Category: Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Drawings

Updating the Deinocheirus Fact Sheet

Deinocheirus Fact Sheet is Updated

One of the wonderful things about vertebrate palaeontology is that ideas about prehistoric animals are changing all the time.  Fossil discoveries and new research often challenges existing assumptions leading to a revision of data.  Model making companies often reflect the changing views about a long extinct animal by introducing a new version of that animal to their prehistoric animal model portfolio.  CollectA for example, recently introduced a new model of the bizarre Late Cretaceous Theropod Deinocheirus (D. mirificus).  In addition, CollectA will be bringing out a new Deluxe version of Deinocheirus in 2017.  This means, that for Everything Dinosaur team members, there is a need to update and revise the company’s Deinocheirus fact sheet.

The New Scale Drawing of Deinocheirus from Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus mirificus scale drawing.

A scale drawing of Deinocheirus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Deinocheirus – Taller than a Lamppost!

Thanks to two new fossil discoveries (a sub-adult found in 2006 and the fossils of a much larger individual discovered in 2009), palaeontologists have a much better idea about what this giant ornithomimid looked like.  As a result, further changes to the Everything Dinosaur fact sheet have been made.  In the original data sheet, prepared in 2012, prior to the scientific paper providing the new description, it was stated that the known fossils ascribed to Deinocheirus represented one of the largest Theropods from Asia.  This remains true, however, an assessment of the fossilised bones of the individual found in 2009, including a humerus six centimetres longer than the holotype, indicate that Deinocheirus reached a length of around eleven metres.  Subsequent study of the strongly reinforced pelvis and the robust hind limbs have led palaeontologists to reconsider how heavy this animal might have been.  It probably had a narrower stance than the pot-bellied Therizinosaurs, but scientists estimate that Deinocheirus might have weighed as much as six tonnes and it would have stood around five metres tall.

The New for 2017 CollectA Deluxe 1:40 Scale Deinocheirus Replica

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus model.

The CollectA 1:40 scale Deluxe Deinocheirus dinosaur model.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

We look forward to the arrival of the new CollectA Deluxe 1:40 scale Deinocheirus replica and the other exciting new models to be added to CollectA’s “Prehistoric Life” model range.

To read more about the new CollectA Deluxe Deinocheirus: New CollectA Models for 2017 (part 2)

A Drawing of Regaliceratops

A Drawing of Regaliceratops

As Everything Dinosaur prepares for the arrival of the first of the new for 2017 prehistoric animal models from CollectA, which are due to arrive in the first quarter next year, team members have been busy preparing fact sheets to accompany the new models.  When fact sheets are prepared, illustrations of the prehistoric animal featured are required, below is the drawing that will be used to illustrate the fact sheet all about the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

A Drawing of the Horned Dinosaur Regaliceratops

Regaliceratops drawing.

A drawing of the horned dinosaur Regaliceratops.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Regaliceratops peterhewsi

Geologist Peter Hews discovered a large fossilised skull in strata estimated to be around 68 million years old back in 2005.  The fossil material consisted of a substantial amount of the skull, some elements were missing such as the dentary (lower jaw) and the rostral bone, although the majority of the skull bones were present.  The fossil came from the St Mary River Formation exposures of south-western Alberta (Canada).  The genus name honours the Royal Tyrrell Museum (Drumheller, Alberta) as well as giving a nod to that flamboyant crown-like bony frill.  The specific epithet honours the discoverer of the holotype fossil material as well as giving recognition the geologist’s contribution to the study of the St Mary River Formation.

To read Everything Dinosaur’s 2015 article about the naming of this Late Cretaceous dinosaur: Regaliceratops – A Right Royal Rumble

For an article on the new for 2017 CollectA Regaliceratops dinosaur model: New CollectA Models for 2017 (Part 2)

Stylish Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus albertensis

With the introduction of the Deluxe Styracosaurus replica by our chums at CollectA, (due out in early 2017), Everything Dinosaur has taken this opportunity to commission a new Styracosaurus illustration to be used on the company’s Styracosaurus fact sheet.  Our new illustration updates the existing drawing and gives Styracosaurus a row of bristle-like structures, running down from the hip towards the end of the tail, a feature inferred from a number of ceratopsid specimens but not confirmed (as far as we know), from the fossil record of the Styracosaurus genus.

Styracosaurus Illustrated

Styracosaurus illustrated.

A drawing of the horned dinosaur Styracosaurus.

Picture Credit: Mike Fredericks/Everything Dinosaur

Illustrating Dinosaurs – The Role of Palaeoartists

Whilst working in a school the other day, one of our dinosaur and fossil experts was approached by a member of staff and asked questions about a career in palaeontology.  Their son is very keen on dinosaurs and would like to be a palaeontologist.  Our fossil expert briefly outlined some of the numerous career paths available, including the role of illustrator.  The boy is quite keen on drawing and loves drawing prehistoric animals, perhaps one day he will be able to combine his interest in dinosaurs and art and have a career as a palaeoartist.  Scientific illustration is a very competitive area, however, as new dinosaur discoveries are made, the scientific community often relies on the skills of artists to bring the fossilised remains to life and create an illustration of the animal as it probably looked.

We hope you like the Styracosaurus (S. albertensis) illustration, it will feature on our soon to be revised Styracosaurus fact sheet that is sent out with purchases of Styracosaurus models and replicas.

Batrachotomus – A Fearsome Triassic Predator

Batrachotomus kupferzellensis

An email from a young fan of prehistoric animals listed their favourite non-dinosaurs.  Top of the list was the formidable Triassic carnivore Batrachotomus, fossils of which have been found in Germany.  Batrachotomus was not a dinosaur, (a point made in the email by the aspiring junior scientist who contacted Everything Dinosaur), but it was a member of the same clade of diapsid reptiles, the Archosaurs (Archosauria).  Roughly the size of a modern saltwater crocodile, this terrestrial predator was one of the largest carnivores known from the Middle and Late Triassic of Europe.

In the email, a fact sheet about Batrachotomus was requested, we duly obliged and we also emailed over some drawing materials of Triassic reptiles, including a scale drawing of Batrachotomus for this young person to colour in.

Everything Dinosaur’s Illustration of Batrachotomus

Batrachotomus drawing.

A scale drawing of the Triassic reptile Batrachotomus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Fossils ascribed to this genus have been found at several locations in southern Germany.  The first fossils were discovered in 1977, although it was not named and scientifically described until 1999.

A Pack of “Raptors” Attack Tenontosaurus

Deinonychus Pack Attacks Tenontosaurus

Our thanks to Thomas, a very knowledgeable and keen dinosaur fan who sent into Everything Dinosaur a couple of illustrations of prehistoric animals earlier this week.  One of the drawings featured a trio of Deinonychus dinosaurs battling with a hapless Ornithopod (Tenontosaurus).  Deinonychus (D. antirrhopus) was formally described by the highly influential John Ostrom in 1969.  Depicted as an agile, highly active predator, Ostrom championed the idea that dinosaurs were very different from the cold-blooded reptiles of today.  Ostrom’s interpretation of Deinonychus was of an aggressive, lightly built biped with wonderful balance and a great turn of speed.  Unfortunate herbivores had to face fearsome jaws lined with sharp teeth and that highly curved, killing toe-claw that in larger animals was around thirteen centimetres long.  A number of Deinonychus fossils have been found in association with the herbivorous dinosaur Tenontosaurus (T. tillettorum).  The close proximity of predator and potential prey in the fossil record has been interpreted as evidence that Deinonychus packs hunted and killed Tenontosaurus.

The “Raptor” Attack Drawing by Thomas

 A pack of Deinonychus attack Tenontosaurus.

A trio of “raptors” attacking a Tenontosaurus dinosaur.

Picture Credit: Thomas

It’s a great picture Thomas and we appreciate you drawing the Deinonychus dinosaurs as feathered dinosaurs!  Several famous artists and illustrators have been inspired by the close affinity between the fossils of Tenontosaurus and Deinonychus and they have produced amazing illustrations of an encounter between these two types of prehistoric animal.  Perhaps, one of the most famous of these illustrations was created by the renowned British palaeoartist John Sibbick.

Deinonychus and Tenontosaurus Encounter

Deinonychus attacking Tenontosaurus.

A pack of Deinonychus attacking the herbivore Tenontosaurus.

Picture Credit: John Sibbick

The John Sibbick artwork was originally commissioned by the London Natural History, at a time when the idea of feathered members of the Dromaeosauridae was still controversial.  Over the years, we at Everything Dinosaur have seen lots of Deinonychus attacking Tenontosaurus illustrations, our congratulations to Thomas for his wonderful pencil drawing.  Ironically, Everything Dinosaur and Rebor are going to have a trio of Deinonychus figures available soon to compliment the Rebor 1:35 scale Acrocanthosaurus (Hercules) and the Tenontosaurus tillettorum (Ceryneian Hind) diorama.

One of the Trio of Deinonychus Figures for the Rebor Dinosaur Diorama

Rebor Deinonychus model.

An early image of one of the Deinonychus replicas from Rebor. (Cerberus Clan).

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The set of three Deinonychus models the “Cerberus Clan”, was originally scheduled to go on sale from Everything Dinosaur in November, however, it is likely that these models will not arrive until the middle of December.  We will post up more details about these 1:35 scale dinosaurs in due course.

Our thanks once again to Thomas for his fabulous drawings.

Dinosaur Drawing from India

Dinosaur Fan Sends in Dinosaur Drawing

Our thanks to Eashwar from India who sent into Everything Dinosaur’s offices another dinosaur drawing.  Eashwar emailed us a picture of Hypoendocrine rex, a mutant tyrannosaurid from the virtual reality prehistoric animal themed game “The Isle”.

Eashwar’s Mutant Tyrannosaur Drawing

Mutant tyrannosaurid.

Hypoendocrine T. rex drawing.

Picture Credit: M.V. Eashwar

The Isle Game

The Isle is a substantial, multi-player platform created by a group of veteran gaming developers (which we think are based in the United States).  Team members at Everything Dinosaur are not that familiar with this particular platform but the island is inhabited by a large number of mutant dinosaurs including a Hypoendocrine T. rex.

Our thanks to M. V. Eashwar for sending in his mutant tyrannosaurid drawing.

Max and His Drawing of the Cambrian

Max and his Anomalocaris Drawing

Our thanks to Max and his mum for sending us a wonderful thank you letter after we furnished him with twenty-two prehistoric animal fact sheets to add to his dinosaur database.  Max very kindly provided us with a drawing of a scene from the Cambrian, a geological period that lasted some fifty-four million years or so (542 to 488 million years ago).  The Cambrian marks the appearance of sophisticated marine ecosystems and a rapid radiation and diversification of marine life-forms.  It is the first geological period of the Phanerozoic Eon, an Eon that continues today (visible life).  We really appreciate Max’s illustration, it’s a super drawing of a Cambrian scene.

The Cambrian Scene Sent to Everything Dinosaur by Young Max

Life in the Cambrian by Max.

A drawing of Cambrian marine life by young Max.

Picture Credit: Max

At Everything Dinosaur we get sent lots of pictures of dinosaurs, some amazing drawings as well as snapshots of fossil finds.  We don’t get too many drawings illustrating life in the shallow seas of the world some 510 million years ago.  A special thank you to Max and his mum for sending this into us.

Featuring  Anomalocaris

The animal featured in the centre of Max’s drawing looks like an Anomalocaris.  Although, it was probably not the fastest swimmer, Anomalocaris was probably the apex predator in the shallow sea fauna represented by the fossils from the Burgess Shale of British Columbia.  At more than a seventy centimetres in length, Anomalocaris was probably the largest member of the Burgess Shale biota.

The Drawing by Max Compared to a Scientific Illustration of Anomalocaris

Anomalocaris comparison.

A comparison between a child’s drawing and a scientific illustration of Anomalocaris.

Picture Credit: Max and Everything Dinosaur

We can certainly see a resemblance between the two drawings.  It had been thought that the anomalocarids had become extinct at the end of the Cambrian, but a study of Ordovician fossils from Morocco provided a surprise for palaeontologists.   It seems these types of marine creatures, which might be the ancestors of today’s velvet worms, lived for at least thirty million years longer, and what is more, some kinds actually grew even bigger than their Cambrian counterparts.

To read more about this: Anomalocarids into the Ordovician

Everything Dinosaur enjoys receiving drawings such as the one Max sent into us, especially ones that illustrate scenes from very dramatic times in the evolution of life on our planet, such as the Cambrian.  Our thanks to Max once again for sending in his picture.

Adding Another Diplodocus Drawing to our Portfolio

Everything Dinosaur Adds Another Diplodocus

There are a number of species assigned to the Diplodocus genus, at least three, but potentially there may be several more (nomen dubium, Seismosaurus and Amphicoelias notwithstanding).  Everything Dinosaur has commissioned almost as many Diplodocus illustrations as there were potential species.   Our latest Diplodocus drawing is going to be used in several projects including within an updated Diplodocus fact sheet (Diplodocus longus).

Everything Dinosaur’s Illustration of Diplodocus (D. longus)

A drawing of Diplodocus.

A drawing of Diplodocus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

Named As a Result of Its Tail

There are a few dinosaurs that have been named as result of their tails.  Diplodocus is one such dinosaur*.  Under a number of caudal vertebrae (tail bones), there was a length of bone that played a role in strengthening the extraordinarily long tail (estimated to have exceeded fifteen metres in length in some specimens) and protecting blood vessels.  This is the “double beam” that gave Diplodocus its name.  The first Diplodocus fossils were found in Colorado and this Sauropod dinosaur was named and described by the great American palaeontologist Othniel Charles Marsh (1877).

This quadrupedal herbivore may have been known to science for nearly 140 years but we thought it time to add a new Diplodocus drawing to our database.  Just as “Dippy” is relocated from the main, central gallery at the Natural History Museum (London), so we have added a new representation of this Sauropod to our collection of illustrations.

* Cauditeryx (Tail Feather) is another, can you name a dinosaur named from its tail?

Dinosaur Drawings from Dinosaur Fans

Dinosaur Drawings from Dinosaur Fans

At Everything Dinosaur we get lots of letters, emails, pictures and drawings of prehistoric animals sent to our offices.  We read all our correspondence diligently and we also take the time to look at all the amazing illustrations and photographs we get sent.  All those correspondents that require a reply do get one from our enthusiastic team.  Below is a lovely picture of a early meat-eating dinosaur, whose fossils are known from north-western Argentina.  This is Herrerasaurus and the drawing comes from Eashwar from India.

An Illustration of Herrerasaurus

Herrerasaurus dinosaur drawing.

Herrerasaurus dinosaur drawing.

Picture Credit: Eashwar

A predator of riverbanks and floodplains of the Late Triassic, Herrerasaurus is one of the largest members of the Dinosauria known from this part of the super-continent of Pangaea.  It measured up to five metres in length.

We also received a super drawing of the Cretaceous Microraptor, a dinosaur from northern China that could probably fly.

A Drawing of Microraptor by Eashwar

A drawing of Microraptor

A drawing of Microraptor

Picture Credit: Eashwar

Microraptor (three species are known, all from Liaoning Province, China) was one of the smallest non-avian dinosaurs.  Various estimates for the length of this little dinosaur have been made, most of which suggest a length of between ninety centimetres and 1.2 metres, the majority of the length is made up of that impressive tail.

Thanks once again Eashwar for your drawings, we will post them up onto our social media pages, such as our Facebook page, Pinterest and Twitter feed.

Preparing for Plesiosuchus

Preparing for Plesiosuchus

Team members at Everything Dinosaur are busy making room in the warehouse for the imminent arrival of the first of the new prehistoric animal models from Safari Ltd.  The first two to arrive, (they are scheduled to be in stock at the Everything Dinosaur warehouse in about a fortnight), are the Plesiosuchus prehistoric crocodile model and the glyptodont replica Doedicurus.

Fact sheets have been prepared and drawings to illustrate these two prehistoric animals have already been completed.

The Illustration of the Jurassic Marine Crocodile Called Plesiosuchus

A scale drawing of the marine crocodile called Plesiosuchus.

A scale drawing of the marine crocodile called Plesiosuchus.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

To view Everything Dinosaur’s range of Safari Ltd prehistoric animal models including the increasingly rare Carnegie Collectibles: Dinosaur and Prehistoric Animal Models from Safari Ltd

For every named prehistoric animal that Everything Dinosaur supplies, we research and write our own fact sheet on that animal.  Next year, with Safari Ltd models for 2016 in mind, we will be completing a fact sheet on the very toothsome Masiakasaurus, the other new for 2016 model that does not yet have a fact sheet available.

The Illustration of the Safari Doedicurus Prehistoric Mammal Model

Bizarre armoured giant with a furry underside, a shell on top and a bony tail often with a club on the end.

Bizarre armoured giant with a furry underside, a shell on top and a bony tail often with a club on the end.

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

The picture above show the drawing we have prepared for the Doedicurus replica.  This is one very spiky prehistoric mammal.  We look forward to adding these two new prehistoric animal models to our inventory and naturally, when the models arrive we shall post up more pictures and such like on our social media.

Staypressed theme by Themocracy