Guinness World Records Book – Reviewed

Team members at Everything Dinosaur have a new pastime, during their breaks they consult the Guinness World Records Book (2012 edition) and test each other on their knowledge on an amazing array of subjects from the moons of Jupiter to the shortest bird migration via trying to guess the country with the largest oil consumption.

The Guinness World Records book is absolutely stuffed full of astonishing facts, feats and statistics, if there is an area of human endeavour, an aspect of the natural world – animal, vegetable or mineral it seems that somebody, somewhere, holds a record and the Guinness team have set about compiling a immense compendium cataloguing it all.

The Guinness Book of Records 2012

Super Christmas Present Idea

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

With an eye on the London Olympics there is a special section within that part of the book concerning sports, dedicated to the Olympic movement and London 2012.  The London Olympics Icon launched in June 2007 and designed by Wolff Olins is the most expensive Olympic logo ever costing £400,000 to design.  In Beijing (2008) there were the most participants at an Olympics, these games attracted a record 10,942 athletes from 204 countries.

Royalty, juggling feats, fantastic voyages, apex predators, asteroids, peculiar plants, maps, giant spiders, climate, prehistoric whales – just about everything we could think of is featured somewhere in the 288, jam-packed pages.  To read about “Cassius” the largest Saltwater crocodile in captivity turn to page 46 – we wrote a web log article about this particular specimen of Crocodylus porosus in this web log a few weeks ago, to see this article click on the link below:

Saltwater Crocodile breaks record: Which was the largest crocodile of all time?

With more than 1,000,00 world record holders and some 4,000 new, updated and classic world records this book makes a super Christmas present and a very enjoyable read for all the family.

Share This!Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0