Edmontosaurus Model (Safari Ltd) Review

The amazing three Tyrannosaur exhibition mount at the newly refurbished Los Angeles County Museum features an Edmontosaurus as well.  Alongside the T. rex nick-named “Thomas” and his/her chums there is the fossil of an Edmontosaurus, a duck-billed dinosaur.  This exciting diorama shows three Tyrannosaur skeletons all different ages, a two-year old, an animal that died aged perhaps thirteen years old and the biggest specimen represents a T. rex in its late teens.  The Edmontosaurus is depicted as the victim, it is the corpse upon which these Tyrannosaurs are about to feast in the L. A. Museum’s scenario.

Whilst there are a number of Edmontosaurus fossils that suggest that this four tonne herbivore was part of a Tyrannosaurus rex diet, we think that it is time for Edmontosaurus to step into the spotlight and to be given some attention.  After all, as one of the last dinosaurs to evolve, it was very big for a Hadrosaur and as a genus it was extremely widespread and if the Late Cretaceous fossil record of North America is anything to go by it was very numerous, roaming what was to become Alaska, Alberta, and Montana in huge herds.

The introduction of a new Edmontosaurus replica into the Wild Safari Dinos model range (Safari Ltd) gave us the chance to make a video review featuring Edmontosaurus.

Everything Dinosaur’s Review of Edmontosaurus (Safari Ltd)

Video credit: Everything Dinosaur

In this video, we use this new model to highlight some of the knowledge that palaeontologists have been able to build up based on the extensive Edmontosaurus fossil material.  We discuss why the model has been painted the way that it has, how the hooves and skin have been depicted and reflect on the interaction between this Ornithopod and T. rex with whom it shared its environment.

To view the range of Safari Ltd’s dinosaur models including the Wild Safari Dinos Edmontosaurus: Dinosaur Toys – Dinosaur Models

We go on to explain why Edmontosaurus was chosen as the “victim” for the three T. rex exhibit at the L. A. Museum and provide answers to the question as to why this model has such a deep tail – enjoy.

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