Wargamers opt for Scutosaurus

Often the introduction of a new model from a manufacturer can have unforeseen consequences.  Many new models find themselves helping to illuminate an information point at a museum display.  It is always helpful to see an accurate scale model of the animal whose fossilised bones are featured in the glass case.  A model can help bring an exhibit alive and help visitors to picture the animal as it would have looked like.

However, the introduction of the Scutosaurus model, part of the Safari Carnegie Wild Dinos series has proved to be a surprising hit with one particular group of hobby fans – wargamers.

Scutosaurus was a large, heavily armoured plant-eating reptile that lived before the first dinosaurs evolved.  It was a member of the Pareiasauridae, a group of parareptiles that included a variety of forms, most were small and lizard-like, others evolved into giants with huge tusks, horns and dermal armour.  Scutosaurus was one of the largest, living in the Late Permian of northern Europe.  At nearly 3 metres long and weighing an estimated 1,000 kilos, it was at the time one of the largest land animals that had ever existed.

A Picture of the Safari Scutosaurus

Picture Credit: Everything Dinosaur

This fearsome looking beast, with its huge, squat body, powerful legs, yet stumpy comical tail that was too short to reach the ground, is proving a big hit with wargamers.  These clever resourceful people are always on the look out for good quality models to add to their wargaming collection and Scutosaurus certainly looks the part.

To view a model of Scutosaurus and other prehistoric animal models: Dinosaur Toys for Boys – Dinosaur Models

It is very appropriate that this giant Pareiasaur should prove popular with wargaming communities, although scientists are not sure how aggressive these animals were, they certainly looked frightening and the name Scutosaurus means “shield lizard”.  It is a great addition to the Wild Safari Dinos prehistoric animal model range.

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