have been in the news recently with the naming of a new species of North American Oviraptor (Anzu wyliei).

If you would like to request this image as a download so that your young dinosaur fan can colour it in, simply email Everything Dinosaur and one of our team members will send you the drawing.

Email Everything Dinosaur: Contact Us

Staypressed theme by Themocracy